CollectionsLafayette Hill
IN THE NEWS

Lafayette Hill

NEWS
March 7, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles A. Kessler Jr., 72, of Lafayette Hill, a former general contractor and retired insurance adjustor, died last Friday at the Clara Burke Community in Whitemarsh. After receiving his degree from the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College in 1948, he joined the family's general-contracting business, Charles A. Kessler Inc., which later became Keefer Kessler Associates. Many years later, he liquidated the company and joined Young Adjustment Co., where he was an adjuster until retiring in 1995.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
H. William Keil, 64, of Lafayette Hill, retired chairman of a Delaware engineering firm, died Sunday at Chestnut Hill Hospital, where he had been taken after going into cardiac arrest. A mechanical engineer, he had been affiliated with Furlow Associates of Claymont for 30 years. He retired in January 1996 after serving as president and chairman. Mr. Keil was born in Bristol Township and was raised in Philadelphia, graduating from Roxborough High School in 1949. He attended Muhlenberg College in Allentown and earned his engineering degree in 1953 from Drexel University.
NEWS
February 22, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mina M. D'Lauro Tosta, 84, of Lafayette Hill, former co-owner of a Philadelphia restaurant, died Tuesday at Montgomery Hospital in Norristown. In the 1930s and '40s, she and her husband owned and operated the Rock Inn in Chestnut Hill. Mrs. Tosta was born in Philadelphia and graduated from Mount St. Joseph Academy, then attended Chestnut Hill College. She resided for more than half a century in Lafayette Hill, where she was a member of St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Church and of its Philippians social group, women's guild, and home and school association.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joseph A. Goldbeck Sr., 73, of Lafayette Hill in Montgomery County, a retired mortgage banking executive, died Tuesday at the Integrated Health Services facility in Springfield Township, Montgomery County, of complications from Alzheimer's disease. In 1980, Mr. Goldbeck retired as president and vice chairman after 35 years with Central Mortgage Co. in Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated in 1942 from Roxborough High School and served in the Army during World War II. Mr. Goldbeck was a Lafayette Hill resident for the last 23 years and formerly lived in Blue Bell for eight years, and in Philadelphia's Andorra section for 17 years.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Danielle Snyderman's fascination with the love lives of her elderly patients began after a woman in her late 80s suffered a series of falls. It was clear that she could no longer live safely in an apartment with her husband of six decades. A broken hip would have been catastrophic for her. Snyderman, a geriatrician, recommended that the woman move to assisted living. Her husband resisted fiercely, fighting against what seemed to be in his wife's best interest. "Every morning, we wake up," he told Snyderman, "and we look at each other and we stick out our tongues.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Patricia Stewart Walsh's life appeared to be on the same track as other Chestnut Hill debutantes': private schools, good marriage, charity events, and lots of tennis. But then she met Richard Walsh, a future spy, and her life took a turn for the adventurous. Mrs. Walsh, 88, of Lafayette Hill, died Thursday, April 7, at her home, four years after suffering a stroke. She spent most of her married life in Europe, where her husband worked for the CIA. A graduate of Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, she was dating Walsh's younger brother when she caught the eye of her future husband.
NEWS
March 14, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Victor Dunoff, 66, of Lafayette Hill, owner of a Montgomery County company who was active in charity work, died Tuesday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Mr. Dunoff was a manufacturer's representative and the owner-president of Safety Hoist Co. in Wyndmoor. He was an active volunteer for the Breast Health Institute of Philadelphia and had helped found Step Above, an organization for single Jewish people 35 or older. "He was a terrific source of enthusiasm and energy," said Elaine Grobman, executive director of the Breast Health Institute.
NEWS
March 12, 2016
ISSUE | MEDIA Cartoon in bad taste It was disgusting to see Signe Wilkinson's editorial cartoon depicting Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, and Marco Rubio in a whose-is-bigger moment (Wednesday). It seems the Republican front-runner's gutter mentality is influencing the thinking of an esteemed newspaper like the Inquirer. During last week's debate, the candidates were talking about hand size when Trump referred to his sexual prowess. But you folks have gone one step worse by illustrating it. I would have a difficult time explaining it to my child.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William C. Parker, 83, a former prisoner of war and retired retailing manager, died Saturday of cancer at his home in Lafayette Hill. Mr. Parker was serving as a second lieutenant and bombardier in the Army Air Corps when his B-24 Liberator was shot down during World War II. "He spent a year and 27 days as a prisoner of war at a camp in Sagan, Germany," said his wife, Mary Murray Parker, to whom he would have been married for 50 years in...
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Wallach, 95, a Lafayette Hill grocer for more than six decades, died Tuesday at the Leader One Nursing Home in East Norriton, where he had lived for five weeks. Mr. Wallach came to Lafayette Hill in the 1920s as one of its early settlers, at a time when the community was known as Barren Hill. There, he opened Wallach's Food Market at Chestnut Street and Germantown Pike, and over the years became regarded as a community fixture. The sort of old-fashioned grocer who was willing to take orders over the telephone and deliver to people's homes, Mr. Wallach became known both for his business and for his civic interests.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|