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Labor Contract

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NEWS
July 14, 2004 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city and the union that represents Philadelphia's white-collar government workers agreed yesterday to extend their labor contract by a month as negotiators work out a new agreement. The contract covering the 3,400 members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees' District 47 expired July 1. A previous agreement extended it through today; yesterday's agreement leaves the contract in place through Aug. 15. "We made a lot of progress in the noneconomic areas," such as work rules, District Council 47 president Thomas Paine Cronin said of the negotiations to date.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Parents and students at the 17 Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are assured of at least one more year of labor peace. The 650 members of Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers on Wednesday approved a one-year contract that gives each a $1,200 yearly increase in salary starting this fall. "Both the association and the school system are pleased that these successful negotiations will provide assurances to the students and their parents that our schools will be poised for another year of success in September," according to a joint statement from the archdiocese and union president Rita Schwartz.
SPORTS
May 20, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
The NFL's labor situation could get more complicated this week. The league's owners meet today in Atlanta and could vote to opt out of the labor contract. Such a move could signal a protracted period of labor tension and lead to a 2010 season without a salary cap and a potential work stoppage the following year. The owners have until Nov. 8 to terminate the contract. Some would prefer to do so now and hasten the way for talks toward a new agreement to replace the 2-year-old contract that most owners feel has tilted too far toward the players, who get 60 percent of total revenues.
NEWS
August 28, 2004 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of the Burlington County Board of Social Services has been placed on paid leave pending the investigation of a complaint by an employee that he got rough with her during a labor-contract protest. The action against director Daniel Boas was taken after Daphne Ball filed a harassment complaint with Westampton police on Aug. 12, county officials said. The complaint stems from a confrontation on that date at the county human services facility on Woodlane Road in Mount Holly.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Union workers remained on the job at the Philadelphia Gas Works early today even though they failed to beat a midnight deadline for reaching a new contract with the utility. Talks were suspended about 10:30 last night when negotiators realized they would not reach an agreement by midnight. The two sides will meet today to discuss future negotiations. PGW, which employs 1,785 people, was reluctant to grant a second contract extension to Gas Works Employees Union Local 686, which represents 1,345 workers at the city-owned utility.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1992 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday cleared the way for After Six Inc. to sell its assets to a Baltimore company and close its Philadelphia tuxedo factory. The sale is scheduled to take place today. The Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, which represents more than 400 After Six workers, had sought a court injunction to block the sale until an arbitrator could rule on whether it would violate the union's contract. The union argued that the sale would violate its contract, which it said barred relocation.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia-area commuters, the possibility of a first-ever transit strike by all SEPTA union workers could loom large when a federally mandated mediation process for Regional Rail engineers expires later this year. After that, the engineers, who have been working without a new contract since 2010, would be permitted to strike. SEPTA's labor contract with city bus drivers and subway operators has already expired, and contracts with suburban operators and mechanics will expire in early April.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2012 | Paul Nussbaum
Flight attendants for Air Wisconsin, which operates as a US Airways Express carrier at Philadelphia International Airport, ratified a new labor contract with the airline Thursday, according to the union that represents the 300 flight attendants. Terms of the four-year pact were not disclosed, but the union said it included "increased compensation and improvements to scheduling and quality of life issues. " From hubs in Philadelphia, Washington, New York, Raleigh, N.C., and Norfolk, Va., Air Wisconsin operates nearly 500 daily flights as US Airways Express, serving 70 cities in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
No legacy for Nutter? Many people have questioned what Mayor Nutter's legacy will be when he is finally out of City Hall. Some are concerned that he might not leave a good legacy. I believe, on the other hand, that he will not leave a legacy at all. After all, it is during his administration that he has tried to close the public libraries and has shortened their hours, then during his administration with his appointed school district CEO, many of the public schools have been closed.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's biggest labor contract expires Friday night, but an immediate strike by Philadelphia bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and maintenance workers seems unlikely. Negotiations between SEPTA and union representatives continued Wednesday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel. The contract with Transport Workers Union Local 234 covers about 4,700 SEPTA employees in the city, roughly half of all the transit agency's workers. Separate contracts expire next month with TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Victory District, which represents about 160 suburban maintenance and clerical employees; and TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Frontier District, which represents about 230 bus drivers and mechanics in Montgomery and Bucks Counties.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Parents and students at the 17 Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are assured of at least one more year of labor peace. The 650 members of Local 1776 of the Association of Catholic Teachers on Wednesday approved a one-year contract that gives each a $1,200 yearly increase in salary starting this fall. "Both the association and the school system are pleased that these successful negotiations will provide assurances to the students and their parents that our schools will be poised for another year of success in September," according to a joint statement from the archdiocese and union president Rita Schwartz.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia-area commuters, the possibility of a first-ever transit strike by all SEPTA union workers could loom large when a federally mandated mediation process for Regional Rail engineers expires later this year. After that, the engineers, who have been working without a new contract since 2010, would be permitted to strike. SEPTA's labor contract with city bus drivers and subway operators has already expired, and contracts with suburban operators and mechanics will expire in early April.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration's recent labor contract with AFSCME District Council 47 includes a previously undisclosed side letter committing the city to improving the package if the city provides a better deal to the union's bigger counterpart, AFSCME District Council 33. The brief letter was written by the city's chief negotiator, lawyer Shannon D. Farmer, to Frederick Wright, the D.C. 47 president, on March 5, the day that the white-collar union...
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's biggest labor contract expires Friday night, but an immediate strike by Philadelphia bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and maintenance workers seems unlikely. Negotiations between SEPTA and union representatives continued Wednesday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel. The contract with Transport Workers Union Local 234 covers about 4,700 SEPTA employees in the city, roughly half of all the transit agency's workers. Separate contracts expire next month with TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Victory District, which represents about 160 suburban maintenance and clerical employees; and TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Frontier District, which represents about 230 bus drivers and mechanics in Montgomery and Bucks Counties.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timing their protest to Mayor Nutter's annual budget address, scores of unionized municipal workers marched outside City Hall today to decry a lack of a labor contract and the proposed sale of PGW. Jeering union protesters last year prevent Nutter from addressing Council, prompting him to deliver the budget message later in the day from a heavily guarded the Mayor Reception Room. The protesters dispersed about 10:30 a.m. and some entered City Hall, where a number were admitted to the Council chambers gallery for Nutter's speech without their signs and a with a warning against outbursts.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
No legacy for Nutter? Many people have questioned what Mayor Nutter's legacy will be when he is finally out of City Hall. Some are concerned that he might not leave a good legacy. I believe, on the other hand, that he will not leave a legacy at all. After all, it is during his administration that he has tried to close the public libraries and has shortened their hours, then during his administration with his appointed school district CEO, many of the public schools have been closed.
SPORTS
July 26, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE NEW YORK Yankees intend to discipline Alex Rodriguez for seeking a second medical opinion on his injured leg without their permission, a person familiar with the team's deliberations said yesterday. The exact penalty had not yet been determined, the person said, speaking on condition of anonymity to the Associated Press because no statements were authorized. A fine appeared to be the most likely option. Under baseball's labor contract, a player must notify his team in writing if he intends to seek a second medical opinion.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Terry Collins, Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif. - Commuter rail service resumed Friday in the San Francisco Bay Area after unions called off a strike and agreed to extend a labor contract for a month while bargaining continues. Thirty-five trains were put back in service in time for an expected light evening commute, the Bay Area Rapid Transit agency said. Frances DeLoach of Oakland was among the dozens of commuters who lined up at the West Oakland station for the first trains to San Francisco after nearly five days without service.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MEMBERS of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia on Thursday night approved a new two-year labor contract with the owners of the Daily News , Inquirer and Philly.com. The deal with Interstate General Media LLC includes a 2.5 percent across-the-board wage cut but assures that the company will continue to publish both papers for at least the next two years. The vote was 200- 35. The ratification meeting was held at the Hilton Garden Inn at 11th and Arch streets, but many of the Guild's 550 members voted by email.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The union representing mailers at The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News overwhelmingly approved a new two-year labor contract with Interstate General Media L.L.C. Sunday, a company official said. The union representing paper handlers, however, rejected a tentative agreement on Friday. The handlers are scheduled for another vote Monday. Interstate General Media, parent company of The Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com, reached a tentative agreement on a new contract Thursday with the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia, largest of its 11 unions, a key step in the company's efforts to return to profitability.
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