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Labor Contract

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NEWS
July 14, 2004 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city and the union that represents Philadelphia's white-collar government workers agreed yesterday to extend their labor contract by a month as negotiators work out a new agreement. The contract covering the 3,400 members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees' District 47 expired July 1. A previous agreement extended it through today; yesterday's agreement leaves the contract in place through Aug. 15. "We made a lot of progress in the noneconomic areas," such as work rules, District Council 47 president Thomas Paine Cronin said of the negotiations to date.
SPORTS
May 20, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
The NFL's labor situation could get more complicated this week. The league's owners meet today in Atlanta and could vote to opt out of the labor contract. Such a move could signal a protracted period of labor tension and lead to a 2010 season without a salary cap and a potential work stoppage the following year. The owners have until Nov. 8 to terminate the contract. Some would prefer to do so now and hasten the way for talks toward a new agreement to replace the 2-year-old contract that most owners feel has tilted too far toward the players, who get 60 percent of total revenues.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Parents and students at the 17 Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are assured of at least one more year of labor peace. The 650 members of Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers on Wednesday approved a one-year contract that gives each a $1,200 yearly increase in salary starting this fall. "Both the association and the school system are pleased that these successful negotiations will provide assurances to the students and their parents that our schools will be poised for another year of success in September," according to a joint statement from the archdiocese and union president Rita Schwartz.
NEWS
August 28, 2004 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of the Burlington County Board of Social Services has been placed on paid leave pending the investigation of a complaint by an employee that he got rough with her during a labor-contract protest. The action against director Daniel Boas was taken after Daphne Ball filed a harassment complaint with Westampton police on Aug. 12, county officials said. The complaint stems from a confrontation on that date at the county human services facility on Woodlane Road in Mount Holly.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Union workers remained on the job at the Philadelphia Gas Works early today even though they failed to beat a midnight deadline for reaching a new contract with the utility. Talks were suspended about 10:30 last night when negotiators realized they would not reach an agreement by midnight. The two sides will meet today to discuss future negotiations. PGW, which employs 1,785 people, was reluctant to grant a second contract extension to Gas Works Employees Union Local 686, which represents 1,345 workers at the city-owned utility.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1992 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday cleared the way for After Six Inc. to sell its assets to a Baltimore company and close its Philadelphia tuxedo factory. The sale is scheduled to take place today. The Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, which represents more than 400 After Six workers, had sought a court injunction to block the sale until an arbitrator could rule on whether it would violate the union's contract. The union argued that the sale would violate its contract, which it said barred relocation.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police officers for the Delaware River Port Authority have a new labor contract, six years after the last one expired, but they are still waiting for most of their back pay. The new pact, awarded by an arbitrator after negotiations failed, provides for an average 1.77 percent annual pay increase over the life of the contract, from 2010 through 2017. The 131 patrol officers, sergeants, and corporals, whose last contract expired Dec. 31, 2009, had been seeking a 3.75 percent raise for each year.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's biggest labor contract expires Friday night, but an immediate strike by Philadelphia bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and maintenance workers seems unlikely. Negotiations between SEPTA and union representatives continued Wednesday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel. The contract with Transport Workers Union Local 234 covers about 4,700 SEPTA employees in the city, roughly half of all the transit agency's workers. Separate contracts expire next month with TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Victory District, which represents about 160 suburban maintenance and clerical employees; and TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Frontier District, which represents about 230 bus drivers and mechanics in Montgomery and Bucks Counties.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2012 | Paul Nussbaum
Flight attendants for Air Wisconsin, which operates as a US Airways Express carrier at Philadelphia International Airport, ratified a new labor contract with the airline Thursday, according to the union that represents the 300 flight attendants. Terms of the four-year pact were not disclosed, but the union said it included "increased compensation and improvements to scheduling and quality of life issues. " From hubs in Philadelphia, Washington, New York, Raleigh, N.C., and Norfolk, Va., Air Wisconsin operates nearly 500 daily flights as US Airways Express, serving 70 cities in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
June 27, 2015
An Associated Press story Thursday incorrectly reported that State Sen. Clementa Pinckney, who was killed in the Charleston church shootings, was the first African American since Reconstruction to rest in honor in South Carolina's Statehouse Rotunda. In 1986, the body of the astronaut Ronald McNair, who died in the space shuttle Challenger explosion, was given the same honor. A photo caption in some editions Wednesday gave the wrong name for a damaged car at Deptford Mall. It was a Nissan Altima.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police officers for the Delaware River Port Authority have a new labor contract, six years after the last one expired, but they are still waiting for most of their back pay. The new pact, awarded by an arbitrator after negotiations failed, provides for an average 1.77 percent annual pay increase over the life of the contract, from 2010 through 2017. The 131 patrol officers, sergeants, and corporals, whose last contract expired Dec. 31, 2009, had been seeking a 3.75 percent raise for each year.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
After reaching a tentative agreement for a two-year labor contract with the ownership of The Inquirer, the Daily News, and Philly.com on Friday night, the Newspaper Guild expects to hold a contract ratification vote in two weeks, Guild president Howard Gensler said. The union represents 445 employees at both papers and the website, including journalists, advertising sales representatives, and circulation personnel. Both sides agreed not to divulge terms of the new contract. During negotiations, they had clashed over seniority protection and health-care costs.
NEWS
June 27, 2015
An Associated Press story Thursday incorrectly reported that State Sen. Clementa Pinckney, who was killed in the Charleston church shootings, was the first African American since Reconstruction to rest in honor in South Carolina's Statehouse Rotunda. In 1986, the body of the astronaut Ronald McNair, who died in the space shuttle Challenger explosion, was given the same honor. A photo caption in some editions Wednesday gave the wrong name for a damaged car at Deptford Mall. It was a Nissan Altima.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teachers at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's 17 high schools voted Wednesday to ratify a one-year labor contract. The contract provides the union's 625 members with $1,350 salary raises. A previous contract, which only guaranteed $1,200 raises, was rejected unanimously at a May 27 meeting. The average Catholic high school teacher has 20 years of experience and is paid $49,000 annually. Rita Schwartz, president of Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers, said her members rejected the original contract because the pay raise did not cover increasing medical insurance premiums.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the union representing teachers at its 17 high schools announced Friday they had reached a tentative agreement on a new labor contract. The deal is subject to a ratification vote, which is expected later this month, by 635 members of Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers. Details on the tentative contract were not released, but the teachers in May rejected a proposed one-year deal because, they said, the wage increases that were offered would not cover the increase in health-care costs.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he abruptly resigned from the state House last month, Joe Hackett said he was returning to an $85,290-a-year job with the Delaware County District Attorney's Office after a five-year leave of absence. However, in response to an Inquirer request, the county's open-record office said Tuesday that it had no record that Hackett applied for an extended leave beyond the one granted for his first two years in office under the labor contract between the Fraternal Order of Police and the county.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
About two dozen members of parent advocacy groups and their supporters rallied Wednesday outside Philadelphia School District headquarters to protest last week's canceling of the labor contract with the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Under cloudy skies, they scolded the School Reform Commission over its unprecedented unilateral action. Cheri Honkala, 53, an antipoverty advocate and the parent of a child who recently graduated from Moffet Elementary, a K-5 school in North Philadelphia, said the commission underestimated the will of district parents.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bid in bankruptcy court to set aside a labor contract for 1,136 employees at Atlantic City's Trump Taj Mahal casino has set up a pitched battle between Unite Here Local 54 and Carl Icahn. Icahn, a billionaire investor known for taking control of financially distressed businesses by buying debt at a discount, controls the fate of Trump Entertainment Resorts because he owns $286 million in first-lien debt and stands first in line to be paid in any bankruptcy deal. As a condition of keeping Trump Taj Mahal open, Icahn wants massive concessions from labor and government.
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