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Lafayette Hill

ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
FOX 29 will welcome a new face to its evening anchor desk on June 30. Lucy Noland , who was recently at KNBC, in Los Angeles, will join the 5, 6 and 10 p.m. newscasts alongside Iain Page . Readers of the column will remember I told you that former evening anchor Kerry Barrett , who is on maternity leave with her second child , John Barrett IV , is moving to anchor the morning newscast with Chris Murphy from 4 to 7 a.m., and...
SPORTS
September 29, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Half-century-old relics from the 1964 Phillies are scattered all over this region like pieces of a shattered heart. The baseballs Jim Bunning autographed, the Dick Allen rookie cards, the team photos, the yellowed newspaper clippings, the Phillies merchandise that sold as briskly here that memorable summer as Beatles records. Strips of unused World Series tickets, as if awaiting some magical reversal of fate, are kept in scrapbooks, displayed in frames, stored in safe-deposit boxes.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | For The Inquirer / DAN OLESKI
In a swoop for the hoop, this threesome enjoys a game of basketball at Miles Park in Plymouth. They are (from left) Jordan Knight, Brian Carpenter, and Jordan Friter, all of Lafayette Hill.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Walter E. Gilinger, 98, of Lafayette Hill, a retired automotive shop owner and bus-service owner, died Saturday at Gwynedd Square Nursing Center in Upper Gwynedd. Mr. Gilinger was born in Whitemarsh Township, graduated from the Barren Hill School and studied engineering at night at Drexel Institute of Technology, now Drexel University. He was a lifelong resident of Lafayette Hill. After 55 years of operation, he retired in 1975 as owner of Gilinger's Garage in Lafayette Hill.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shoppers across the Philadelphia region packed malls and big-box stores on Black Friday, battling for parking spots and discount goods. But in a second-floor space on the south side of Rittenhouse Square, commerce took on a quieter tone. The Tibetan Bazaar is the un-Black Friday, a place to shop for unique silverwork and textiles, to savor salty butter tea and inhale the steamy scent of traditional dumplings, known as momos, to trade the blare of canned holiday music for the hum of chanting monks.
NEWS
May 20, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James H. Shacklett Jr., 66, internationally known in the label business and a devoted supporter of the Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, died Sunday at his Lafayette Hill home after a long illness. At the time of his death, Mr. Shacklett was chairman of National Label Co., a family-owned business with which he had been affiliated for more than 40 years. He previously was president and chief executive officer of the firm, which was founded by his father in 1918 in North Philadelphia and moved to Lafayette Hill in 1968.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Neve, 92, of Lafayette Hill, a Conshohocken businessman, died of heart failure Monday, Jan. 14, at his home. In 1936, Mr. Neve started J.J. Neve Coal & Fuel Co. He served as its owner-operator before retiring in 1980. Under Mr. Neve, the business expanded to encompass an iron and steel trucking warehouse and storage facility, and an iron ore unloading facility. The consolidated firm, James J. Neve Inc., is now run by Mr. Neve's son Joseph A. It is a warehousing, unloading, and distribution center for railway cargo.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
FOUR YEARS ago, when she launched the first Sour Fest, at South Philly's Devil's Den, owner Erin Wallace was happy to offer a modest list of about a dozen sour ales, including the highly regarded likes of Petrus Aged Pale Ale , Cantillon Kriek and Russian River Consecration . At the time, the existence of these quirky, tart varieties seemed nothing more than a blip in the growth of artisan brews. Most craft brewers were focused elsewhere - on hops or high alcohol. Sour beer, by contrast, didn't seem to have much of a future - not just because of its off-putting name and unconventional flavor, but because of its somewhat complex and time-consuming brewing methods.
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