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Kung Fu

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Whoa Nelly! A widescreen extravaganza of balletic action, wild kung fu fights and intoxicating special effects, The New Legend of Shaolin is a whirlwind of martial-arts movie magic. The great Jet Li stars as a Ching Dynasty warrior who, with his 8-year-old son (the fierce-faced Tse Miu), battles endless onslaughts of evil Manchus. Father and son meet up with a mother-daughter con-artist team, and the four of them band together with five pint-sized kung fu masters. These kick-boxing kids are tattooed with portions of a map that, when assembled, reveals a hidden trove of treasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
Food: Vegan Vietnamese, starring banh mi hoagies ($4-$5) and rice noodles ($5), both starring deliciously fake (soy protein) chicken, ham and beef, dressed in cilantro, homemade pickles, coconut and/or jalapeños. Find it: For now, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 33rd and Chestnut; Saturday-Sunday at Clark Park, 43rd and Baltimore. Look for: A hand-painted hotdog cart with a red umbrella and kung fu trimmings. Eat on: The grass, or standing by a tall table balanced on milk crates.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
'The seeds of our destiny are nurtured by the roots of our past," the blind Master Po advised the earnest Grasshopper. A lot of the viewers were more concerned with getting rid of the seeds (and stems) as they watched Kung Fu, a trailblazing series that debuted in 1972. A western with a hero who had no gun and no horse, and carried his boots slung over his shoulder, Kung Fu told the story of Caine, a Shaolin priest who journeyed barefoot between adventures, spouting aphorisms such as "To go anywhere, begin by taking the first step.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The Philadelphia International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival gets an action infusion today with "The East Is Red," a thoroughly wacky kung fu epic in the tradition of the commercial, crowd-pleasing, Hong Kong school. Which is to say that it's often incomprehensible. The helpful synopsis tells us that "The East is Red" is part three of a trilogy about a creature known as Asia the Invincible, a demon warrior who castrated himself in order to obtain super powers - including the ability to kill people with needlepoint accessories.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By CARY DARLING, Fort Worth Star-Telegram
THE FIRST clue that Stephen Fung's "Tai Chi Zero" is not your usual kung-fu kickfest is when our hero - Yang Lu Chan (Yuan Xiaochao) - is introduced on a 19th century Chinese battlefield to the strains of heavy metal. And then, for several minutes that follow, it becomes a silent film complete with title cards. This is just a taste of the cross-cultural steampunk/ martial arts/ comic-book Sino-Anglo mash-up that makes "Tai Chi Zero" so visually entertaining. But, unless you're a die-hard fan of Chinese action films, its considerable charms - "Tai Chi Zero" is littered with in-jokes and references to other movies - may prove exhausting before its relatively brief 95-minute run time is over.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By DAVID FRIEDMAN, Daily News TV Critic
Despite all those Bruce Lee (or is it Bruce Li?) movies popping up like weeds on the UHF stations in town nowadays, there are many who insist that the true Golden Age of martial arts on TV ended 10 1/2 years ago. The apocalypse responsible for such cynicism was the cancellation of "Kung Fu" - the TV series in which the Old East met the Old West in the form of Kwai Chang Caine (played by David Carradine), a half-Asian, half-American vagrant who wandered through the lawless American frontier mumbling platitudes about non- violence and air-mailing foot sandwiches to anyone who disagreed with him. Well, weep no more, fellow pilgrims.
SPORTS
April 23, 2001 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Steve Schiavo wore a visor, sneakers and a T-shirt Saturday at the Central Bucks West Relays. Not the typical attire for the Pennsbury pole vaulter. Schiavo, a senior, was there to support his team and work on his tan on the sunny afternoon. He has emerged as one of the Falcons' top pole vaulters, but had to sit out because of a groin injury. He did not pull a muscle at track practice, though. The injury occurred while he was practicing kicks during kung fu, a class he has taken for 11 years.
NEWS
March 31, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Matrix" is about a war between oppressed humans and a hidden enemy fought with perception-altering software on a battleground of psychic projections. Yet despite the availability of such astonishing technology, both sides agree: We'll settle this with kung fu and guns. It's an attitude that suits "The Matrix," a loud, expensive-looking movie with the mind of a ambitious sci-fi epic and the soul of a Hong Kong action flick. It almost could have been made by two people.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1993 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
OK, martial-arts experts: Which pithy, yet fundamentally revealing, homily is not uttered by the inscrutable Kwai Chang Caine in the first 10 minutes of Kung Fu: The Legend Continues? (1) To achieve victory, one must get inside the skin of his opponent. (2) When your enemy is weak, you must make him strong. (3) Never squash a grasshopper. It could be your grandfather. The answer, of course, is No. 3 - a concept so universally known and understandable to fans of the old Kung Fu that it goes without saying, even among the most deliciously obvious claptrap of this campy revival of a camp TV classic (8 tonight on Channel 17)
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why am I so excited by Into the Badlands ? AMC's six-part mini-series, starring kung-fu adept Daniel Wu as an assassin, marks the first time in eons that a TV show has been dedicated to martial arts. It'll be shown in six weekly episodes beginning at 10 p.m. Sunday. Yes, it's riddled with comic-book clichés. True, the dialogue is out of a Cracker Jack box, and most of its characters have less dimension than cardboard cutouts. But I'm a sucker for well-choreographed kung fu films.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
"KUNG FU PANDA 3" chopped all competitors down to size this past weekend, dominating the North American box office with a respectable $41 million, according to Rentrak estimates. The animated sequel fared much better than the weekend's other new openers: "The Finest Hours" debuted in fourth place with $10.3 million, "Fifty Shades of Black" earned a modest $6.2 million, "Jane Got a Gun" brought in only $803,000. Someone's getting a write-off. "The Revenant" and "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" took second and third place with $12.4 million and $10.8 million, respectively.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Fifty Shades of Black Marlon Wayans stars as Christian Black, a wealthy businessman who teaches Kali Hawk's inexperienced college newspaper reporter a thing or two in this 50 Shades of Grey parody. R The Finest Hours A daring nautical rescue in the stormy seas off New England. Chris Pine, Casey Affleck, and Eric Bana star in the based-on-real-events Coast Guard saga. PG-13 Kung Fu Panda 3 The second sequel in the hit computer-animated franchise, with Po (the voice of Jack Black)
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why am I so excited by Into the Badlands ? AMC's six-part mini-series, starring kung-fu adept Daniel Wu as an assassin, marks the first time in eons that a TV show has been dedicated to martial arts. It'll be shown in six weekly episodes beginning at 10 p.m. Sunday. Yes, it's riddled with comic-book clichés. True, the dialogue is out of a Cracker Jack box, and most of its characters have less dimension than cardboard cutouts. But I'm a sucker for well-choreographed kung fu films.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
BLACK HISTORY MONTH Unsung heroine Moonstone Art Center wraps up its commemoration of the life and accomplishments of antilynching crusader, suffragist, journalist and speaker Ida B. Wells with a discussion of the relationship between 19th-century lynching and modern-day capital punishment. Criminal defense attorney Michael Coard, Witness to Innocence activist Shujaa Graham and others to speak. Ethical Humanist Society of Philadelphia, 1906 S. Rittenhouse Square, 2 p.m. Sunday, free, 215-735-3456, moonstoneartscenter.org.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By CARY DARLING, Fort Worth Star-Telegram
THE FIRST clue that Stephen Fung's "Tai Chi Zero" is not your usual kung-fu kickfest is when our hero - Yang Lu Chan (Yuan Xiaochao) - is introduced on a 19th century Chinese battlefield to the strains of heavy metal. And then, for several minutes that follow, it becomes a silent film complete with title cards. This is just a taste of the cross-cultural steampunk/ martial arts/ comic-book Sino-Anglo mash-up that makes "Tai Chi Zero" so visually entertaining. But, unless you're a die-hard fan of Chinese action films, its considerable charms - "Tai Chi Zero" is littered with in-jokes and references to other movies - may prove exhausting before its relatively brief 95-minute run time is over.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
In an era of fashionista rappers with gangsta attitude, such as Nicki Minaj and Azealia Banks, it's awesome — even necessary — that Eve make her return. At 33, Philly's self-proclaimed "pit bull in a skirt" can show up any of her imitators. She proved as much during an intimate (200 people) gig Wednesday at Fishtown's funky Kung Fu Necktie. From her earliest days as one of the Ruff Ryders to her own pop-hop hits ("Who's That Girl?") and a klatch of smash collaborations with Gwen Stefani, Eve was always the queen of swagger.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
'W e're at an administrative disadvantage but also a creative advantage," says the Spinto Band's Nick Krill. Krill and Thomas Hughes, the Delaware sextet's two principal songwriters and vocalists, are in a Wilmington coffee shop talking about the launch of their new label, Spintonic Recordings, and self-releasing and self-producing Shy Pursuit, their third official album. History is complicated for the Spinto Band. Their first album was really their seventh or eighth, and their new album is actually more than a year old. By the time they put out Nice and Nicely Done in 2006, they had been making records in their basement for years, although few were formally released.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
Food: Vegan Vietnamese, starring banh mi hoagies ($4-$5) and rice noodles ($5), both starring deliciously fake (soy protein) chicken, ham and beef, dressed in cilantro, homemade pickles, coconut and/or jalapeños. Find it: For now, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 33rd and Chestnut; Saturday-Sunday at Clark Park, 43rd and Baltimore. Look for: A hand-painted hotdog cart with a red umbrella and kung fu trimmings. Eat on: The grass, or standing by a tall table balanced on milk crates.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Your TV hates you. How do I know? It's never there when you need it. Seriously, wouldn't you like some entertainment on a Saturday night? Ha! Let's take a gander at what the networks are offering this week, shall we? ABC starts off with Wipeout , its painful pratfall game show. Literally adding insult to injury, it's a repeat. In fact, the night has become such a den of reruns, it'll save us time just to list the original programming. To wit: back-to-back Cops on Fox, 48 Hours Mystery on CBS, and The Firm on NBC. In other words, two series that always seem like repeats anyway and a third - The Firm - that NBC has given up on and is merely burning off the episodes already paid for. I know, I know, there are a thousand other options out there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Baltimore-based singer/songwriter Cass McCombs is renowned for his bleak, urbane lyrics and melancholy musicality. There's a cool sense of distance to some of his saddest, smartest songs. There's ambition beneath the laconic surface, though. McCombs is driven enough to have released two albums in 2011, Humor Risk and Wit's End ; energetic enough to write complicated, cosmopolitan, humorous songs that plumb valuable emotional depths; and calculating enough to plan a wildly entertaining tour with one-man-jug-band opening act Frank Fairfield.
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