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Lacrosse Sticks

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NEWS
June 24, 1996 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Under an arch of interlocking lacrosse sticks held aloft by her teary-eyed teammates, All-American Aimee Willard made her final run at 9:28 p.m. last night. Just seconds after the blue casket carrying the body of the 22-year-old murder victim was carried down the floodlit steps of the Our Lady of Charity Roman Catholic Church in Brookhaven, her teammates from George Mason University - wearing their white jerseys and green pleated shorts - collapsed into huddles of sobs and hugs.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Kelly whacked the pair of lacrosse sticks against the turf. He tried pulling them apart with his gloved hands. Kelly's stick was latched to his opponent's, and his efforts were futile. He dropped the sticks, threw his arms up, and ran off the field. The Malvern Prep junior is one of the nation's premier faceoff specialists, using a technique that snatches the ball with quick precision. Wednesday, his speed was a detriment. He won the faceoff so fast that his opponent's net got tangled on a small crack in the head of Kelly's stick.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Rick Horowitz
There's an old baseball glove - two old baseball gloves, in fact - already on the premises. One of them has frayed laces, cracked leather, stuffing falling out. The other one's worse than that. The other one is flat as a pancake, pale as sand. The other one is named for a guy - you can barely see the name, the palm is worn to nothingness - who used to be an all-star, who's now well past 60. Rule of thumb? You can't play your best with a 60-year-old's name on your hand. Time for a change.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Tamara Audi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was while shopping with her preteen daughters that Linda Wharton, a lawyer and entrepreneur, ran into a most frustrating challenge: She could not find a girls' basketball. "Everywhere we went, we were met with blank stares," said Wharton, explaining that the ball they were looking for is a little smaller in diameter to better fit a girl's hand. "It took some hard work to find one. I thought we can't be the only ones having this problem. There has to be a better way. " There wasn't.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
There was a time when only those high school students who aspired to become professional quarterbacks, point guards or pitchers heard their names chanted by spectators in crowded gymnasium bleachers. But those times have changed. Students who aspire to become scientists, engineers and environmentalists heard the roar of the crowd as they participated in the Physics Olympics of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Physics League at Cinnaminson High School this month. More than 100 high school students from Cinnaminson, Eastern and Pennsylvania's Penncrest, Central, Plymouth-Whitemarsh and Jenkintown participated in events that moved the laws of physics from the classroom to their practical application in the gymnasium.
SPORTS
May 9, 1997 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kelly Feeley constantly played sports while growing up. Street hockey. Kickball. Any sport. Anything that would keep her moving. She's now a junior at Collingswood High, and she's still in motion. Feeley has started in lacrosse since she was a freshman. As a sophomore, she became a starter for the Panthers' field hockey and basketball teams. "It's from one season to the next," Feeley said. "I guess I just enjoy playing sports. It's not a hassle for me - it's fun. I couldn't just sit home and not do anything.
SPORTS
May 28, 2001 | By Bill Iezzi INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lacrosse was unknown to corporate marketing strategist Kevin Milici four years ago when his 10-year-old son said he wanted to play. Today, Milici not only plays and coaches the sport, but is a big reason his son, Brian, and other teenage boys in the Central Bucks School District will have a chance to play lacrosse at the varsity level next year. In January, the Central Bucks school board added boys' lacrosse to the list of varsity sports at Central Bucks East and West High Schools, starting in spring 2002.
SPORTS
May 22, 1998 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She's the little blur who snakes her way through a maze of defenders, often wearing a squint that Clint Eastwood would be proud of. The shots come from awkward angles, and when defenders converge on her, she bounces off them like a pinball. Don't mess with Nikki Leone. Oh, sure, she stands just 5 feet tall, but the muscular former gymnast can squeeze through slivers of daylight to evade defenders or just blow by them. She has one job on the field: to score. Leone, a senior second home, has scored 56 goals for North Penn this season while helping the Maidens sweep through the Suburban One League National Conference with a perfect 14-0 record (14-2 overall)
SPORTS
June 10, 1999 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lacrosse players may graduate from the Barry Ashbee Lacrosse League in eighth grade, but nobody really leaves. The Ashbee League celebrated its 25th anniversary this spring and recognized cofounder Norman Treinish at a special reunion on May 23 at the Merion home of Walter and Nancy Herman. More than 150 Ashbee alumni, players, parents and coaches turned out for the event, which featured commendations from Lower Merion Township and the state House of Representatives. The first Norman and Robyn Treinish Award was presented to Treinish and his wife for their outstanding contributions to the organization.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | By Anika M. Scott, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The nib of a cigar lay forgotten in an ashtray, a half-empty glass of beer snug in the hand of Joe Moore, 68, of Media. He leaned back in his reserved seat at the new Brandywine Turf Club, in front of a computer screen that was tuned in to Monmouth Park's seventh race, just over. "When you win, you're supposed to get your money and walk out," Moore said as he folded his hands like a lecturing scholar. "A compulsive gambler is compelled to make another bet. I could be here until midnight.
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NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Kelly whacked the pair of lacrosse sticks against the turf. He tried pulling them apart with his gloved hands. Kelly's stick was latched to his opponent's, and his efforts were futile. He dropped the sticks, threw his arms up, and ran off the field. The Malvern Prep junior is one of the nation's premier faceoff specialists, using a technique that snatches the ball with quick precision. Wednesday, his speed was a detriment. He won the faceoff so fast that his opponent's net got tangled on a small crack in the head of Kelly's stick.
SPORTS
April 25, 2013 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
Alex and Mackenzie Hlesciak remember the early years, before they were lacrosse players. "Actually," Mackenzie said as a smile crossed her face, "we were supposed to play golf. " "Yup," Alex said. "We actually went to a golf academy for a couple years. " The twins paused for a second, seemingly to envision themselves about to tee off on a par-4. All they could do was burst into laughter. "It's just weird to even think about now," Alex said, still laughing. "Golf definitely was not for us. It's too slow.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Transportation Security Administration touched off a firestorm Tuesday by announcing that passengers can carry small pocket knives, golf clubs, toy baseball bats, and hockey and lacrosse sticks on board airplanes. Since the September 2001 terrorist attacks, the items have been banned in carry-on luggage. TSA Administrator John Pistole, speaking at a conference in Brooklyn, N.Y., announced the policy change to permit knives with retractable blades of less than 2.36 inches (6 centimeters)
SPORTS
May 18, 2010 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO For the Daily News
IT WAS once considered a novelty fringe sport, played by rich kids at elitist prep schools or at public schools in well-to-do socio-economic areas. Until recently, it was perceived as a haven for high school spring athletes who couldn't catch up to a fastball or catch up to anyone running on a track. Drive by a high school field anywhere during the spring, whether you're in Delaware County, the Main Line, Northeast Philadelphia, Bucks or Montgomery counties, and there's a good chance you'll see kids - boys and girls - with lacrosse sticks in their hands, either involved in games, practicing or participating in a clinic or camp.
SPORTS
April 19, 2008 | By John Kopp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chris Wakely has been a member of the lacrosse community since he first began playing at age 12. Now he's witnessing the power of that community. Five years ago, Wakely learned he had multiple sclerosis. He told few people and continued coaching the Lehigh men's team until last June, when Wakely decided he could no longer coach at a desirable level. With the help of his wife, Danielle, Wakely broke the news of his condition to Lehigh's athletic administration, his team and the community, which has rallied in support.
SPORTS
May 28, 2001 | By Bill Iezzi INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lacrosse was unknown to corporate marketing strategist Kevin Milici four years ago when his 10-year-old son said he wanted to play. Today, Milici not only plays and coaches the sport, but is a big reason his son, Brian, and other teenage boys in the Central Bucks School District will have a chance to play lacrosse at the varsity level next year. In January, the Central Bucks school board added boys' lacrosse to the list of varsity sports at Central Bucks East and West High Schools, starting in spring 2002.
SPORTS
June 26, 2000 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The lacrosse sticks are almost as long as some of the girls who are carrying them. Otherwise, the scene during a recent sun-washed afternoon on one of the fields at the United Sports Training Center in Downingtown is pretty much the same as it has been in previous years: Coaches barking instructions; players splitting into groups to test what they have learned. "When I was 7, I was playing basketball," camp director Kathleen Geiger said. "These 7-year-olds are getting a chance to play a sport I didn't play until I was twice that age. " Not that lacrosse is in its infant stage in the area.
SPORTS
June 10, 1999 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lacrosse players may graduate from the Barry Ashbee Lacrosse League in eighth grade, but nobody really leaves. The Ashbee League celebrated its 25th anniversary this spring and recognized cofounder Norman Treinish at a special reunion on May 23 at the Merion home of Walter and Nancy Herman. More than 150 Ashbee alumni, players, parents and coaches turned out for the event, which featured commendations from Lower Merion Township and the state House of Representatives. The first Norman and Robyn Treinish Award was presented to Treinish and his wife for their outstanding contributions to the organization.
SPORTS
May 22, 1998 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She's the little blur who snakes her way through a maze of defenders, often wearing a squint that Clint Eastwood would be proud of. The shots come from awkward angles, and when defenders converge on her, she bounces off them like a pinball. Don't mess with Nikki Leone. Oh, sure, she stands just 5 feet tall, but the muscular former gymnast can squeeze through slivers of daylight to evade defenders or just blow by them. She has one job on the field: to score. Leone, a senior second home, has scored 56 goals for North Penn this season while helping the Maidens sweep through the Suburban One League National Conference with a perfect 14-0 record (14-2 overall)
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