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Kulpsville

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NEWS
April 23, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: This house, in Kulpsville, is a meticulously restored example of an early colonial German log house, with 90 percent of its original design retained. It is on the National Register of Historic Places. Special features: The house has its original center-hall fireplace and pegged roof trusses, as well as bead-board partitions, doors and floors that date to its 1695 construction. A pent roof, a kind of overhang, was re-created on three sides of the house where the first floor meets the second.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
You could say this is a town that wants to end its identity crisis. It's just off the Pennsylvania Turnpike, but the exit is labeled "Lansdale. " Towamencin's town center, Kulpsville, has gotten all the traffic - 18,000 cars daily on Sumneytown Pike - but little of the recognition. Now, because the Blue Route is open and the state is planning a major expansion of its toll lanes at the Lansdale interchange, township officials have decided to control progress before it controls the township.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Loretta Durborow has learned to put up with the view of the all-night convenience store across the street, and the traffic jams that sometimes prevent her from leaving her driveway on Forty Foot Road. Now, she is facing what she considers an even bigger problem: a development plan that she fears will put Kulpsville on the map - and her on the street. The town center plan, now before the Towamencin Board of Supervisors, would renovate and rezone the 280-acre Kulpsville area around Forty Foot Road and Sumneytown Pike.
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Some call it "onerous" central planning, but local officials say their proposal to shape growth in a busy corner of the township is a visionary project that will replace macadam and concrete with trails and parks. After 3 1/2 years of planning and 92 public meetings, township officials concluded public hearings Wednesday night and are ready to approve a new zoning plan that would coordinate development in Kulpsville, a regional gateway to the North Penn area that includes an interchange of the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Allen and Garnetta Pfister remember Kulpsville from when they bought their home 50 years ago. They can point out the location of the old hardware store and where two farmers lived across the street. Fox, pheasant and deer frequented the backyard. Thursday, the couple, now in their 70s, looked out at Forty Foot Road in front of their home and shook their heads as trucks and cars passed in a constant stream. Along the road are rows of homes and condominiums. "We used to have a nice little town here," Allen Pfister said.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | For The Inquirer / DAN OLESKI
At a workshop on colonial beer brewing, Nancy Reynolds pours hops into a kettle aided by Amelia Garrett, 6, of Lansdale. The event was held Saturday at the Morgan Log House in Kulpsville.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
In dogged pursuit of excellence, Michelle Konik of Long Island combed her bichon frise, Phantom, Friday at the Perkiomen Valley Kennel Club's 47th annual dog obedience show at Fischer's Park, Kulpsville.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore D. Keyser, 90, one of the nation's first Chevrolet dealers, died yesterday at North Penn Hospital in Lansdale. He lived in Lansdale. Known to all as T.D., he was a pioneer in the business. Active in the industry for 62 years before he retired in 1980, he knew both the business and his customers the way he knew the backroads of Montgomery County. Born in Hatfield Township, he spent his early years in Kulpsville and moved to Lansdale in 1928, a time when he was building his business there.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gustavo M. "Gus" Perea, 75, of Doylestown Borough, Bucks County, a retired construction company executive, died Friday at Doylestown Hospital after suffering a heart attack. He was a construction engineer and had been a vice president for George K. Heebner Inc. of Philadelphia for 15 years "from the day he arrived in this country in 1961," said his wife of 50 years, Florinda Lamadrid Perea. During his career, he also was employed by Barness Organization in Warrington, Schnabel Association of Kulpsville, and Lott Construction in Kulpsville.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Where the Blue Route goes, a development boom will surely follow. Plymouth Township knows this. So does Conshohocken. And Marple. But does Franconia Township? Ever since construction began on the 21.5-mile highway, which will connect Interstate 95 near Chester with the Pennsylvania Turnpike and Northeast Extension in Plymouth, communities along or near its path have been bracing while developers have been sizing up available land. Development analysts and transportation experts, however, are looking beyond just those communities next to the Blue Route.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For a convenience-store chain that takes the postal-carrier mantra to the retailing extreme - on the job in any weather, plus holidays - what happened to Wawa in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy can be called a crisis of unprecedented scope. Nearly a third of Wawa's 601 stores - 194 in all - were without power during the day Tuesday, most of them closed and in areas most affected by hobbled utility systems in New Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware. While Wawa was not alone in its struggle - Giant Food Stores said 33 of its supermarkets in the Philadelphia suburbs and as far west as Reading were open but subsisting on generators and ice-packed trucks in parking lots - Wawa's troubles were acutely startling.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: This house, in Kulpsville, is a meticulously restored example of an early colonial German log house, with 90 percent of its original design retained. It is on the National Register of Historic Places. Special features: The house has its original center-hall fireplace and pegged roof trusses, as well as bead-board partitions, doors and floors that date to its 1695 construction. A pent roof, a kind of overhang, was re-created on three sides of the house where the first floor meets the second.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN WRITER
Concerns about traffic and its impact on this township helped Infrastructure Authority members decide on a plan that will widen a heavily traveled road and add a footbridge - and may eventually force some residents from their homes. The authority last night unanimously approved widening a one-mile portion of Forty Foot Road in Kulpsville from two lanes to five, including a center turn lane. Board members also approved adding a pedestrian bridge across the road but asked township engineers to look at alternatives to its estimated 40-foot width.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gustavo M. "Gus" Perea, 75, of Doylestown Borough, Bucks County, a retired construction company executive, died Friday at Doylestown Hospital after suffering a heart attack. He was a construction engineer and had been a vice president for George K. Heebner Inc. of Philadelphia for 15 years "from the day he arrived in this country in 1961," said his wife of 50 years, Florinda Lamadrid Perea. During his career, he also was employed by Barness Organization in Warrington, Schnabel Association of Kulpsville, and Lott Construction in Kulpsville.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Allen and Garnetta Pfister remember Kulpsville from when they bought their home 50 years ago. They can point out the location of the old hardware store and where two farmers lived across the street. Fox, pheasant and deer frequented the backyard. Thursday, the couple, now in their 70s, looked out at Forty Foot Road in front of their home and shook their heads as trucks and cars passed in a constant stream. Along the road are rows of homes and condominiums. "We used to have a nice little town here," Allen Pfister said.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For centuries, Welsh villagers observed midsummer by casting spells, conjuring spirits and reveling in the mystifying charms of love. These rituals, which began as a celebration of the summer solstice, were both grave and giddy, attempting a glimpse into the next world while indulging in the earthly delights of this one. "It was a time of paradox and mystery," said Joan Hauger, director of the Morgan Log House, where a Midsummer's Colonial Fair...
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A crumbling, 150-year-old architectural anomaly of keen interest to local historians, officials and residents alike will get new life as the focal point of a Towamencin Township park. But first, the building will be carefully dismantled and put into storage for a while. The Board of Supervisors' decision to buy the John C. Boorse hexagonal house on Sumneytown Pike and rebuild it, using as many of the original bricks, windowpanes and slate tiles as possible, caps nearly a decade of wrangling over the structure's fate.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In two decades, Township Manager John Granger hopes, when the word Towamencin is spoken, people will think of a safe, family-oriented town with beautiful parks and trails in central Montgomery County. But he's afraid that right now, the reaction is more likely to be: "Huh?" The name is not on most maps, schools or signs. Mail to residents of this 10-square-mile township is addressed to any one of seven zip codes - none of which corresponds to Towamencin. Children attend North Penn schools, and although the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike stops practically in downtown Towamencin, the ramp is called the Lansdale exit.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Supervisors Wednesday evening took a step to distance itself from managing township properties in the Kulpsville redevelopment area. The board authorized the creation of a new agency, the Towamencin Village Authority, to oversee all business decisions regarding township properties in the district. Five seats in the authority, which likely will be created in October, will be filled this fall. But because the boundaries of the new authority's power are not clearly defined, some critics of the board are questioning the need for its creation.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | For The Inquirer / DAN OLESKI
At a workshop on colonial beer brewing, Nancy Reynolds pours hops into a kettle aided by Amelia Garrett, 6, of Lansdale. The event was held Saturday at the Morgan Log House in Kulpsville.
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