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NEWS
December 3, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Question: November's unemployment rate dropped to its lowest point since March 2009, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. Why isn't that good news? Answer: It is good news, but it isn't great news. The unemployment rate is a ratio that accounts for two numbers - the number of unemployed as a percentage of the number of people in the labor force. In November, the number of unemployed people dropped 594,000, and the labor force fell 315,000 people. So, in the entire pool of workers, fewer were unemployed.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | By Jeff Nesbit, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The secretaries of Labor and Education agreed yesterday to support a controversial proposal to merge vocational education with federal job-training programs in an effort to cope with a large and growing unskilled labor force. Both programs are aimed at bringing unemployed, economically disadvantaged and dislocated workers into the job market, with the help of private business. Testifying before a Senate Labor subcommittee, Labor Secretary William E. Brock 3d and Education Secretary William J. Bennett acknowledged that federal programs to train and educate the nation's labor force are not working well.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2013
It may be hard to believe, but it really is the improving economy that is driving down unemployment rates. The economy is getting better, so why are so many people distrustful of the government data? The question I am asked most often is: "Do you really think the unemployment rate is accurate?" The measure that is supposed to describe the status of the labor market is now assumed by many to misstate its true condition. The reality is that the number does a good job of summarizing things.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's April unemployment rate dropped below 9 percent - to 8.7 percent - marking its lowest point in four years, the state's Department of Labor and Industry reported Thursday. A gain of 4,100 private-sector jobs offset a loss of 800 public-sector jobs, including scores of Camden police officers laid off last month when a county force took over policing the city. While New Jersey's rate has fallen, it still tops the nation's, which was 7.5 percent in April. To the Christie administration, the report, coupled with another showing better-than-expected increases in revenues from income, corporate, and sales taxes, points to an economy on the upward track.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By Alex Kowalski, Bloomberg News
The unexpected drop of the unemployment rate to a three-year low has overshadowed a less-positive labor-market development: Fewer Americans are looking for work. Last week's Labor Department announcement that the jobless rate fell to 8.3 percent in January sent stocks and bond yields higher. The same report showed the share of working-age people in the labor force had declined to the lowest level in 29 years. The so-called participation rate was cited by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke on Tuesday to support his assessment that the rate of unemployment obscures vulnerabilities in the job market.
NEWS
December 4, 2002 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of new immigrants helped Pennsylvania and New Jersey avoid potentially steep labor shortages during the 1990s, according to a new study that saw similar trends in other states with many immigrants. New immigrants accounted for 40 percent of Pennsylvania's labor-force growth between 1990 and 2001, compared with 50 percent nationwide, according to an analysis of census and government data prepared by researchers at Northeastern University in Boston. Immigrant men accounted for all growth in Pennsylvania's male labor force, compared with 79 percent nationwide, the study, which was released this week, found.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | BY JOSEPH M. EGAN JR
Philadelphia faces new realities and new challenges in the field of economic development. It becomes more evident that economic development is no longer simply a matter of providing utilities, streets, water and financing. Rather, effective economic development is a model for the complex social and economic issues facing our urban centers. In order to foster and expand economic development in this environment, all major issues facing our labor force must be adequately addressed.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
TRUTH IN ADVERTISING Is seeing really believing? In a random-sample survey, based on calls to 600 households, 75 percent of the respondents said they found all or some TV ads unbelievable and 70 percent were equally incredulous about print ads. But Advertising Age magazine says that when respondents were asked to watch specific commercials, only 10 percent identified any that lacked credibility. OLD HANDS America may be graying, but its workforce sure isn't. The percentage of older people in the U.S. labor force, defined as those working or actively looking for work, has declined over the years, according to the American Association of Retired Persons.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | By George F. Will
Since the 1950s, when the conservative movement coalesced out of many exasperations, conservatism has been on a long march, transforming itself from an ideology of protest to a philosophy of governance. Another small step in that direction is Sen. Orrin G. Hatch's decision to act on the fact that Ozzie and Harriet are as gone as tail fins. Hatch represents the most Reaganite state (Utah voted 78 percent for Reagan in 1980, 68 percent in 1984). His is high-octane conservatism. Thus it is a large straw in a strong wind that he has introduced a plan for enlarged federal involvement in the provision of child care.
NEWS
June 6, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Sonja Ryst INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The nation's unemployment rate rose to 9.4 percent in May, the highest in more than 25 years. Yet, there is evidence that the recession is loosening its grip: Employers cut 345,000 jobs, the fewest since September, the Labor Department reported. You can blame new college graduates such as Aneika Fermin, 22, for the rising unemployment rate. Even though she will officially join the labor force after she graduates next week, she has been looking for a job for months. "I put myself out there," said Fermin, a marketing major at Drexel University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doldrums continued in the U.S. labor market in August with the nation's payrolls adding 169,000 jobs - not enough, or fast enough, to move the needle much for the nation's 4.3 million long-term unemployed. The unemployment rate declined slightly to 7.3 percent, the lowest rate in nearly five years, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. "The drop in the employment rate is bogus," said Ryan Sweet, an economist with Moody's Analytics in West Chester. "It's attributable to people - teenagers and older people - leaving the labor force.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MARK MERCER had filled out more job applications than he could count, and after two years of trying to snag a steady gig the old-fashioned way, he decided in June to try a new approach. Decked out in black shoes and a black suit - the only one he owns - Mercer stands almost daily in the heart of the city's financial district, on the southeast corner of 19th and Market streets, with a stack of resumes and a huge sign: I Don't Want Your Change. I NEED A JOB. Mercer, 54, was fired in 2011 after four years in a customer-service job in Bucks County for refusing to yell at a technician, he said.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2013
It may be hard to believe, but it really is the improving economy that is driving down unemployment rates. The economy is getting better, so why are so many people distrustful of the government data? The question I am asked most often is: "Do you really think the unemployment rate is accurate?" The measure that is supposed to describe the status of the labor market is now assumed by many to misstate its true condition. The reality is that the number does a good job of summarizing things.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's April unemployment rate dropped below 9 percent - to 8.7 percent - marking its lowest point in four years, the state's Department of Labor and Industry reported Thursday. A gain of 4,100 private-sector jobs offset a loss of 800 public-sector jobs, including scores of Camden police officers laid off last month when a county force took over policing the city. While New Jersey's rate has fallen, it still tops the nation's, which was 7.5 percent in April. To the Christie administration, the report, coupled with another showing better-than-expected increases in revenues from income, corporate, and sales taxes, points to an economy on the upward track.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In 1935, Time magazine ran an article titled "Maniacal Wives. " It actually focused on ex-wives, who were allegedly bleeding their former spouses dry out of a mix of greed and vindictiveness. According to the author, 69 percent of the ex-wives he studied were "suffering from psychoses bordering on sadism. " Spend a few minutes trolling through the blog posts of New Jersey divorce-reform activists, and you might conclude that vengeful women are still taking hapless men to the cleaners.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Charles Murray
Coming Apart, the book I published a few months ago, tracks the cultural divergences in America's classes from 1960 to 2010, focusing on whites as a way of getting people to understand that the problems I describe aren't driven by minorities. I used Belmont, an affluent Boston suburb, as my label for the white upper middle class, and Fishtown, referring to Philadelphia's own Fishtown, one of the oldest white working-class communities in America, as my label for the white working class.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By Alex Kowalski, Bloomberg News
The unexpected drop of the unemployment rate to a three-year low has overshadowed a less-positive labor-market development: Fewer Americans are looking for work. Last week's Labor Department announcement that the jobless rate fell to 8.3 percent in January sent stocks and bond yields higher. The same report showed the share of working-age people in the labor force had declined to the lowest level in 29 years. The so-called participation rate was cited by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke on Tuesday to support his assessment that the rate of unemployment obscures vulnerabilities in the job market.
NEWS
December 3, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Question: November's unemployment rate dropped to its lowest point since March 2009, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. Why isn't that good news? Answer: It is good news, but it isn't great news. The unemployment rate is a ratio that accounts for two numbers - the number of unemployed as a percentage of the number of people in the labor force. In November, the number of unemployed people dropped 594,000, and the labor force fell 315,000 people. So, in the entire pool of workers, fewer were unemployed.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | By Brian Hickey
My mom was a travel agent. My dad worked as a letter carrier, among other jobs within the U.S. Postal Service. And I, obviously, am a journalist. All that should make one thing abundantly clear: My family deeply understands what happens when technology rises up and wages war on professions. I needn't delve much deeper than mentioning the proliferation of book-your-own-trip Web sites or the suffering and/or closing of newspapers. The lesson learned is that you can't outmaneuver inevitabilities.
NEWS
June 6, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Sonja Ryst INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The nation's unemployment rate rose to 9.4 percent in May, the highest in more than 25 years. Yet, there is evidence that the recession is loosening its grip: Employers cut 345,000 jobs, the fewest since September, the Labor Department reported. You can blame new college graduates such as Aneika Fermin, 22, for the rising unemployment rate. Even though she will officially join the labor force after she graduates next week, she has been looking for a job for months. "I put myself out there," said Fermin, a marketing major at Drexel University.
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