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Lady Liberty

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NEWS
July 7, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer Television Critic
Up to and including the Fourth of July, the most memorable televised portion of "Liberty Week" was when the Statue of Liberty, newly unveiled, was bathed in light by spiraling fireworks that danced giddily upward. On Saturday and yesterday, "Liberty Week" logged some more moments in the "plus" column, but not nearly enough to call the much-promoted, week-long televised event an artistic, or even patriotic, success. As TV propaganda, it was about even with the 1980 Republican convention - but with fewer surprises.
NEWS
July 5, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miss Liberty as a kangeroo. Miss Liberty holding a hot dog instead of her torch and a sausage-packed brown paper bag instead of her tablet. Miss Liberty bearing a cross as if she were going up Calvary to the Crucifixion. Miss Liberty playing a guitar. These are some of the offbeat, whimsical, satirical, even outrageous concepts of the Statue of Liberty that Michael Zowniriw has fired into ceramic sculptures over the last 12 years, and he seems never to run out of ideas. Here, in a lighted alcove in his recreation room at his home in Olney, is Liberty Castle, one of his favorites, with a 2-foot-high sculpture of Liberty emerging from the portcullis, her torch held high, sitting cross-legged on a beautiful flying carpet.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Statue of Liberty reopened on the Fourth of July, eight months after Hurricane Sandy shuttered the national symbol of freedom, as Americans around the country celebrated with fireworks and parades and President Obama urged citizens to live up to the words of the Declaration of Independence. Hundreds lined up Thursday to be among the first to board boats destined for Lady Liberty, including New Yorker Heather Leykam and her family. "This, to us, Liberty Island, is really about a rebirth," said Leykam, whose mother's home was destroyed during the storm.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | By Kelly Wolfe INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Perched on an iron patio table on a deck in rural Chester County was not exactly the place one would expect to find the regal figure of Lady Liberty. But there she was. Crown on; arm extended; torch lit. Lloyd Dixon, full-time retiree and part-time artist, constructed the statue from a foam core, canvas, an old piece of downspout, and a bucket. The body was swathed in dyed sheets from a local swap meet. "It took me longer to find the stuff than to build," Dixon said last week, standing next to the statue and smiling broadly.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court today refused to strip the Statue of Liberty of its status as a New Yorker. The court, without comment, turned away an attempt by a New Jersey congressman and mayor to claim jurisdiction over the famous landmark for their state. The ruling came as the court, for the first time since 1971, began a new term without a full complement of nine justices. The prospect of seating a new justice soon remains doubtful, with support eroding in the Democratic-dominated Senate for Judge Robert Bork to replace retired Justice Lewis Powell.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | By Lea Sitton Stanley, Larry Fish and Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Lady Liberty sat on a cooler in Somerton yesterday, languid in the unmoving heat, her steel-gray gown pulled up to her knees, her sneakers showing. She twirled her torch and waited. For Uncle Sam. For Mayor Rendell. But most of all, she waited for Mary Jane Hazell, longtime president of the Somerton Civic Association and queen bee of Somerton's annual Memorial Day Parade. It was Hazell who was to push off the procession in which Rebecca Green, 13, has played the Statue of Liberty for "I guess, like, four years.
NEWS
May 8, 2007 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nature is convex. "Look at yourself," Leo Sewell is saying, standing in the middle of his inimitable studio on Pearl Street in Powelton Village, a place where the things you threw out have found eternal life in little drawers and shelves and, for the lucky parts, sculpture. "You have cavities, you don't have planes. " He's not being fresh. He's explaining why, as he attacks the remnants of a helpless plastic toy Pet Parlor with a screwdriver, he is discarding the straight-edged pieces (the rectilinear)
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
It's an inspiring walk to work as Otis Harmon heads past a 6-foot aluminum/ cast-iron statue of Lady Liberty in - where else? - Northern Liberties. This version makes no reference to the huddled masses.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
RESTING HER HEAD on a model of Lady Liberty, Aubrie Ernst, 5, waits for her mother and sister to finish looking at an exhibit at the Please Touch Museum. The three, from Haddonfield, came over for the All American Days and street fair at the Center City museum for children.
NEWS
March 4, 2002
Last year there were more than 4,000 children under INS custody, many of them having fled such evils as child prostitution, bonded labor, forced recruitment as soldiers, or female genital mutilation. The INS slammed almost half of them behind bars. Imagine the confusion of a child who after perhaps taking courage and comfort from images of Lady Liberty, finds himself locked up with gangbangers and carjackers. No asylum seeker should be subject to this kind of treatment, least of all a child.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - A bill that opponents feared would open the door to the privatization and commercialization of Liberty State Park was signed into law by Gov. Christie on Thursday, but it is expected to be revised soon by new legislation to protect the site. The measure's sponsors, Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto and State Sen. Paul Sarlo, said in a statement that they would write legislation to address concerns about development of the site, a popular gateway to the Statue of Liberty. Christie says the law will help make government smaller and more affordable by merging two agencies - the Meadowlands Commission and the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority - into the new Meadowlands Regional Commission.
NEWS
February 2, 2015
ISSUE | DRONES End deadly strikes The media have done little to inform the public about the targeted killings the Bush and Obama administrations have orchestrated via lethal drones, especially in countries with which we're not at war, so it was commendable to report on the interfaith conference on drone warfare ("A conference considers the morality of drones," Jan. 25). The conference was attended by people of many faiths who called on the White House "to immediately halt targeted, lethal drone strikes," account for victims, disclose standards for compensating victims, and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
OVER 1,000 images were recently digitized into the Philadelphia Library Company's African Americana online collection, serving as a window into black history in Philadelphia and beyond. The African Americana database is the end result of a project that was "20 years in the making," one that will give anyone with an Internet connection access to these cultural relics, said Prints Department Associate Curator Erika Piola. The Philadelphia Library Company has been collecting images since its founding by Benjamin Franklin in 1731, and scholars began collecting photographs, political cartoons and drawings for its African Americana collection in the late 1960s.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Statue of Liberty reopened on the Fourth of July, eight months after Hurricane Sandy shuttered the national symbol of freedom, as Americans around the country celebrated with fireworks and parades and President Obama urged citizens to live up to the words of the Declaration of Independence. Hundreds lined up Thursday to be among the first to board boats destined for Lady Liberty, including New Yorker Heather Leykam and her family. "This, to us, Liberty Island, is really about a rebirth," said Leykam, whose mother's home was destroyed during the storm.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2013
Alsace is France with a German accent. Its unique mix of cultures offers enchanting cobbled villages, scenic vineyards, gourmet cuisine, and art that's still as vibrant as the medieval day it was painted. Standing like a flower-child referee between France and Germany, Alsace has weathered many invasions. Once a German-speaking part of the Holy Roman Empire, it became part of France in the 17th century. After France lost the Franco-Prussian War in 1871, Germany annexed it. It bounced back to France after World War I, but Hitler absorbed it into the Third Reich during World War II. All those centuries as a political shuttlecock have given Alsace a hybrid culture.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By Karen Matthews, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Scores of immigrants waved tiny flags after taking the oath of U.S. citizenship at the foot of the Statue of Liberty on Friday, 125 years after the American symbol and beacon welcoming visitors and immigrants was dedicated. "We are a nation of diverse people," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said during the naturalization ceremony on Liberty Island. "And that diversity strengthens our nation. " The new Americans, 125 immigrants from 46 countries, pledged to renounce foreign power, then posed for photos with their citizenship certificates.
LIVING
July 3, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Fourth of July auctions are not as popular as they once were, but there is at least one tomorrow out in central Pennsylvania that tops its predecessors, thanks to its theme: Patriotism and Americana. The sale by Cindy Fenton will begin at 10 a.m. on Route 11/15, midway between Maryville and Duncannon in Perry County north of Harrisburg. It will offer such items as a Statue of Liberty clock, a tin Uncle Sam on high wire, and a chrome smoking stand of the Statue of Liberty. The roughly 320 lots in the sale come from a former antiques dealer from Chambersburg, Terry Lefler, who began collecting patriotic material in the 1980s, and who was with Fenton earlier this week to set up the sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why is Stephen Colbert coming to Philadelphia? Because he must. "I'm a kingmaker, and this is the battle!" says the host of the satirical, pointedly political chucklefest The Colbert Report, which is pronounced the French way, "coal-BEAR rah-POR. " The show, which airs at 11:30 p.m. on cable's Comedy Central immediately following Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, takes its first-ever road trip this week, taping at the Zellerbach Theatre at the University of Pennsylvania for four days, starting tomorrow.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
Hero's obituary Your front page Tuesday had a photograph of Japanese in Hiroshima lighting candles in memory of the 70,000 killed in 1945 when the atomic bomb was dropped. Bad Americans was the inference. We then had to turn all the way back to Page B7 to read the obituary of Irwin C. Kaye, 91, a former World War II POW and survivor of the Bataan Death March. This American hero's obituary should have been on the front page on the anniversary of Hiroshima. Remember, if there was no Pearl Harbor, there would have been no Hiroshima.
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