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Kyoto Protocol

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NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Patrick J. Michaels
Kudos to President Bush, the first world leader whose administration has publicly pronounced the Kyoto Protocol stone-cold dead. It's about time, and it's about mathematics. Kyoto was probably the dumbest international instrument ever signed by an American chief executive. Strong words, but easy to back up with a little primer on climate change. If we just continue on our merry way, doing nothing and with no specific attempt to proliferate technologies that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the earth will continue to warm.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | JULI MCGREEVY
The debate over greenhouse emissions has become even hotter. By signing the Kyoto Protocol, our administration supports an environmentally ineffective and economically unfair initiative. This protocol, negotiated in 1997 in Japan, has been publicly scrutinized because of unanswered questions and economic pitfalls. Prior to the Kyoto meeting, the Senate voted 95-0 that the United States not sign any agreement imposing unequal commitments on industrialized and developing nations and resulting in serious harm to the U.S. economy.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Michelle Malkin's column (April 30) is replete with the same elitist diatribe that anyone concerned with environmental issues has come to expect from the misinformed. Is the United States, leading source of environmental pollution, too good to abide by the Kyoto protocol while other nations are willing to abide by it? Her only valid point is that underdeveloped nations are experiencing threats of diarrhea and malaria, but she fails to mention that billions of dollars and a handful of decades have been spent to combat these diseases, sadly with little to no long-term success.
NEWS
February 18, 2005 | By Iain Murray
The Kyoto Protocol on climate change, which came into force this week, represents a massive act of folly by many of the world's industrialized nations. It sets the world on a course to economic disaster while doing nothing to alleviate global warming. It is the wrong solution to the wrong problem at the wrong time. Kyoto attempts to alleviate what may be a major cause of warming - the emission of greenhouse gases - by suppressing energy use in the developed world. Yet energy use is vital to modern health and wealth.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Stephen Seplow INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 3 1/2 years since 160 nations meeting in Kyoto, Japan, set out guidelines to control global warming by cutting the amount of greenhouse gases the industrialized nations send into the atmosphere. In that time, only 37 nations have ratified the Kyoto Protocol; and only a few, such as Romania and Mexico, are close to being industrialized. Almost all the rest are small, developing countries such as Tuvalu, Micronesia, Barbados and El Salvador, which have little impact on the global environment.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | By Charles Krauthammer
Remember George, this is no time to go wobbly. " So said Margaret Thatcher to the first President Bush just days after Saddam Hussein attacked Kuwait. Bush did not go wobbly. He invaded. A decade later, the second George Bush immediately began a radical reorientation of U.S. foreign policy. Now, however, the conventional wisdom is that in the face of criticism from domestic opponents and foreign allies, Bush is backing down. Has W. gone wobbly? In his first days, he offered a new American nuclear policy that scraps the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, builds defenses against ballistic-missile attack, and unilaterally cuts U.S. offensive nuclear forces without wrangling with the Russians over arms control, the way of the past 30 years.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the global-warming debate, the United States is getting thoroughly trashed abroad. Yesterday, the venue was Cambridge University, where scientists are meeting for the 12th Global Warming International Conference, a three-day examination of the implications of climate change. As the conference got under way yesterday, Topic A for the 100 or so delegates was President Bush's announcement two weeks ago that the United States would not implement the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | Michelle Malkin
Christie Whitman has committed some of the Bush administration's biggest gaffes to date - most infamously, her ill-fated crusade to drastically reduce carbon dioxide emissions at all costs to thwart alleged global warming. Bush Republicans are right to thwack Whitman for espousing a radical agenda that defies basic principles of limited government and economic common sense. But I'm not going to join the pinata party. There is no sport in assaulting such an easy target. The liberal Republican ex-governor of New Jersey and current head of the Environmental Protection Agency has never hidden her true colors.
NEWS
December 25, 2000
MARKET, NOT GOVERNMENT, BEST FOR ENVIRONMENT I was amazed to find that you are just now realizing that industry is taking action to address the challenges of climate change ("Get real on warming," Inquirer, Dec. 11). This is old news. For years, the Global Climate Coalition has been a strong advocate for market-flexible solutions that are long-term, not temporary fixes that miss the real issues. Industries in every sector of our economy have been aggressively promoting voluntary programs, partnerships and new technologies that are reducing, avoiding or eliminating emissions through better efficiency, improved conservation and new methods.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scenario is becoming all too familiar. The nations of the world gather in an effort to find a way to soften the impacts of global climate change - and spend the time criticizing the United States. So it was this week at the Hague, Netherlands, where 180 nations are negotiating the implementation of the three-year-old Kyoto Protocol. The protocol calls for a rollback in emissions of the "greenhouses gases" that appear to be raising global temperatures and changing climate.
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NEWS
February 1, 2013
Grand engineer behind it all How sad that an article celebrating the 100th anniversary of Grand Central Station in Manhattan fails to mention the engineering genius who conceived and carried out its construction. ("Grand, indeed; A railroad station celebrates a century," Jan 27) The many innovations attributed to architect Whitney Warren, in fact, were the brainchild of Col. William J. Wilgus. Wilgus, New York Central Railroad's vice president and chief engineer, had an inspired vision of an underground electrified terminal.
NEWS
December 6, 2009 | By Ben Lieberman
A new global-warming treaty would be all economic pain and little environmental gain for America even if China and other fast-developing nations sign on. But if developing nations remain exempted, it would be all economic pain and no environmental gain. Either way, America should stay out! At the United Nations' Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen this week, proponents of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol - which expires in 2012 - will try to hash out a new agreement for lowering carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-gas emissions.
NEWS
January 22, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Climate change is by nature a global problem. So when a Pennsylvania State University graduate student presented Montgomery County officials with a 145-page report on what it could do to reduce greenhouse gases - the culprits in global warming - Commissioner Thomas Jay Ellis was skeptical. Could one county - even one with more people than some states - make a difference in such a huge problem? Ellis and his fellow commissioners decided this month that it could at least try. Montgomery County, which emits more greenhouse gases than more than half the world's nations do individually, thereby joined a burgeoning list of cities, counties and states that have stopped waiting for federal direction on global-warming remediation.
NEWS
July 9, 2005 | By William Douglas INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Leaders from the world's top eight industrial nations ended their annual summit yesterday by agreeing that humans are a major cause of global warming and pledging to work toward reducing it, but they did not commit to any specific actions or timetables. Vowing not to be sidetracked by the deadly London bombings a day earlier, the Group of Eight also pledged to double financial aid to African nations to $50 billion a year by 2010, forgive the debts of 18 of the world's poorest nations, and to provide up to $9 billion over three years to the Palestinian Authority to assist its drive to become an independent state.
NEWS
February 18, 2005 | By Iain Murray
The Kyoto Protocol on climate change, which came into force this week, represents a massive act of folly by many of the world's industrialized nations. It sets the world on a course to economic disaster while doing nothing to alleviate global warming. It is the wrong solution to the wrong problem at the wrong time. Kyoto attempts to alleviate what may be a major cause of warming - the emission of greenhouse gases - by suppressing energy use in the developed world. Yet energy use is vital to modern health and wealth.
NEWS
February 18, 2005 | By Frida Ghitis
This week brought yet another sterling occasion for America-bashers around the world to pummel the United States. When the Kyoto Protocol - now the Kyoto Treaty - at long last went into effect on Wednesday, it received little attention in this country but massive media coverage in much of the world. Kyoto, the first major international agreement to fight global warming, started as an emblem of humanity's urgent need to protect the environment. Not long after George W. Bush took office, however, Kyoto took on a new meaning: as the symbol of America the Selfish.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
In the United States, global warming is mocked in novels, movies and even on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Elsewhere, it's taken seriously, as it should be. British Prime Minister Tony Blair has made climate change a priority of his coming leadership of the Group of 8 industrial nations and the European Union. Here's what he said in September: "What is now plain is that the emission of greenhouse gases, associated with industrialization and strong economic growth from a world population that has increased sixfold in 200 years, is causing global warming at a rate that began as significant and has become alarming . . . a challenge so far-reaching in its impact and irreversible in its destructive power that it alters radically human existence.
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | By James Lindsay and Gregory Michaelidis
International treaties are out of favor with the Bush White House. Since taking office, the administration has withdrawn U.S. support for an array of agreements governing global warming, biological weapons, and creation of an international criminal court. It has also worked to water down a proposed pact limiting the sale of small-arms around the world. The administration insists it supports what these treaties seek to accomplish. It just objects to how they go about doing it. To be fair, nobody thinks the White House favors global warming or thugs toting biological weapons.
NEWS
July 25, 2001
The globe may be warming up. But the United States is out in the cold. While America stood silently by, 178 other nations achieved a compromise in Bonn, Germany, this week to revive a withering global warming action plan. If adopted internationally, it could help reduce rising heat-trapping gases, also known as greenhouse emissions, that are dangerously warming the atmosphere. Like the United States, many other nations, most notably Japan, saw problems with the plan. Unlike the United States, those countries showed wisdom in remaining part of the protocol so they could continue trying to influence its details.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Stephen Seplow INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 3 1/2 years since 160 nations meeting in Kyoto, Japan, set out guidelines to control global warming by cutting the amount of greenhouse gases the industrialized nations send into the atmosphere. In that time, only 37 nations have ratified the Kyoto Protocol; and only a few, such as Romania and Mexico, are close to being industrialized. Almost all the rest are small, developing countries such as Tuvalu, Micronesia, Barbados and El Salvador, which have little impact on the global environment.
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