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Labor History

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NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
PORTLAND, Maine - The president of Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts sent a scathing letter Tuesday to Maine Gov. Paul LePage for removing a labor-themed mural from the Department of Labor headquarters. The artwork remained in limbo, its location a secret. The 36-foot-long mural was taken down over the weekend after LePage said it was biased in favor of organized labor and wasn't in line with his pro-business agenda. The mural was installed in 2008 and depicts Maine's long labor history, with images of mill workers, labor strikes, and child laborers among its scenes.
NEWS
September 7, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ronn Shaffer is not an authority on the history of labor, and he's never belonged to a union. But the 71-year-old semiretired businessman does know a thing or two about the landmark 1806 trial, Commonwealth v. George Pullis, et al., in which a band of brazen shoemakers who organized to demand higher wages were convicted of criminal conspiracy. He also has a great story about the time he wrote a letter to Chicago's Mayor Richard Daley in the 1970s and how he learned the power of treating union workers with respect.
NEWS
October 19, 2000 | By Susan Snyder and Cynthia Burton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The president of the Philadelphia teachers' union plans to address the Board of Education on Monday night, and he might announce a strike, possibly beginning at the end of that week. "It is certainly one of the options, but no decision has been made," said Deborah Willig, a lawyer for the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. President Ted Kirsch said yesterday that he would make "a major announcement" at the board's meeting, beginning at 7 p.m. at Central High School, and he has invited his 21,000 members to be there.
NEWS
August 28, 1986
Alice-Leone Moats railed at feminists for criticizing Rosalind Rosenberg, the historian who recently testified in behalf of Sears in a sex discrimination suit filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, but her comments do little to clarify the case. The criticism of Ms. Rosenberg for her actions has not been generated in order to impose some rigid feminist line. Instead it centers on concrete issues - particularly the use of historical evidence. Several of the critics Miss Moats cites are scholars who, unlike Ms. Rosenberg, have spent years studying the history of wage-earning women.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Alexander Saxton, 93, who would go on to become a prominent historian of race in America, summed himself up in a blurb on the dust jacket of his first novel, Grand Crossings , published when he was 24. He said, he had worked as "a harvest hand, construction gang laborer, engine-wiper, freight brakeman, architectural apprentice, assistant to the assistant editor" of a union newspaper, railroad switchman, and Daily Worker columnist. Unmentioned were his upbringing in a Manhattan household where Thornton Wilder and Aldous Huxley were frequent dinner guests, and his schooling at Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard.
NEWS
August 9, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward Feehan, 81, of Levittown, whose mediation skills were credited with resolving some of Philadelphia's thorniest labor disputes, died Saturday after a long illness.. Mr. Feehan won widespread praise as a state mediator for leading negotiations that ended major strikes in the 1970s and 1980s, including a five-day SEPTA strike in March 1986 that brought Philadelphia's transit system to a halt. Colleagues and observers said that when it came to negotiating, Mr. Feehan had the golden touch: He had an almost encyclopedic knowledge of the area's labor history and brought a sense of credibility, diplomacy and fairness to every bargaining table.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | By KEITH M. ROCKWELL
The decision by British Prime Minister John Major to keep Britain out of the "social charter" of the treaty agreed to in Maastricht has reopened the debate on how a unified Europe will deal with its workforce. Since 1980, the European Commission - the European Community's executive body - has sought to include labor in its various measures aimed at creating a more unified Europe. As part of the 1992 single market program, Commission President Jacques Delors proposed a social charter in 1989.
SPORTS
October 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Striking members of the New York Mets and Yankees had a warning for any potential strikebreakers at spring training next year: Do so at your own peril. "I'm sitting out, I'm losing a ton of money, so if you cross the line it might be a tough go for you," said pitcher John Franco, a Mets player representative. Asked if that meant knockdown pitches, Franco replied, "I don't throw balls. I throw fists. " Some owners have said they may open camps for spring training and invite minor leaguers and any roster players who want to break ranks.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In case it goes down as a pivotal moment in U.S. labor history, let the record show that the strike that rattled the golden arches began with this somber exchange, between two friends reeking of fry grease, in a car outside a McDonald's midway between Cleveland and Akron. Bryan Drapp, 19, the outspoken one, hands on the steering wheel: "I wanna strike. " Jamal Nickens, 20, the quiet one, staring out the window: "I dunno, dude. I really need the money. " The two clean-cut University of Akron freshmen had long been disturbed by supervisors' inconsiderate treatment of employees.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis,Maria Panaritis,and Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Every legislative session for the last 14 years, State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe has worked the Capitol hallways to make Pennsylvania a "right-to-work" state. Every time, the conservative Republican has seen his bills languish, not even mustering enough momentum for a committee vote. "It's an uphill battle," Metcalfe, of Butler County, told The Inquirer on Wednesday. "Like pretty much any issue that threatens the power of the union bosses, it is quickly attacked and stifled.
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NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Maria Panaritis, and Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Every legislative session for the last 14 years, State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe has worked the Capitol hallways to make Pennsylvania a "right-to-work" state. Every time, the conservative Republican has seen his bills languish, not even mustering enough momentum for a committee vote. "It's an uphill battle," Metcalfe, of Butler County, told The Inquirer on Wednesday. "Like pretty much any issue that threatens the power of the union bosses, it is quickly attacked and stifled.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Alexander Saxton, 93, who would go on to become a prominent historian of race in America, summed himself up in a blurb on the dust jacket of his first novel, Grand Crossings , published when he was 24. He said, he had worked as "a harvest hand, construction gang laborer, engine-wiper, freight brakeman, architectural apprentice, assistant to the assistant editor" of a union newspaper, railroad switchman, and Daily Worker columnist. Unmentioned were his upbringing in a Manhattan household where Thornton Wilder and Aldous Huxley were frequent dinner guests, and his schooling at Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
PORTLAND, Maine - The president of Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts sent a scathing letter Tuesday to Maine Gov. Paul LePage for removing a labor-themed mural from the Department of Labor headquarters. The artwork remained in limbo, its location a secret. The 36-foot-long mural was taken down over the weekend after LePage said it was biased in favor of organized labor and wasn't in line with his pro-business agenda. The mural was installed in 2008 and depicts Maine's long labor history, with images of mill workers, labor strikes, and child laborers among its scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010
By Ivan Doig Riverhead. 288 pp. $25.95 By Karen Sandstrom In his new book, Seattle novelist Ivan Doig delivers a concentrated dose of the learned and genial Morrie Morgan, whom readers first met in the 2006 crowd-pleaser The Whistling Season , in which Morrie found himself teaching in a small Montana schoolhouse. Work Song is more Morrie's tale this time as protagonist and narrator of a story set in 1919 Butte, Mont., where he has come with hopes of earning a few bucks from the copper mine with his bookkeeping skills.
NEWS
September 7, 2009 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For union activist Kathy Brady, it's a labor of love for the labor movement and for Elmwood Park, a green oasis built for working-class residents in Southwest Philadelphia. Since 2005, Brady, a union organizer with Service Employees International Union, has been working to raise nearly $500,000 to install a monument to the labor movement at the seven-acre park, at 71st Street and Buist Avenue. She has been joined by members of the Friends of Elmwood Park and the Fairmount Park Arts Association.
NEWS
September 7, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ronn Shaffer is not an authority on the history of labor, and he's never belonged to a union. But the 71-year-old semiretired businessman does know a thing or two about the landmark 1806 trial, Commonwealth v. George Pullis, et al., in which a band of brazen shoemakers who organized to demand higher wages were convicted of criminal conspiracy. He also has a great story about the time he wrote a letter to Chicago's Mayor Richard Daley in the 1970s and how he learned the power of treating union workers with respect.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2005 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaning on a cane, his gait halting, Wendell Young 3d made his way to the speakers' microphone Wednesday at the AFL-CIO convention. By all rights, he shouldn't have been there. But then, in his 40-plus years as a labor leader in Philadelphia, Young, 67, has been nothing but defiant. His union, the United Food and Commercial Workers, had boycotted the convention and was threatening to quit the AFL-CIO, as two other unions had done two days earlier in a historic and bitter split.
NEWS
August 9, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward Feehan, 81, of Levittown, whose mediation skills were credited with resolving some of Philadelphia's thorniest labor disputes, died Saturday after a long illness.. Mr. Feehan won widespread praise as a state mediator for leading negotiations that ended major strikes in the 1970s and 1980s, including a five-day SEPTA strike in March 1986 that brought Philadelphia's transit system to a halt. Colleagues and observers said that when it came to negotiating, Mr. Feehan had the golden touch: He had an almost encyclopedic knowledge of the area's labor history and brought a sense of credibility, diplomacy and fairness to every bargaining table.
NEWS
October 19, 2000 | By Susan Snyder and Cynthia Burton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The president of the Philadelphia teachers' union plans to address the Board of Education on Monday night, and he might announce a strike, possibly beginning at the end of that week. "It is certainly one of the options, but no decision has been made," said Deborah Willig, a lawyer for the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. President Ted Kirsch said yesterday that he would make "a major announcement" at the board's meeting, beginning at 7 p.m. at Central High School, and he has invited his 21,000 members to be there.
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