CollectionsKwanzaa
IN THE NEWS

Kwanzaa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he placed a kinara on display at the African American Museum in Philadelphia Saturday, Mlanjeni Nduma paused to correct a child confused by the wooden candleholder's resemblance to a menorah. "No, it's not Hanukkah. It's Kwanzaa," Nduma, who was leading a Kwanzaa celebration at the museum, told the boy. "People say that all the time. " Though Kwanzaa dates to the mid-1960s, the seven-day celebration of African American culture, heritage, and family born out of the black nationalist movement still is unfamiliar to many people, Nduma said.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
As more than 200 people watched, 50 dancers from the Afro-One dance company leaped and bounded across the floor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church in a dance to celebrate Kwanzaa, an Afro-American holiday. The spectators, mostly families, gathered at the Burlington City church on Dec. 29 to reflect on cooperative economics, the theme of the fourth day of the week-long celebration. "Kwanzaa is a unique and distinct holiday based on the celebration of the harvest and literally means first fruits," said Patricia Reid-Bookhart, founder and director of Afro-One, a Willingboro dance company, which hosted the celebration.
NEWS
January 3, 2011
RE "Kwanzaa a nice idea, but it won't catch on": This is the most insulting and politically incorrect letter I've ever read. It appears the writer needs to take his own advice about education. His letter was inaccurate and disingenuous. The fact is that, in 1966, Dr. Maulana Karenga, a male professor of black studies at California State University in Long Beach, Calif., created a nonpolitical and nonreligious celebration of African values. Kwanzaa is more than an idea, as the writer claims it is, about values and principles such as unity, community, self-sufficiency that need to be practiced all year round.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Broad Street yesterday looked like a painter's palette. The costumes were flowing with colors: reds, yellows, purples. Wind-blown banners stretched and contracted: reds, blacks, greens. They stroked the sky: an overcast gray. Philadelphia hung heavy with winter bluster and Philadelphians rested from yuletide joy, but in this part of North Philadelphia, the celebration was just beginning. The wail of a bagpipe cut the air, riding atop the rumble of the Broad Street Subway. For the more than 100 marchers parading up Broad Street through North Philadelphia, their fourth annual parade marked the beginning of the week-long Afro-American culture festival of Kwanzaa.
FOOD
December 21, 1994 | by Barbara Ann Rosenberg, Special to the Daily News
Kwanzaa, the cultural holiday that African-Americans have celebrated since 1966, begins Dec. 26 and lasts for seven days, concluding on New Year's Day. The holiday - which has come to be observed by people of African descent in other nations as well as America - was created by Maulana (Ron) Karenga, a professor of black studies at California State University College in Long Beach. Karenga envisioned a non-religious celebration of thanksgiving and sharing in which African-Americans from all faiths could participate.
FOOD
December 20, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
This year marks the 30th anniversary of Kwanzaa, the nondenominational holiday during which many African-Americans celebrate their cultural roots. From Dec. 26 through New Year's Day, African-Americans seek to illuminate the past, present and future of a rich heritage, particularly as it applies to family and community. Kwanzaa translates from Swahili to "first fruits of the harvest. " Food plays an important role in the festival, which was created in 1966 by Maulana Karenga, chairman of black studies at California State University, Long Beach.
NEWS
December 21, 2007 | Edith Lawrence-Hilliard
Edith Lawrence-Hilliard is a community organizer and advocate in Madison, Wis. Kwanzaa is a celebration of life and a time for inclusion. The name, which comes from the Swahili word for first fruit, has come to symbolize Pan-African values of family, community and culture. Starting on Wednesday and lasting a week, Kwanzaa calls on us in the African American community to honor its seven basic principles for living: unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, economic cooperation, purpose, creativity and faith.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / MARK STEIN
Activities marking Kwanzaa, a celebration of African-American cultural heritage, are as festive as those of other holidays at this time of year. In Willingboro, they featured a presentation by Afro One - a dance, drama and musical group. The performance took place at the Willingboro VFW hall on Dec. 28, the third day of the seven-day holiday, which is patterned after a West African harvest festival.
NEWS
December 26, 2006 | By Akilah Monifa
I celebrate Kwanzaa, a holiday that honors family, community and culture. My family and I have done so for years. But five years after Sept. 11, in this climate of religious and cultural intolerance in America, I can sympathize with Muslims here who feel like outsiders. Many white Americans are suspicious and fearful of Kwanzaa. Like other holidays that are celebrated predominantly by people of color - such as Ramadan, Juneteenth, Holi, Hispanic Heritage Month - Kwanzaa ought to be an opportunity for those who are unfamiliar with it to learn more.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | Inquirer photos by Tom Gralish
It is a seven-day celebration that is only 29 years old yet steeped in ancient African tradition, a festival of kinship that is spiritual yet not religious. Kwanzaa, a uniquely African American observance that begins annually on Dec. 26, crosses class and cultural lines, all the while reaffirming its seven basic principles: unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, economic freedom, pride and purpose, creativity, and faith. Each day, one red, green or black candle is lit to reaffirm that day's principle as families exchange gifts and wish each other well in the coming year.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOUTH PHILADELPHIA Marking the African American holiday of Kwanzaa, local civic leaders will hold a citywide "Kwanzaabration" Saturday at Audenreid High School in South Philadelphia. The free indoor festival will be hosted by music impresario and developer Kenny Gamble and Bumi Fernandez, head of Odunde 365, a group dedicated to cultural enrichment in the African American community. It will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and feature activities for children and families. Kwanzaabration will include a pavilion with free health screenings, a children's pavilion with face painting, arts and crafts, and a fashion show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013
PARTY CITY sells paper party supplies for Kwanzaa. You can pick up a Kwanzaa greeting card at a Hallmark store, or a book on the subject at Walmart. And who could forget celebrity chef Sandra Dee's blunder when she made a semi-homemade monstrosity that she called a Kwanzaa cake? (See video at phillydailynews.com.) But there are still a whole lot of folks, African-Americans included, who will give you a blank stare if you ask them about Kwanzaa. Many have never embraced the holiday, worried that it's somehow anti-Christian.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he placed a kinara on display at the African American Museum in Philadelphia Saturday, Mlanjeni Nduma paused to correct a child confused by the wooden candleholder's resemblance to a menorah. "No, it's not Hanukkah. It's Kwanzaa," Nduma, who was leading a Kwanzaa celebration at the museum, told the boy. "People say that all the time. " Though Kwanzaa dates to the mid-1960s, the seven-day celebration of African American culture, heritage, and family born out of the black nationalist movement still is unfamiliar to many people, Nduma said.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
KWANZAA IS A time for unity, when communities come together and reflect on their common heritage. This weekend, the African American Museum in Philadelphia will do just that with a full schedule of Kwanzaa-related events. The holiday is usually celebrated over a week - Wednesday through Jan. 1 this year - with each day representing one of the seven principles of African heritage. Saturday is Ujamaa, the day of cooperative economics, and Sunday is Nia, the day of purpose. Among the events Saturday is a session on the African diaspora and black genealogy with the African-American Genealogy Group.
NEWS
January 7, 2011
THANK YOU, Jenice Armstrong, for your enlightening column on Kwanzaa. Contrary to the numerous misunderstandings about the holiday's significance, many families and church communities throughout our nation do observe the seven principles or "nguzo saba. " In that spirit, here is my prayer for the new year: 1. For the unity (umoja) of the human spirit that transcends race, culture, religious and political affiliations. 2. For self-determination (kujichagulia) cultivating a strong sense of individual pride and integrity.
NEWS
January 6, 2011
IREAD JENICE Armstrong's Dec. 21 column with great sadness since I've been celebrating Kwanzaa for 40 years and raised my children (27 and 39 now) with this wonderful African-American tradition that instills a value system of unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith. It's also a time when we celebrate the lives of our departed family members and historic freedom fighters. We recall the lives of Touissaint L'Overture, who led the slave rebellion in Haiti, journalist Ida B. Wells, who carried out an anti-lynching campaign in black newspapers across the country, and Fannie Lou Hamer, who led the Mississippi Freedom Party.
NEWS
January 3, 2011
RE "Kwanzaa a nice idea, but it won't catch on": This is the most insulting and politically incorrect letter I've ever read. It appears the writer needs to take his own advice about education. His letter was inaccurate and disingenuous. The fact is that, in 1966, Dr. Maulana Karenga, a male professor of black studies at California State University in Long Beach, Calif., created a nonpolitical and nonreligious celebration of African values. Kwanzaa is more than an idea, as the writer claims it is, about values and principles such as unity, community, self-sufficiency that need to be practiced all year round.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
RE JENICE Armstrong's Kwanzaa column: The piece was excellent - informative and balanced. I'm an old head who's very into our culture and wishes Kwanzaa was more accepted. I liken the situation to being adopted. We know we come from somewhere else, but we have no connection. If you found out your ancestral name was Solenke, would you change it? Would that change the relationship you have with the name Armstrong and the family you love with that name? Kwanzaa is a valiant attempt to help us Africans in the diaspora reconnect, but regrettably I have to agree with Jen's theme.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
RE JENICE Armstrong's recent column on Kwanzaa: I don't have a clue whether the number of blacks celebrating Kwanzaa is increasing or declining, since I can't polling every African-American in the nation, so I'll simply speak for me. Thirteen years ago, my family decided to make Kwanzaa a yearly tradition. And each year it gets bigger as the family grows. I have to juggle the family Kwanzaa activities with about a half-dozen invites to other Kwanzaa events. As it relates to the celebration of Christmas (the birth of the baby Jesus in a manger)
NEWS
December 27, 2010
RE JENICE ARMSTRONG'S Dec. 21 column: Jenice, Kwanzaa is not a true holiday! It was made up by a lady from California who had strong desires to have a black celebration of some kind in this country. Kwanzaa is a nice idea for those who share its creator's feelings, but it is not truly part of the black American culture. Most black people know nothing about Swahili! Even though we have those who talk about slavery and how it stripped black Americans of their roots, we should not attempt to falsify ourselves into being what we are not. We are black Americans, and we have contributed to the American culture, in spite of the negatives of racism and slavery.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|