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Labor Movement

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NEWS
August 5, 1991 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Juravich's schedule for this year reads like a news summary of worker troubles in the '90s. It's Independence Day, and there's a rally in Maine, where angry state workers are on furlough because legislators can't pass a budget. Juravich, a baritone with a woolly, graying beard, crystallizes the moment in a song, "We Want Our Paychecks. " Late July, back home in Philadelphia, he stirs up demonstrating state social service workers with a few choruses of "No More Cutbacks.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Awesome night," said Stephani Passaro, 21, shivering as she ducked into a minivan after a cold night knocking on doors this week in Bensalem's suburban cul-de-sacs to talk about issues affecting working families. It was awesome. No dogs chased Passaro and her nine fellow canvassers. Hardly anyone slammed doors on them, and they signed up 275 members to Working America, a 1.2-million-member grassroots affiliate of the AFL-CIO, the nation's largest federation of labor unions. Passaro had never been in a labor union and neither has the van's driver, canvass leader Chris West, 25. Nor has Donna Covely, 44, a Bensalem nurse, one of 275 who joined Thursday.
NEWS
August 29, 2008
LABOR DAY is the day we honor the American workforce. Let us recognize the contributions that labor has made for our great nation and the impact that it has in our everyday lives. On this great day for labor, come join the proud people of the working class as we march down Columbus Boulevard carrying our banners and waving our flags celebrating the past, present and future of the labor movement. Tony Mastrome Philadelphia
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | By Joseph F. Wilson
As the attack on the working class rages on, we need to focus attention on the alarming shift in wealth taking place in this country. The gap between rich and poor is growing fast. Average workers have seen their wages stagnating, their benefits reduced, their standard of living lowered, and their jobs and future clouded with fear and uncertainty. Corporations flush with profits are destroying jobs in the name of higher profits. Past corporate success meant good news for all from the CEO on down.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | JUANA ANDERSON/ DAILY NEWS
John Morris, president of the Pennsylvania Conference of Teamsters, said last week it was time to revive the labor movement in Philadelphia, urging union members to take part in yesterday's Labor Day Parade, which kicked off from JFK Plaza at 15th Street and ended with a rally at the Judge Lewis Quadrangle at 5th and Market streets. "We have to go back to the old days of pride. We have to help ourselves because we can't look to anybody else to help us, " Morris had said. "It's time for working people to stick together.
NEWS
October 11, 2002
Every worker whose workplace is safer than it used to be owes some gratitude to the life-long efforts of Anthony Mazzocchi. He died last week at his Washington home at 76. A true hero of the nation's labor movement, Mr. Mazzocchi worked for decades to improve the lot of workers, from winning one of the nation's first employee dental plans to negotiating equal pay for women at a New York factory where he worked in the 1950s. A long-time member of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers union, Mr. Mazzocchi helped form a coalition between the union and environmental movements to press for occupational safety.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Tens of thousands of metalworkers went on strike throughout South Africa today despite a last-minute bid by management and government to head off the stoppage by making it illegal, a union spokesman said. "As far as we are concerned, all of our (80,000) members are on strike," said Peter Daantjies, spokesman for the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa which called the strike in a dispute over wages and working conditions. This morning, the government issued a special gazette that extended the workers' just-expired contract and had the effect of making the strike illegal.
NEWS
January 14, 2009 | By WILLIAM F. KELLER
President-elect Obama will face many controversial decisions when he's sworn in as our nation's 44th president on Jan. 20. From the perspectives of the national labor movement and big-business owners, perhaps no decision is more hotly anticipated than the fate of the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA). The ultimate decision will dramatically affect, for better or for worse, the future of America's struggling middle class. EFCA would enable working people to bargain for better wages, benefits and working conditions by restoring workers' freedom to choose for themselves whether to join a union.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | BY ARTHUR B. SHOSTAK
Yesterday's fourth annual regional Labor Day and Family Celebration signals a positive turn in the fortunes of the Philadelphia-area labor movement and an end to the doom and gloom of the Reagan '80s. This year's vastly expanded parade included representaives from more than 125 locals, up from just under 100 last year. Mummers string bands and drill teams, along with scores of colorful floats and high-spirited marching delegations underscored the upbeat mood of this 104th aniversary of Labor Day. Labor has much to cheer about in 1991, and the Delaware Valley labor movement has proudly been part of the action.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It seems evident from his critical tone that James Asher is no friend of the organized labor movement in general and of the International Longshoremen's Association in particular. His Aug. 25 article regarding the longshoremen's contract is not without journalistic bias. Moreover, to say that "it is not unusual to find longshoremen earning between $78,000 and $100,000" implies a norm that is erroneous and very misleading. Such a statement, to say the least, needs to be qualified, for surely such persons constitute a very small percentage of the total rank and file membership.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of labor news in the last three weeks - and in some ways, the 21,000-member union local led by Wendell Young 4th has been at the heart of all of it. On Feb. 19, for example, Walmart announced it would raise minimum wages for its workers to $9 an hour starting in April. In Philadelphia, and across the nation, the United Food and Commercial Workers union has spent at least the last two decades pressuring Walmart on its wage policies. On Feb. 26, the Pennsylvania House voted to privatize the state's liquor stores.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
They might not like Yuengling. But the Teamsters evidently are drunk in love with Gov.-elect Tom Wolf. A day after State Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) said that Wolf's inauguration planners were excluding Yuengling, the Pottsville-based brew, from his inaugural celebration, the leader of Teamsters Local 830 sent out a news release praising the incoming governor - and teeing off on the brewery's president, Richard Yuengling Jr., whom the union has long described as "anti-worker.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outraged by the School Reform Commission's decision to cancel its collective bargaining agreement with Philadelphia public school teachers, city labor leaders contemplated calling for a general strike. In two meetings, last Thursday and Sunday, labor leaders debated the wisdom of asking members of all area unions - laborers, electricians, communications workers, janitors, nurses, bus drivers, city employees - to walk off their jobs to protest the SRC's decision. "If there is going to be a fight, we have to fight about the future, and the kids are the future," said Henry Nicholas, president of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, headquartered in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
May 12, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
A prominent plaque at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum contains this familiar quotation from French-born historian Jacques Barzun: "Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball. " Sadly, it's in a museum, surrounded by other relics, where Barzun's 1954 observation belongs. The long-held notion that America is reflected in its onetime pastime is, in 2014, as passé as a slap-hitter. In fact, when it comes to baseball and the new national reality, the opposite is often true.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Abington, Frederick Wright learned about the labor movement at the knee of his father, a union millwright at the U.S. Steel plant in Fairless Hills. He also learned about management from his father, who on the side operated a landscaping company that employed Wright and his older brother. One summer, his brother was put in charge of collecting payments. Once his brother realized how much money their father was making and how little they were being paid, he dispatched Frederick to ask for raises.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some of Philadelphia's biggest unions and their political allies came together Monday in an unusual show of solidarity against a common enemy: Mayor Nutter. Ostensibly, the all-star roster of labor and political heavyweights gathered to announce an effort to amend the City Charter. The change, which would have to be put to voters, would bar the mayor from challenging an arbitration award without permission from Council. Many of the speakers used the event to castigate Nutter and trumpet a newfound bond between unions that have not always worked in concert.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wendell W. Young III, 74, of Lafayette Hill, president emeritus of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1776 and an influential labor leader in Pennsylvania for many years, died of liver cancer Tuesday, Jan. 1, at his home. Mr. Young started at age 16 as a part-time clerk at the Acme Market at Adams Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard near his family's rowhouse in the Northeast. After his father encouraged him to get involved in the union, Mr. Young's coworkers elected him shop steward.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wendell W. Young III, 74, of Lafayette Hill, president emeritus of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1776 and an influential labor leader in Pennsylvania for many years, died of liver cancer Tuesday, Jan. 1, at his home. Mr. Young started at age 16 as a part-time clerk at the Acme Market at Adams Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard near his family's rowhouse in the Northeast. After his father encouraged him to get involved in the union, Mr. Young's coworkers elected him shop steward.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer
THE RAIN came down hard and steady at times during the city's 25th annual Labor Day parade Monday, but the downpours did nothing to dampen the fire and indignation felt by many marchers toward the Republican Party and their newest bogeyman - Mayor Nutter. "Nutter the Dictator," and "Nutter Doesn't Negotiate He Dictates," read signs that dozens of soggy union members carried while trooping down Columbus Boulevard toward a picnic at Penn's Landing. An estimated 5,000 union faithful and their families participated, representing about 50 unions, said Liz McElroy, the newly elected secretary-treasurer of Philadelphia Council AFL-CIO.
NEWS
September 5, 2011
Labor entrepreneur Fabricio Rodriguez, 37, didn't come up the traditional way through the rank-and-file of an official AFL-CIO labor union, yet he started two worker organizations. One now represents security guards at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His latest venture is the Philadelphia Restaurant Opportunity Center, an advocacy group. Just in time for Labor Day, Rodriguez spoke with Inquirer staff writer Jane M. Von Bergen about fighting for workers.   Question: You were a high school dropout who drifted from job to job. But while working with your father in a mine in Alaska, you had an experience that led you to get an education and advocate for workers.
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