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NEWS
May 31, 2012
4 sticks (1 pound) unsalted butter 1 large white onion, sliced thin 5 garlic cloves, chopped 1 jalapeño, including seeds, chopped 3 bottles Yuengling lager 6 cups canned whole tomatoes in their juice 1 cup diced fresh tomatoes 1/2 cup diced onion Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste     1. In a large Dutch oven over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion, garlic, and jalapeño, and cook, stirring often, until the vegetables become tender, about 3 to 5 minutes.
FOOD
June 8, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
Britain, once a stronghold of ale drinkers in a world that had long since gone lager, is slowly but steadily abandoning its traditional brew. Flat, dark and warmish ale has been the staple of pubs, the centerpiece of contemplative drinking, a subject of fiery British debate and an object of foreigners' bewilderment. But British beer-drinking fashions are changing, with more and more Britons thirsting for the lighter, gassy beer with 19th-century origins on the European continent.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | By Sam Gugino, Daily News Restaurant Critic
My friend Ron begged me not to tell you about McNally's Tavern because, as he put it, "Then everyone would know about it and that would spoil things. " I thanked Ron for the implicit compliment, but reminded him that people outside of Chestnut Hill have a right to know about McNally's, too. On the surface, neighborhood taverns and Chestnut Hill would seem as odd a combo as espadrilles and Fishtown. But Chestnut Hill has two good ones, Campbell's and McNally's. Today we'll sample McNally's.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
In Philadelphia, there are scores of historical markers commemorating churches and politicians and inventors and factories. But none for beer. As the voice of the beer-drinking public, I'd file an immediate complaint with the proper authorities if I weren't too lazy to slide off this barstool. So Joe Sixpack will simply lift a pint to toast Rich Wagner, the city's leading beer historian, who has made it his mission to promote Philadelphia's important role in the foundation of brewing in America.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is a mystery of history and beer. Beer, as we know it today, was introduced to America by a former Bavarian brewmaster named John Wagner in Philadelphia in 1840. But no one knows how Wagner solved the yeast problem that had prevented American brewmasters from making lager beer. No one else had. Wagner, George Esslinger, Fred Poth, Christian Schmidt and other local brewmasters of the past will be recalled today as the German Society opens its newest exhibit, "Brewed in Philadelphia - A 19th Century View.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008
A COUPLE of years ago at the World Beer Cup in Seattle, a contingent of judges from Germany found themselves scratching their heads at the evaluation guidelines for their country's most revered quaff, Oktoberfestbier. The biennial international competition, organized by the Brewers Association, lays out exacting criteria for 75 styles of ales and lagers, dictating everything from color and aroma to body and alcohol content. Even the most freewheeling brewers consult the standards as they design their recipes.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
News item: The Brewers Association has updated its Beer Style Guidelines, with definitions of 142 separate styles. The newest additions are Adambier and Grätzer. SO, THE authoritative organization of small American brewers has reached back a few centuries and turned up a pair of thoroughly obscure smoked European wheat beers for its comprehensive directory. They join a list of everything from Leipzig-style Gose to good ol' American malt liquor. I'm a big fan of style guidelines (heck, I wrote an entire book about 'em)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2008
IT'S JUST a coincidence, but there was a striking convergence of ale developments in the city this week. The new Budweiser American Ale hit the streets, and Yards - the city's British-style ale maker - finally began brewing at its new facility in Northern Liberties. Ale, for those who need the remedial, is one of the two main types of beer, distinguished from more commonplace lager by its yeast strain and temperature of fermentation. Ale is fermented at warm temps, which produces a fruitier, fuller flavor than that of the typical crisp, cold-brewed lager.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Elizabeth Baltz Brooke, 77, a fashion model in the 1930s and great- grandaughter of the founder of a Philadelphia brewery, died last Sunday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. She was a Main Line resident for more than 50 years. Mrs. Brooke modeled designer clothes in New York City during the 1930s after graduating from the Agnes Irwin School in Rosemont. She was a descendant of Jacob Baltz, who established J & P Baltz Brewing Co. in 1850. The brewery remained a premier producer of lager beer in Brewerytown in Philadelphia until the time of Prohibition in the 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
YOU THINK WE have a pretty good beer scene now? You should've seen this town back in 1879. Every neighborhood had its own brewery, and every corner had a saloon. In the preceding 30 years, more than 250 breweries had opened — many of them closing quickly, but others becoming national powers. A census by Western Brewer magazine counted an astonishing 94 breweries up and running. The city's population was barely half of today's, and yet it had 12 times the number of breweries we boast of in 2012.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2016
Buzz: Hey, Marnie, I've had it. Every bar in town sells this complex yuck like pumpkin-jalapeño imperial IPA, but no one sells the old-school lagers I love: Piels, Ballantine, Schmidt's! I can't even get Bud or Beck's at a lot of places these days. Marnie: I know exactly what you mean, Buzz. I love that the beer world has exploded into a rainbow of colors and flavors. But I do wish that traditional crisp, refreshing lagers and traditional beer drinkers like you were getting more respect.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Food Critic
How "local" is your beer? It used to be that proximity of the brewery and clever references on the label would suffice. But the local quotient has ratcheted higher, lately, as prime ingredients themselves have become sourced regionally, too, in particular grains grown and malted locally by a pair of relatively new malthouses, Deer Creek in Glen Mills and Double Eagle in Huntingdon Valley. The cost is higher than malts imported, say, from Germany. But brewmaster John Wible at 2nd Story Brewing in Old City shows just how rewardingly vivid those fresh local grains can be in his toasty new Pennsylvania Lager, a deep-amber Vienna-style brew made with 95 percent barley and 5 percent rye from Deer Creek.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
News item: The Brewers Association has updated its Beer Style Guidelines, with definitions of 142 separate styles. The newest additions are Adambier and Grätzer. SO, THE authoritative organization of small American brewers has reached back a few centuries and turned up a pair of thoroughly obscure smoked European wheat beers for its comprehensive directory. They join a list of everything from Leipzig-style Gose to good ol' American malt liquor. I'm a big fan of style guidelines (heck, I wrote an entire book about 'em)
NEWS
January 4, 2013
WHEN HISTORIANS - or maybe just the hungover - look back on 2012, they'll remember it for the biggest expansion in Philadelphia-area brewing since at least the 1800s. About 10 new area breweries opened during the year, and a half-dozen breweries either launched or completed major expansions. We saw new brewpubs (Tired Hands, Forest & Main, Iron Hill, Vault and McKenzie), new production breweries (Round Guys, Free Will, Neshaminy Creek, Susquehanna), and bigger facilities from thriving operations (Flying Fish, Sly Fox, Troegs, Weyerbacher and, now under way, Victory and Yards)
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | Freelance
Grover Cleveland Bergdoll had a reputation as a playboy in early 20th-century Philadelphia. His family made its fortune in the brewing business. His grandfather, Louis Bergdoll, brought his knowledge of lager beer-making from Germany, and established a brewery in Philadelphia in the mid-1800s. The Bergdoll & Sons Brewing Co. achieved national success and became a household name. Bergdoll and his siblings lived privileged lives in Philadelphia. He raced cars, flew planes, and made national headlines when he dodged the draft during World War I. Bergdoll successfully evaded the draft in the United States, eventually fleeing to Germany.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
4 sticks (1 pound) unsalted butter 1 large white onion, sliced thin 5 garlic cloves, chopped 1 jalapeño, including seeds, chopped 3 bottles Yuengling lager 6 cups canned whole tomatoes in their juice 1 cup diced fresh tomatoes 1/2 cup diced onion Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste     1. In a large Dutch oven over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion, garlic, and jalapeño, and cook, stirring often, until the vegetables become tender, about 3 to 5 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
YOU THINK WE have a pretty good beer scene now? You should've seen this town back in 1879. Every neighborhood had its own brewery, and every corner had a saloon. In the preceding 30 years, more than 250 breweries had opened — many of them closing quickly, but others becoming national powers. A census by Western Brewer magazine counted an astonishing 94 breweries up and running. The city's population was barely half of today's, and yet it had 12 times the number of breweries we boast of in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011
SURE, THAT CUP of bathtub gin might be laced with deadly wood alcohol. But bouts of blindness, leg amputation and sudden death notwithstanding, boozing during the Prohibition - at least as depicted in the new Ken Burns three-part docu-film airing on PBS next week - sure looks fun. The dandies in tuxedos, the girls in flapper dresses dancing to the raucous music of jazz bands as gallons of lager sprays from speakeasy faucets - wow, the...
FOOD
June 2, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Philly may be dubbed "The Best Beer-Drinking City in America," but our love of the fizzy stuff has also bubbled over into the way we eat. Walk into any gastropub and witness the inventiveness with which local chefs are incorporating beer into their cooking. "Beer appreciation was always a hobby for me, but working at the Taproom, I've learned much more about using it in cooking, having access to all these great products here," says Jesse Kimball, chef of Memphis Taproom in Port Richmond.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008
A COUPLE of years ago at the World Beer Cup in Seattle, a contingent of judges from Germany found themselves scratching their heads at the evaluation guidelines for their country's most revered quaff, Oktoberfestbier. The biennial international competition, organized by the Brewers Association, lays out exacting criteria for 75 styles of ales and lagers, dictating everything from color and aroma to body and alcohol content. Even the most freewheeling brewers consult the standards as they design their recipes.
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