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Kung Fu

NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
There are different ways to make it as a child actor, but none, apparently, as effective as having Will Smith as your dad. His adorable son Jaden headlines the remake of "Karate Kid," the '80s B-movie classic that's been given an eye-popping upgrade on its way to serving as a star vehicle for little Jaden, who had three months of training from kung-fu master Wu Gang in advance of the epic four-month shoot. In place of Pat Morita is Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan, and in place of forgettable SoCal locations isĀ .
NEWS
June 5, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ashton Kutcher is way buff. Katherine Heigl is beautiful, busty, and slim. And the south of France, where their new flick, the eminently missable Killers , is set, is gorgeous. Hmm - so what else is there to say about this most mismatched pair's ill-conceived, boring, cliche-driven, humor-challenged romantic action comedy? Did we say the scenery is nice? Directed by Robert Luketic, the genius who gave us the insipid Heigl romance The Ugly Truth (2009), Killers is about a (really, really buff)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A businessman and his secretary, both married to different people, kiss in the office. Scandal! Scandal indeed - if you're talking about small-town America in the mid-1960s. Especially if that town is Peyton Place. That scene, and others like it, shocked many a citizen in 1964 when a TV version of Lana Turner's 1957 Oscar-nominated film - and Grace Metalious' controversial book - debuted on ABC. Peyton Place: Part One from Shout! Factory (www.shoutfactorystore.
NEWS
March 12, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The funniest thing about Marnie Stern isn't how she attacks the fret board with the nimbleness of Eddie Van Halen, the complexity of a Frank Zappa, or the shredding capability of Slayer's Kerry King. It's not that the Upper East Side-raised guitar goddess started her recording career in alt-punk metal after age 30, when she released In Advance of the Broken Arm in 2007. It's not even that the blond, tanned Stern carries her small pooch, a Morkie named Fig, with her while on tour.
SPORTS
September 7, 2008 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
There's a hilarious scene in Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy where the members of various news stations around town gather to fight gangland style. Too many outlets in San Diego, they mutually decide, so they grab tire irons and chains and do battle. Philly needs to thin the field, too. The market is saturated with Eagles entertainment in the hours before game time. Between Comcast SportsNet's new Pre-Game Live , and the offerings on WYSP-FM and WIP-AM, there are far too many suitors for your attention leading up to kickoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the J-Horror fad may have come and gone (well, most of these films have gone to remake-land in Hollywood), things have never been better for that old mainstay of Asian cinema - the martial-arts movie. Genius Products (a division of the Weinstein Brothers) has practically cornered the market on the best of Hong Kong martial-arts cinema with its "Dragon Dynasty" DVD collection. The remarkable series, launched just two years ago, already boasts 29 titles, each featuring a wealth of extras, including at least one commentary track, making-of featurettes, and cast and crew interviews - not to mention surveys of martial-arts weapons and techniques.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
As one of the four or five people in the world who thought "Bulletproof Monk" was a good movie, I guess I'm the target audience for "Forbidden Kingdom. " The setup is eerily similar - an American kid (Michael Angarano), obsessed with kung fu movies, gets drawn into a centuries-old battle among supernatural Chinese factions, centered around some magical relic. In this case, it's a fighting staff belonging to a good but mischievous king (Jet Li), who sends the relic into the future so it will not fall into the hands of an evil emperor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By Keita S. Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mixed martial arts meets the movie box office. The introduction to one of America's fastest-growing sports comes today by way of Never Back Down, the big-budget film starring Djimon Hounsou. Kung-fu arts and ninjitsu were the traditional way that movies explored the martial arts. The Chinese term kung fu has been defined literally as energy time. Mixed martial artists use this principle to become complete striking and submissions grappling experts. Will real MMA fighters appreciate the way their sport has been translated into cinema?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Though their work mainly suggests otherwise, Guariglia and Chen do not come through the fine-art channels. Not so long ago, Justin Guariglia was a documentary photographer; Zoe Chen is a fashion designer who has worked for Issey Miyake. Together, the two have created a seamless, quasi-conceptual collaborative art that borrows its look from the worlds of fine art, advertising, commercial photography and Buddhism (that their work was recently selected for a two-year Nokia print and TV ad campaign and will also be the subject of a book published by the Aperture Foundation tells you something about its broad appeal)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2007 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
A team book starring Misty Knight; Colleen Wing; Black Cat; Shang-Chi, the Master of Kung Fu; Tarantula; and Orka, the Killer Whale would usually have trouble making it past the pitch stage. After all, Shang-Chi is the only one who has been able to sustain his own series. So the odds were against "Heroes for Hire" being a sales success. It has been surprise hit, however, for several reasons. First, writers Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray are telling, fun, fast-paced stories.
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