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Lady Bird Johnson

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NEWS
April 29, 1988 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Daily News, the Washington Post and USA Today
Lady Bird Johnson was honored yesterday at separate ceremonies in the House, Senate and the White House, where President Reagan gave her a Congressional Gold Medal for her "humanitarian efforts and outstanding contributions to the improvement and beautification of America. " It was all part of a series of events to honor President Lyndon B. Johnson's widow, who turned 75 in December, and to raise $1 million for her wildflower-research center. The former first lady is involved in a campaign to promote flora as a hedge against further harm to the environment.
NEWS
July 11, 2007 | By Gwen Florio, FOR THE INQUIRER
Lady Bird Johnson, 94, who four decades ago advanced the role of first lady from hostess and helpmate to that of activist, died today at her Austin, Texas, home. Before the environment was even a blip on anyone's political radar, Mrs. Johnson adopted the cause of beautification, planting flowers along Washington's wide avenues and expanding the effort into a national push for natural landscaping that resulted in the Highway Beautification Act of 1965 - which became known as "Lady Bird's Bill.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Gwen Florio FOR THE INQUIRER
Lady Bird Johnson, 94, who four decades ago advanced the role of first lady from hostess and helpmate to that of legislative activist, died yesterday at her Austin, Texas, home. Before the environment was even a blip on anyone's political radar, Mrs. Johnson adopted the cause of beautification, planting flowers along Washington's wide avenues and expanding the effort into a national push for natural landscaping that resulted in the Highway Beautification Act of 1965 - which became known as "Lady Bird's Bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the last week of November 1963 and Lady Bird Johnson, the nation's new first lady, decides to record a diary of her memories of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Johnson is in a second-floor bedroom at the White House. She sits down, composes her thoughts, and then speaks into the microphone of a reel-to-reel tape recorder. That entry from Lady Bird Johnson's diary - the fact that it was audiotape, not pen on paper - is one of the surprises in a new exhibit at the National Constitution Center, "Eyewitness: American Originals From the National Archives.
NEWS
June 23, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush pick for Justice Dept. wants nomination withdrawn President Bush's pick to be the No. 3 official in the Justice Department asked yesterday to have his nomination withdrawn, four days before he was to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Bill Mercer sent a letter to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales saying it was unlikely that the Senate would confirm him as associate attorney general, a post he has held on an interim basis since September. He plans to leave Washington and turn his full attention to his work as U.S. attorney for Montana.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kitty Dukakis, jet-lagged and drowsy at the annual New York Is Book Country Literary Brunch yesterday, said she feared tomorrow's headline would be: "Kitty Dukakis Falls Off Stage. " She didn't. Biographer Robert Caro, mindful of the almost-first lady beside him, avoided the ugly tales that lace his multi-volume biography of Lyndon Johnson, and instead praised Lady Bird Johnson. Then there was Kazuo Ishiguro, one of Britain's hottest young novelists for his tale of a perfectionist butler (The Remains of the Day)
NEWS
December 24, 1990 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
When the first winter snow falls, I often recall fondly my earliest days in Washington, D.C. The blanket of beauty that spreads across a city also provides that needed combination of warmth and moisture that will burst through in spring. The bulbs that bloom throughout the nation's capital - the tulips, daffodils and crocuses are my favorites - are largely thanks to Lady Bird Johnson. Without Lady Bird, most of Washington's public spaces and parks would have remained merely well-kept lawns.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If what you need is a presidential pardon, it helps to have powerful friends, such as a former first lady, a legendary newscaster, and a friend of the president. Texas banker Ruben H. Johnson had all three. The story of how they helped him win a pardon - erasing a felony bank-fraud conviction and relieving him of millions of dollars in legal penalties - is a textbook case of how much weight political connections and generous fund-raising for the Democratic Party carried in Bill Clinton's White House.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Arthur R. McKinstry, 97, who married Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson in 1931, eight years before becoming Episcopal bishop of Delaware, died of cancer Christmas Day at the Methodist Country House in Wilmington. He served as bishop of Delaware from 1939 until 1954, when he resigned because of what turned out to be a temporary bout of ill health. "He was always an optimist; thinking about others, staying ahead of everything," said James T. McKinstry, the bishop's older son. "He remained active until about two weeks before his death.
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NEWS
November 2, 2012 | WASHINGTON POST
  WASHINGTON - Letitia Baldrige, who was social secretary to first lady Jacqueline Kennedy and also became known as a "doyenne of decorum" and chief arbiter of good manners in modern America, died Monday at the Sunrise at Fox Hill nursing facility in Bethesda, Md. She was 86. In a 1978 profile, Time magazine described Baldrige as a "superbly energetic amalgam of feminist and Tasteful Lady. " Decades before women talked about "having it all," and at a time when many of her female colleagues were afforded few professional opportunities, she embarked on a career that went from diplomacy to the White House to the top levels of business.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Irving Broudy, 80, formerly of Narberth, a retired company owner and community leader, died Dec. 5 of pneumonia at Saunders House in Wynnefield. Mr. Broudy grew up in North Philadelphia above his father Arthur's plumbing supply store. He and his brother Jules eventually took over the business, which later became Broudy Precision in Conshohocken, a distributor of heating and air-conditioning parts and products. The family sold the firm in 2006. During his 40 years of civic leadership, Mr. Broudy served as president of the Golden Slipper Club from 1967 to 1969; president of the Jewish Y from 1975 to 1977; chairman of the board of the William Likoff Cardiovascular Institute of Hahnemann Hospital from 1992 to 1993; and past president of the Philadelphia chapter of the American Jewish Committee.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Gwen Florio FOR THE INQUIRER
Lady Bird Johnson, 94, who four decades ago advanced the role of first lady from hostess and helpmate to that of legislative activist, died yesterday at her Austin, Texas, home. Before the environment was even a blip on anyone's political radar, Mrs. Johnson adopted the cause of beautification, planting flowers along Washington's wide avenues and expanding the effort into a national push for natural landscaping that resulted in the Highway Beautification Act of 1965 - which became known as "Lady Bird's Bill.
NEWS
July 11, 2007 | By Gwen Florio, FOR THE INQUIRER
Lady Bird Johnson, 94, who four decades ago advanced the role of first lady from hostess and helpmate to that of activist, died today at her Austin, Texas, home. Before the environment was even a blip on anyone's political radar, Mrs. Johnson adopted the cause of beautification, planting flowers along Washington's wide avenues and expanding the effort into a national push for natural landscaping that resulted in the Highway Beautification Act of 1965 - which became known as "Lady Bird's Bill.
NEWS
June 23, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush pick for Justice Dept. wants nomination withdrawn President Bush's pick to be the No. 3 official in the Justice Department asked yesterday to have his nomination withdrawn, four days before he was to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Bill Mercer sent a letter to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales saying it was unlikely that the Senate would confirm him as associate attorney general, a post he has held on an interim basis since September. He plans to leave Washington and turn his full attention to his work as U.S. attorney for Montana.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the last week of November 1963 and Lady Bird Johnson, the nation's new first lady, decides to record a diary of her memories of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Johnson is in a second-floor bedroom at the White House. She sits down, composes her thoughts, and then speaks into the microphone of a reel-to-reel tape recorder. That entry from Lady Bird Johnson's diary - the fact that it was audiotape, not pen on paper - is one of the surprises in a new exhibit at the National Constitution Center, "Eyewitness: American Originals From the National Archives.
NEWS
March 14, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Heyser, 74, of Worcester, a retired landscape architect who helped beautify many of Center City's plazas and courtyards, died of cancer Tuesday at Keystone House, a hospice in Wyndmoor. Mr. Heyser and his staff were urban gardeners for Philadelphia's downtown landscape for many years, tending the green spaces that complement the city's skyscrapers and office buildings. His Heyser Landscaping Inc. of Norristown maintained and helped create the garden surroundings at major buildings including Commerce Square, the Four Seasons, and Liberty Place, and the sculpture garden at the Wyndham Philadelphia at Franklin Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lyndon Johnson was larger than life. Fittingly, so is his biography. At 3 pounds, 14 ounces, and 1,167 pages (105 pages before Johnson makes an entrance, 90 devoted to sources and footnotes), Robert Caro's gargantuan Years of Lyndon Johnson: Master of the Senate (Alfred A. Knopf, $35) is the third of four planned volumes. It was published last week and welcomed with stunning reviews. Master of the Senate took more years to write - a dozen - than it covers, 1949 to 1960. Caro will be in Philadelphia tomorrow, reading and signing books at Friends Select School.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If what you need is a presidential pardon, it helps to have powerful friends, such as a former first lady, a legendary newscaster, and a friend of the president. Texas banker Ruben H. Johnson had all three. The story of how they helped him win a pardon - erasing a felony bank-fraud conviction and relieving him of millions of dollars in legal penalties - is a textbook case of how much weight political connections and generous fund-raising for the Democratic Party carried in Bill Clinton's White House.
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