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Kung Fu

NEWS
September 28, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Bob Karmel has a black belt in karate. He also has a black belt in kung fu and another black belt in jujitsu. Yet all this chopping, screaming and kicking didn't seem real enough to Karmel - too much philosophy, too many belts, not enough real combat. And then Karmel - who gives every appearance of being a peaceful, non- homicidal fellow - discovered the bloody reality of Thai boxing. For about seven years the 36-year-old Karmel has studied, practiced, and now teaches this most violent form of the martial arts.
NEWS
June 5, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ashton Kutcher is way buff. Katherine Heigl is beautiful, busty, and slim. And the south of France, where their new flick, the eminently missable Killers , is set, is gorgeous. Hmm - so what else is there to say about this most mismatched pair's ill-conceived, boring, cliche-driven, humor-challenged romantic action comedy? Did we say the scenery is nice? Directed by Robert Luketic, the genius who gave us the insipid Heigl romance The Ugly Truth (2009), Killers is about a (really, really buff)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A businessman and his secretary, both married to different people, kiss in the office. Scandal! Scandal indeed - if you're talking about small-town America in the mid-1960s. Especially if that town is Peyton Place. That scene, and others like it, shocked many a citizen in 1964 when a TV version of Lana Turner's 1957 Oscar-nominated film - and Grace Metalious' controversial book - debuted on ABC. Peyton Place: Part One from Shout! Factory (www.shoutfactorystore.
SPORTS
January 25, 2001 | By Jerry Brewer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Enough, he told himself. You are better than this, he told himself. Shut up and do something about it, he told himself. Take kung fu and get better, he told himself. Show them your worth, instead of telling it, he told himself. Then the voice inside Amani Toomer's head was evicted. Serenity became the new tenant. "I just stopped worrying about being the guy on the sideline, moping and complaining," the New York Giants' wide receiver said. "I stopped worrying about the things I had no control over.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hot, humid and cramped Carusi Junior High School cafeteria was the last place 6 1/2-year-old Alex Chan wanted to be on a sunny Sunday summer afternoon. But there he was, with about 340 other Chinese American children from all over South Jersey and the Philadelphia area. The occasion was the graduation and awards ceremony for the Chinese School of South Jersey, founded 26 years ago to foster knowledge and understanding of Chinese language and culture. Alex seemed to see it as sort of a drag.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Fighting Dragons compete, opponents sometimes suggest that the young martial artists not mention they're from North Philadelphia. It would hurt their chances of ranking in tournaments, they say. People might perceive them as bad kids. Preston Collins Jr., the team's instructor, understands, but dismisses the thought. He wants kids at Simon Gratz High to feel proud of who they are and where they're from. Some of them were dealing dope, robbing people and skipping school.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Paramount's TV division has been getting its lumps lately. Its much-touted magazine show America has just been canceled, and now comes word that Entertainment Tonight has gotten a couple of hard knocks in two key markets - New York and Chicago. WABC-TV of New York, ABC's flagship in the East, is dropping E.T. from its 7:30 p.m. time slot in favor of an updated Hollywood Squares. In the Windy City, WMAQ-TV, an NBC-owned station, is waving bye-bye to E.T. for The New Newlywed Game at 6:30 p.m. The changes will occur this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Though their work mainly suggests otherwise, Guariglia and Chen do not come through the fine-art channels. Not so long ago, Justin Guariglia was a documentary photographer; Zoe Chen is a fashion designer who has worked for Issey Miyake. Together, the two have created a seamless, quasi-conceptual collaborative art that borrows its look from the worlds of fine art, advertising, commercial photography and Buddhism (that their work was recently selected for a two-year Nokia print and TV ad campaign and will also be the subject of a book published by the Aperture Foundation tells you something about its broad appeal)
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | By Angela Valdez INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marian Reich lifted a slender leg into the air above her waist and gently lowered it back to the floor. Two onlookers oohed in admiration, but Reich brushed aside any compliments. "It's no big deal," she said. Actually, it is. After years of swimming laps, Reich, 72, of Cherry Hill, is in good shape, but when an inner-ear infection sent her sense of balance into flux last year, her ear-nose-and-throat specialist didn't just give her a prescription. He sent her to tai chi. Now, Reich has been enrolled at the Barry Brown Health Education Center at Virtua West Jersey Hospital Voorhees for several months, and the tai chi classes, she says, have not only improved her balance but have also made her stronger and more flexible.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2007 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
A team book starring Misty Knight; Colleen Wing; Black Cat; Shang-Chi, the Master of Kung Fu; Tarantula; and Orka, the Killer Whale would usually have trouble making it past the pitch stage. After all, Shang-Chi is the only one who has been able to sustain his own series. So the odds were against "Heroes for Hire" being a sales success. It has been surprise hit, however, for several reasons. First, writers Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray are telling, fun, fast-paced stories.
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