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Laila Ali

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October 10, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Acri, who promoted Laila Ali's highly publicized boxing debut Friday night at the Turning Stone Casino Resort, said he was embarrassed when the bout was over. Not for Ali, the 21-year-old who scored a first-round knockout while her famous father, Muhammad Ali, watched at ringside, but for the opponent, April Fowler. The scheduled four-round bout that attracted reporters from around the world lasted only 31 seconds. Fowler, a nervous, overmatched waitress from Michigan City, Ind., never got off a punch.
SPORTS
October 20, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Ready for Ali-Frazier IV? Heavyweight champions Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier tested the limits of human endurance in three classic matchups in the 1970s, Ali winning twice. Now, like "Star Trek," it seems the series could be extended to the next generation. "If Laila Ali wants a piece of me, I'll kick her butt," said Jacquelyn Frazier-Lyde, one of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier's 11 children. "Just let me know when, where and for how much money. I'll be there. " Frazier-Lyde, responding to a question from the Daily News, issued the challenge to the 21-year-old daughter of Muhammad Ali after Laila Ali's professional boxing debut on Oct. 8. Laila, fighting as a super middleweight, knocked out overmatched April Fowler, who was counted out only 31 seconds into the first round of a scheduled four-round women's bout in Verona, N.Y. Frazier-Lyde's combative take on Laila Ali's decision to take up her daddy's business is just another log tossed onto the fire that continually heats boxing's answer to the Hatfields vs. the McCoys.
SPORTS
May 20, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jacqui Frazier-Lyde, daughter of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, stopped overmatched Norma Galloway at 1:04 of the fourth round last night. Frazier-Lyde improved to 4-0 with the longest fight of her pro career. She knocked out two of her previous opponents in the first round, and stopped the other in the third round. The 38-year-old fighter, based in Philadelphia and trained by brother Marvis, stunned Galloway with a right-left combination that prompted referee Steve Smoger to stop the bout.
SPORTS
April 27, 2001 | by Bernard Fernandez Daily News Sports Writer
The only thing that was missing was a startled Howard Cosell having his toupee knocked askew. It remains to be seen whether the June8 pairing of celebrity daughters Jacqui Frazier-Lyde and Laila Ali, the first pay-per-view boxing card featuring women in the main event, can even remotely approach the classic action of the trilogy involving their heavyweight-champion fathers, Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali in the 1970s. But if yesterday's news conference at the African-American Museum of Philadelphia is any indication, "Sister Smoke" and "Madame Butterfly" already have mastered the finer points of trash-talking.
SPORTS
October 9, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
No, Laila Ali was saying, her posturing over the fallen April Fowler, very reminiscent of the way her father, Muhammad Ali, had defiantly stood over Sonny Liston in their May 25, 1961, rematch in Lewiston, Maine, was not orchestrated or rehearsed. "It came naturally," insisted the youngest daughter of the legendary, three-time former heavyweight champion, whose professional debut here last night at the Turning Stone Resort Casino was more notable for her family background than for whatever skills she demonstrated in the ridiculously easy one-round knockout.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of distinguished athletes and the wife of Muhammad Ali tackled questions about athletes being role models and social activists during a forum this afternoon at the National Constitution Center. The panel - made up of Lonnie Ali, the boxing great's wife; his daughter Laila Ali, herself a former professional boxer; retired basketball star Dikembe Mutombo; and recent Olympic champions, boxer Claressa Shields, and rower Susan Francia - addressed a wide range of questions raised by moderator, acclaimed bioethicist Arthur Caplan.
SPORTS
September 9, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Muhammad Ali's youngest daughter, who earlier this year told her famous father that she wanted to follow in his footsteps, is finally ready to step into the ring. Laila Ali will make her professional debut Oct. 8 at Turning Stone Casino in Verona, N.Y., on a card featuring Donovan "Razor" Ruddock. The opponent in the four-round bout for the 5-10, 160-pound Laila Ali has not been announced. Laila Ali, 21, who operates a nail salon and also models, has the best of instructors.
SPORTS
April 8, 2000 | by Mike Waters, For the Daily News
Another outclassed opponent went up in smoke at the hands of Sister Smoke. Jacqui Frazier-Lyde, the 38-year-old daughter of Smokin' Joe, put an end to Wanda Gamble's folly just 59 seconds into their fight in front of 1,200 curiosity seekers at the Turning Stone Casino and Resort. Gamble, a ring rookie out of Akron, Ohio, walked straight into Frazier-Lyde's left hand mere seconds into the fight. She hit the canvas less than five seconds after the opening bell. After fumbling awkwardly against Frazier-Lyde's power punching, Gamble absorbed a body-shot, stood there for a few moments and took a knee in the center of the ring for an unceremonious conclusion to the fight.
SPORTS
January 5, 2000 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
Leave it to boxing to come up with "The Dueling Daughters. " Though nothing is official, promoter Don Elbaum said Jacqui Frazier-Lyde, the daughter of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, could square off before the end of the year against Laila Ali, the daughter of you-know-who. In that this fall is the 25th anniversary of the "Thrilla in Manila," a classic prizefight in the annals of the sports, Frazier-Lyde would love to commemorate that historic event by stepping into the ring against Laila.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of distinguished athletes and the wife of Muhammad Ali tackled questions about athletes being role models and social activists during a forum this afternoon at the National Constitution Center. The panel - made up of Lonnie Ali, the boxing great's wife; his daughter Laila Ali, herself a former professional boxer; retired basketball star Dikembe Mutombo; and recent Olympic champions, boxer Claressa Shields, and rower Susan Francia - addressed a wide range of questions raised by moderator, acclaimed bioethicist Arthur Caplan.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer
IN THE HANDS that have helped and hurt so many, Muhammad Ali clasped the Liberty Medal Thursday night, staring at the award as his wife delivered remarks on his behalf. The heavyweight boxing legend and Olympic champion looked up only when songstress Roberta Flack performed a moving rendition of "The Impossible Dream," a fitting tribute to a man who once said: "Impossible is not a fact. It is an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It is a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary.
SPORTS
December 15, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Philadelphia's Jacqui Frazier-Lyde won the vacant Women's International Boxing Organization super-middleweight title last night by technical knockout when Suzy Taylor of Las Vegas couldn't answer the fifth-round bell at the Convention Center. Frazier-Lyde, daughter of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, led on all scorecards going into the fourth round of the scheduled 10-round bout, which drew a crowd of about 2,000. Taylor (10-6-1), facing a barrage of left hooks from Frazier-Lyde (8-1)
SPORTS
December 14, 2001 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Jacqui Frazier-Lyde will box before a hometown crowd for the first time tonight when she takes on Suzy Taylor of Las Vegas for the vacant Women's International Boxing Organization super-middleweight title at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. "I am honored, humbled and privileged to fight for the championship in my hometown of Philadelphia," said Frazier-Lyde, the daughter of former heavyweight champion Smokin' Joe Frazier. "This a is boxing town with history and culture.
SPORTS
December 6, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't exactly the attire favored by most boxers - high heels, sweatpants, plain black top - but then again, Jacqui Frazier-Lyde isn't most boxers. At first glance, there is little indication that she is, indeed, a boxer. After all, aren't boxers supposed to look battered and bruised? But on Frazier-Lyde's face there wasn't even a mark, not one cut, not one scar, not one scratch. Frazier-Lyde is training for a Dec. 14 bout against Suzy Taylor of Las Vegas for the Women's International Boxing Organization's middleweight championship, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
SPORTS
June 8, 2001 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was two days before the big fight, and Jacqui Frazier-Lyde was getting restless. "It's going too slow," she said. "It's taking too long to get here. " Frazier-Lyde (7-0 7 KO's), the daughter of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, was anticipating her long-awaited boxing match against Laila Ali (9-0, 8 KO's), whose father is none other than Muhammad Ali. Tonight, the two relative novices will do battle in an eight-round bout that will headline a seven-fight event at the Turning Stone Casino in Verona, N.Y. Another Philadelphian, former heavyweight champion Tim Witherspoon (51-10-1, 35 KO's)
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the It's-a-Drag-Being-Famous Department: Sensitive Hunk Ben Affleck is upset because his celebrity gets in the way of living a normal life, darn it. He said this, interestingly enough, as he was being interviewed on national television (ABC's Good Morning America) to promote his new mega-blockbuster film (Pearl Harbor, opening tomorrow). One gives up a great deal being Ben, apparently. "There are a lot of sacrifices," Affleck observed. For example, he said, when you're famous, everyone knows too much about your love life.
SPORTS
April 27, 2001 | by Bernard Fernandez Daily News Sports Writer
The only thing that was missing was a startled Howard Cosell having his toupee knocked askew. It remains to be seen whether the June8 pairing of celebrity daughters Jacqui Frazier-Lyde and Laila Ali, the first pay-per-view boxing card featuring women in the main event, can even remotely approach the classic action of the trilogy involving their heavyweight-champion fathers, Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali in the 1970s. But if yesterday's news conference at the African-American Museum of Philadelphia is any indication, "Sister Smoke" and "Madame Butterfly" already have mastered the finer points of trash-talking.
SPORTS
April 27, 2001 | By Ashley McGeachy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It started instantly. The stylish young woman, her makeup perfect and her nails sporting a French manicure, sat quietly, gritting her teeth and occasionally rolling her eyes. Finally, as her loquacious counterpart, dressed in a short, shiny black skirt and black tank top, waved and said loudly, "Hey everybody," Laila Ali had had enough. She flashed her index finger at a slew of cameras, to signal she was No. 1, and grinned. Quickly, the spotlight shifted back. "I just want you all to know I'm in shape," Jacqui Frazier-Lyde, also known as Sister Smoke, told the crowd at the African American Museum in Philadelphia at Seventh and Arch Streets.
SPORTS
February 8, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Laila Ali will fight Jacqui Frazier in June - perhaps even on Father's Day - promoters said yesterday at Turning Stone Casino in Verona, N.Y., where Laila made her professional debut 16 months ago. "Because of the legacy of our fathers, a lot of people want to see the fight and are very interested in it. That's all people ask me about," said Laila, 23, virtually ignoring Jacqui, 39, throughout an hourlong press conference. "If that's what people want to see, then that's what you've got to give them.
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