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La Cosa Nostra

NEWS
September 2, 2011 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
RALPH NATALE has always been a talker. In 1994, after doing 15 years in prison on drug-dealing and arson charges, he talked himself into bed with a hot blonde half his age - his daughter's best friend - with empty promises of a better life and a yarn about his 62-year-old wife's ailing health. While he was boss of the Philadelphia mob, the FBI secretly recorded Natale talking about sketchy business deals, insubordinate underlings, a proposed Atlantic City strip club with "the finest broads" and his hatred for government informants who rat on fellow Mafia members.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has refused to issue a get-out-of-jail card for reputed mob boss Joseph "Uncle Joe" Ligambi, rejecting a defense attorney's argument that a magistrate judge had erred last month when ordering Ligambi held without bail. After an hour-long hearing Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno said he agreed with the lower court's assessment that Ligambi, 71, would be a danger to the community if released. Neither electronic monitoring nor house arrest - two restrictions suggested by defense attorney Edwin Jacobs Jr. - could ensure that Ligambi would refrain from directing and coordinating organized-crime activities, Robreno said in upholding the order of Magistrate Judge Timothy R. Rice.
NEWS
May 25, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
When Pennsylvania officials launched a state lottery in 1972, optimistic bureaucrats predicted the end of the illegal numbers racket. Five years later, the state debuted a 7 p.m. "Daily Number" game eerily similar to the tavern and barbershop action preferred by those not wishing to involve the government in their gambling. Twenty years after that, in 1997, lottery officials trumpeted an exciting new promotion: a second Daily Number drawing . . . in the afternoon. "The state was trying to compete with bookies!"
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
AS HE LEFT the U.S. Attorney's Office in 2007, renowned mob prosecutor Barry Gross spiked the football - right in the faces of all the South Philly wiseguys he'd put behind bars. "We defeated the mob," Gross proclaimed during a post-retirement interview with the Daily News . Yesterday's sweeping indictment against reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joseph "Uncle Joe" Ligambi and 12 alleged associates is clear proof that Gross was wrong. Or was he? The Philadelphia faction of La Cosa Nostra is a shadow of its former self, eclipsed by the more sophisticated and creative Russian mafia and other underworld groups that profit from vice and scams.
NEWS
April 10, 2011 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're calling it Mob Wives , although Mob Women might be a better name. The VH1 reality show, which will debut at 8 p.m. next Sunday, features the wives and daughters of wiseguys, including Karen Gravano, whose father, Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano, is one of the most infamous turncoats in underworld history. Ten episodes of the series, set in Staten Island, N.Y., are scheduled, and if the first is any indication, we're in for lots of shouting, cursing, and drama.
NEWS
April 3, 2011
George Parry is a former federal and state prosecutor practicing law in Philadelphia After spending the 1970s and '80s investigating and prosecuting organized crime, I thought I pretty well understood the mores of La Cosa Nostra. For example, it was clear to me that my generation of mobsters was completely indifferent to the subtleties of political correctness, especially when it came to the exquisite sensitivities of the feminist and gay communities. The old Mafiosi had real trouble getting in touch with their metrosexuality because, if it had existed, they would have blindfolded and strangled it. So it was with utter bewilderment that I read a newspaper account of a recent Mafia swearing-in where the button-man-to-be was forced to strip naked and wear a bathrobe while he took the oath of office.
NEWS
March 11, 2011
THERE'S a scene in "The Godfather, Part II" that used to make my Italian blood boil like a bubbling ragu. Michael Corleone is testifying before a Senate panel investigating organized crime. It's a cinematic recreation of the Kefauver or Valachi hearings that were aimed at dismantling the Mafia empire, one capo at a time. The committee chairman who questions Michael Corleone displays an ill-concealed contempt for people of Italian origin, even the ones who preferred pizza to pistols.
NEWS
September 16, 2009 | By George Parry
A recent Inquirer article detailed the near extinction of the Philadelphia family of La Cosa Nostra. From approximately 80 members in the 1980s, the Philadelphia mob has dwindled to roughly 20 "soldiers," of whom almost half are in prison. Philadelphia has but 10 mafiosi left to do the work that once took eight times as many. Law enforcement officials would have us believe that this is the result of good police work, but don't believe it. Like cockroaches, the mob cannot be eradicated once it moves in. No, there can be only one reason for this outcome: The mafia has departed for greener pastures.
NEWS
September 1, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Ligambi, reputed boss of the Philadelphia-South Jersey mob, heads a criminal organization that has nearly as many active members in jail as it does on the streets. Decimated by a 20-year onslaught of federal prosecutions, bloody internecine power struggles, and turncoat testimony, the local branch of La Cosa Nostra - which in the 1980s had roughly 80 members - now has a base of about 20 "soldiers. " And nine of them are in prison. Simply put, the Philadelphia Mafia has fallen on hard times.
NEWS
July 23, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators dubbed it "Operation Delco Nostra," and they said that for at least five years, the tentacles of Philadelphia's organized-crime network took a firm hold in Delaware County, engaging in illegal activities that included bookmaking, loan-sharking and drug-dealing. Yesterday, 17 defendants surrendered to authorities in Delaware County and Philadelphia on charges including solicitation to commit aggravated assault and conspiracy to commit perjury. The investigation also may have uncovered evidence of a rift in the organization, federal sources said.
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