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SPORTS
January 23, 1986 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
The guys at the top of the junior middleweight division have been avoiding Buster Drayton for so long, he has developed almost as much patience as punch. Patience was his greatest virtue last night, as he waited for the effects of his solid body attack to take a toll on Bruce Jackson. It took just five rounds worth of body bombs before Jackson's aching midriff sent the surrender message down to his legs. Jackson, a middleweight from Stillwater, Okla., absorbed a pounding left hook to the body and crumpled to the canvas at the 2:07 mark of the fifth round in the scheduled 10-rounder at Harrah's Marina Casino Hotel.
SPORTS
January 11, 1998 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new show opened with a lot of punch last night at the Tropicana Casino-Hotel. It was called Ladies Night Out, and it was the first all-women's boxing card on the East Coast. While it wasn't exactly Evander Holyfield in skirts, it kept a crowd of about 850 hooting and hollering in delight through most of the eight bouts. World champions in five weight divisions were crowned for the International Women's Boxing Federation, one of several organizations now sanctioning the popular, rapidly growing sport.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | Associated Press
DETROIT - Emanuel Steward proved rough and tough wasn't the only way to win in boxing. With a twinkle in his eyes, a smile on his face, and a soothing voice, Mr. Steward developed unique bonds in and out of the ring with a long line of champions, including Thomas Hearns, Lennox Lewis, Oscar De La Hoya, and Wladimir Klitschko. Mr. Steward, 68, owner of the Kronk Gym in Detroit, an an International Boxing Hall of Fame trainer, and an HBO boxing commentator, died Thursday at a Chicago hospital.
SPORTS
January 16, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Before Emanuel Steward made his reputation molding world champions, he made his mark as a friend and confidant to the very young. Thomas Hearns was just a skinny grade-school kid when he showed up at the Kronk Gym in Detroit and asked Steward to teach him how to box. The story was more or less the same with the McCrory brothers, Milton and Steve, and Duane Thomas. The little boys grew up, grew into top-shelf professional fighters, and from their successes was born the legend of the Kronk Gym and its tough, knowledgeable boxing director.
SPORTS
July 17, 1987 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
If the people who chart Donald Curry's course sought the most perilous path to the title, they could not have mapped a more dangerous route than the one that takes their boxer through Mike McCallum's turf tomorrow night. It is an uphill route over the rockiest road in the junior welterweight division. There are no rest stops, no shortcuts, and danger lurks at every turn. The way is littered with the sun-bleached bones of some of the division's most experienced travelers. They were all headed to some important destination when Mike McCallum stepped into their paths.
SPORTS
October 20, 1993 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the greatest fighters of his era, Thomas Hearns thinks his era is still here. Yes, the "Hit Man" is ready to give - and take - some more hits. Hearns, who has not fought since losing his World Boxing Association light- heavyweight title to Iran Barkley on March 20, 1992, will face Andrew Maynard on Nov. 6 in Las Vegas. "It killed me not to fight," said Hearns, who turned 35 Monday. "I am an entertainer. I believe in going out there and entertaining my fans and making them feel good, and when I can't do that, it bugs me. It's as if a little voice is telling me, 'Get off of your butt.
SPORTS
October 5, 1988 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was one of the wildest fights of the year - and, no, it did not take place in Seoul, South Korea. When John Wesley Meekins and Mohammed Kawoya met on Aug. 5 in Atlantic City, both men ended up getting knocked out - one officially, one unofficially, both painfully. Meekins got the victory, but just as referee Paul Venti was about to signal an end to the fight in the third round, Kawoya unleashed a wild, booming right that caught the eventual winner on the jaw, sending him to the canvas for several seconds.
SPORTS
July 18, 1987 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
Milton McCrory still looks down at his shoes and lets his arms dangle loosely at his sides when he speaks. You are always half-expecting him to grin and say, "Aw, shucks. " Winning a world title and banking hundreds of thousands of dollars have done little to relieve the shyness and the natural deference he seems to feel when a guy old enough to be his father asks his opinion about something. He is not the kind of man who would pass himself off as an expert on anything. But when McCrory speaks about tomorrow night's World Boxing Association junior middleweight fight between Mike McCallum and Donald Curry, people listen.
SPORTS
May 8, 1993 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Emanuel Steward says Gerald McClellan is the "best all-around fighter I've ever had. " What? Better than Thomas Hearns? Better than Michael Moorer? "Well, maybe he's not there yet, but he could be," said Steward, manager- trainer of numerous world champions who rose through the ranks of his fabled Kronk Gym in Detroit. "He has the skills to be the best. "In the last year, he became my major project. That's one of the reasons Moorer left me. He thought I was devoting too much of my time to Gerald.
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NEWS
October 27, 2012 | Associated Press
DETROIT - Emanuel Steward proved rough and tough wasn't the only way to win in boxing. With a twinkle in his eyes, a smile on his face, and a soothing voice, Mr. Steward developed unique bonds in and out of the ring with a long line of champions, including Thomas Hearns, Lennox Lewis, Oscar De La Hoya, and Wladimir Klitschko. Mr. Steward, 68, owner of the Kronk Gym in Detroit, an an International Boxing Hall of Fame trainer, and an HBO boxing commentator, died Thursday at a Chicago hospital.
SPORTS
January 11, 1998 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new show opened with a lot of punch last night at the Tropicana Casino-Hotel. It was called Ladies Night Out, and it was the first all-women's boxing card on the East Coast. While it wasn't exactly Evander Holyfield in skirts, it kept a crowd of about 850 hooting and hollering in delight through most of the eight bouts. World champions in five weight divisions were crowned for the International Women's Boxing Federation, one of several organizations now sanctioning the popular, rapidly growing sport.
SPORTS
January 16, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Before Emanuel Steward made his reputation molding world champions, he made his mark as a friend and confidant to the very young. Thomas Hearns was just a skinny grade-school kid when he showed up at the Kronk Gym in Detroit and asked Steward to teach him how to box. The story was more or less the same with the McCrory brothers, Milton and Steve, and Duane Thomas. The little boys grew up, grew into top-shelf professional fighters, and from their successes was born the legend of the Kronk Gym and its tough, knowledgeable boxing director.
SPORTS
October 20, 1993 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the greatest fighters of his era, Thomas Hearns thinks his era is still here. Yes, the "Hit Man" is ready to give - and take - some more hits. Hearns, who has not fought since losing his World Boxing Association light- heavyweight title to Iran Barkley on March 20, 1992, will face Andrew Maynard on Nov. 6 in Las Vegas. "It killed me not to fight," said Hearns, who turned 35 Monday. "I am an entertainer. I believe in going out there and entertaining my fans and making them feel good, and when I can't do that, it bugs me. It's as if a little voice is telling me, 'Get off of your butt.
SPORTS
May 8, 1993 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Emanuel Steward says Gerald McClellan is the "best all-around fighter I've ever had. " What? Better than Thomas Hearns? Better than Michael Moorer? "Well, maybe he's not there yet, but he could be," said Steward, manager- trainer of numerous world champions who rose through the ranks of his fabled Kronk Gym in Detroit. "He has the skills to be the best. "In the last year, he became my major project. That's one of the reasons Moorer left me. He thought I was devoting too much of my time to Gerald.
SPORTS
June 8, 1989 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Memories? Emanuel Steward has a thousand of them, culled from his two- decade association with Thomas Hearns. "The first time I saw Thomas fight, he was only 10 years old," said Steward, who was then - and still is - the director of the boxing program at the Kronk Gym in Detroit. "He was a real puny, little thing, but I couldn't help but be impressed by his determination. He just kept throwing punches and punches. "He wasn't what you'd call a great prospect the first few years.
SPORTS
October 5, 1988 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was one of the wildest fights of the year - and, no, it did not take place in Seoul, South Korea. When John Wesley Meekins and Mohammed Kawoya met on Aug. 5 in Atlantic City, both men ended up getting knocked out - one officially, one unofficially, both painfully. Meekins got the victory, but just as referee Paul Venti was about to signal an end to the fight in the third round, Kawoya unleashed a wild, booming right that caught the eventual winner on the jaw, sending him to the canvas for several seconds.
SPORTS
July 20, 1987 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
Donald Curry's name didn't even come up Saturday night when conversation turned to the future of the middleweight division. Curry, whose name always used to be mentioned in those conversations, got knocked out of the immediate future by a Mike McCallum left hook that left him dazed on the canvas of the Caesars Palace Sports Pavilion. He was pulling back from an exchange when McCallum's textbook hook slammed into his chin and sent him crashing to the canvas. Referee Richard Steele's 10 count was a mere formality; Curry didn't stir until he jerked his torso forward seemingly in response to Steele's eight count.
SPORTS
July 18, 1987 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
Milton McCrory still looks down at his shoes and lets his arms dangle loosely at his sides when he speaks. You are always half-expecting him to grin and say, "Aw, shucks. " Winning a world title and banking hundreds of thousands of dollars have done little to relieve the shyness and the natural deference he seems to feel when a guy old enough to be his father asks his opinion about something. He is not the kind of man who would pass himself off as an expert on anything. But when McCrory speaks about tomorrow night's World Boxing Association junior middleweight fight between Mike McCallum and Donald Curry, people listen.
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