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NEWS
June 19, 2002
In Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua's report to his parishioners (Inquirer, June 17), I found several interesting omissions: First, though the cardinal voices his love for his priests, there seems to be less concern about love and compassion for young parishioners who suffer sexual abuse by priests. If priests lose their ministry for one offense, what do trusting young men and women suffer throughout the rest of their lives after being sexually violated by men of the cloth whom they were taught to trust and revere?
NEWS
October 27, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
As the Roman Catholic hierarchy tries to steer itself out of the sex-abuse scandal, church reformers have lined the wayside with neon slogans: More Accountability. More Openness. Stronger Lay Input. The U.S. bishops heard those calls at their June meeting in Dallas, where speakers implored them to establish "a new regime of collaboration with laity. " And in Philadelphia, never a hotbed of church dissent, an invigorated coalition of Catholic reform groups held a forum this month to press its case for a "renewed church.
LIVING
June 25, 2000 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Each week, Bob Wilson sits down at his home computer to plan the activities for the prayer and care ministry at Calvary Fellowship Church, an independent, nondenominational church in Lionville that attracts more than 1,600 people to its services each Sunday. Wilson is the leader of a team of more than 30 parishioners at the Chester County church responsible for visiting area hospitals and nursing homes, fulfilling requests for prayer, seeing that a timely meal is delivered, or even presiding at a funeral or memorial service.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Roman Catholic bishops from around the world will discuss giving the laity - particularly women - a greater role in church affairs during a month-long meeting starting today at the Vatican. Pope John Paul II called the meeting of the Synod of Bishops - a consultative body that advises the Pope on various issues - to examine the role of the laity in the church and society. A particularly intense subject is expected to be the role of women in the church, a topic repeatedly raised during the Pope's visit to the United States last month.
NEWS
March 2, 2011
With respect to John P. McNamee's "A docile tradition protects the church" (Feb. 22), I agree to the extent that the sound of the response of Catholics to this tragedy implied by that word docile is silent. Prayer is silent. Rumination is silent. The terrible feeling experienced by Catholics, by anyone who is spiritual, is silent. The sound of the shepherds of the Catholic Church worldwide who do not come forward, do not experience shame, do not repent, do not seek forgiveness, do not seek to change, is also silent.
NEWS
November 16, 2002
Two out of three feels bad. On Wednesday, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops approved changes to its policy on priests and sexual abuse. They emerged from a hurried negotiation between the bishops and a disapproving Vatican. At least two things about the plan are good. But there's that third thing, and it overshadows the other two. The first good thing: The bishops are serious about zero tolerance. They've heard the voice of the laity. If a priest is found guilty of sexual abuse by either civil courts or church tribunals, that priest will never again be allowed to serve in a public ministry.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Bishop Joseph A. Galante braced for the grief he knew would follow the news that nearly half the parishes in the Camden Diocese would close, he thought often of his brother Bill. "He and his wife spend time in Naples, Fla.," the bishop said on Friday, a day after he detailed a massive restructuring of the Roman Catholic diocese's 124 parishes. "And all he talks about is how vibrant the local parish is: the people going to Mass, the wonderful preaching, concerts with sacred music and popular music.
NEWS
January 7, 2006 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's time for Catholics of the Camden Diocese to own their rightful place in the church, according to Bishop Joseph Galante, who will unveil a "vision for the future" of his diocese at Masses this weekend. "I believe passionately in the idea of the 'Church as the People of God' at the heart of the Second Vatican Council," Galante said in an interview yesterday. "The idea is that there is a fundamental equality among all the baptized. " Galante said he hoped to see laity take a more active role in the affairs of their parishes, freeing priests to devote more time to their sacramental duties.
LIVING
July 22, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three women in capri pants lounge on wicker chairs in an enclosed porch within sight of the sea. One has pierced ears, another has dyed hair, the third is wearing a T-shirt with a Winston cigarette logo. They don't look like nuns. But the dress code changed significantly after Vatican II. And besides, these sisters are on retreat here at St. Mary-by-the-Sea in Cape May Point. Dress is not the only thing different at houses such as St. Mary. Retreat, the centuries-old practice of traveling to a secluded spot for an intense period of silent renewal and reflection, is no longer the province solely of avowed Catholic sisters.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | By Kenneth A. Briggs
As Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, the future Pope John Paul II promoted solidarity in the Polish Catholic church's fight against communism. Taking a lesson from the church, the political movement that freed Poland named itself Solidarity. A similar strategy is evident as the Pope attempts to discipline an unruly church. And this effort seems misguided. For most of his long papacy, Pope John Paul has attempted to stifle dissent in the name of a unified mission to preach the truth to a world engulfed by rival ideologies.
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NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Don Babwin, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The Rev. Andrew Greeley, 85, an outspoken Roman Catholic priest, best-selling author, and longtime newspaper columnist who criticized the hierarchy of his church over the child sex-abuse scandal, died Wednesday at his Chicago home, according to his publicist, June Rosner. In a statement released Thursday through Rosner, Father Greeley's niece, Elizabeth Durkin, praised her uncle as a loving individual who "tremendously enriched" people's lives. "He served the church . . . with a prophetic voice and with unfailing dedication," she said.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | Ed Weiner
I know that I am not the only person who is angered at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's type of sentencing of Reverends Mazzotta and Campbell, because I am sure that they did not have only one encounter of child molestation — it was only one "reported" encounter for each priest, who should be excommunicated from the Church. To my knowledge, no priest/molester has been excommunicated from the Church, as the Church has taken steps to excommunicate abortionists, murderers or anyone else who intentionally deviates from Church teachings.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
Punished for following the rules It makes me sad to hear that my elementary school, St. John Chrysostom in Wallingford, is closing ("Final bells for 49," Saturday). I can't even begin to think about how upset I'd be if I were still enrolled, if I were a parent, or if I worked there. The part that saddens me the most, though, is how it's ending. I never imagined that it would close based on an announcement from a commission of 16 nuns, priests, and men in suits. Very few, if any, of the commission members have ever even been to St. John's for one day, let alone the 12 years my family spent there.
NEWS
March 2, 2011
With respect to John P. McNamee's "A docile tradition protects the church" (Feb. 22), I agree to the extent that the sound of the response of Catholics to this tragedy implied by that word docile is silent. Prayer is silent. Rumination is silent. The terrible feeling experienced by Catholics, by anyone who is spiritual, is silent. The sound of the shepherds of the Catholic Church worldwide who do not come forward, do not experience shame, do not repent, do not seek forgiveness, do not seek to change, is also silent.
NEWS
September 1, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying the strains of leadership had proved too much for him, Bishop Joseph Martino announced yesterday he was stepping down as head of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Scranton after six contentious years. Early resignations are unusual in the Catholic hierarchy, but Martino, 63, said he was suffering frequent insomnia and sometimes "crippling" fatigue, and felt he could no longer lead effectively. The normal retirement age for Catholic bishops is 75. Cardinal Justin Rigali, the Roman Catholic archbishop of Philadelphia, will serve as interim leader of the 350,000-member diocese, which comprises 11 northeastern counties.
LIVING
July 22, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three women in capri pants lounge on wicker chairs in an enclosed porch within sight of the sea. One has pierced ears, another has dyed hair, the third is wearing a T-shirt with a Winston cigarette logo. They don't look like nuns. But the dress code changed significantly after Vatican II. And besides, these sisters are on retreat here at St. Mary-by-the-Sea in Cape May Point. Dress is not the only thing different at houses such as St. Mary. Retreat, the centuries-old practice of traveling to a secluded spot for an intense period of silent renewal and reflection, is no longer the province solely of avowed Catholic sisters.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Bishop Joseph A. Galante braced for the grief he knew would follow the news that nearly half the parishes in the Camden Diocese would close, he thought often of his brother Bill. "He and his wife spend time in Naples, Fla.," the bishop said on Friday, a day after he detailed a massive restructuring of the Roman Catholic diocese's 124 parishes. "And all he talks about is how vibrant the local parish is: the people going to Mass, the wonderful preaching, concerts with sacred music and popular music.
NEWS
January 7, 2006 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's time for Catholics of the Camden Diocese to own their rightful place in the church, according to Bishop Joseph Galante, who will unveil a "vision for the future" of his diocese at Masses this weekend. "I believe passionately in the idea of the 'Church as the People of God' at the heart of the Second Vatican Council," Galante said in an interview yesterday. "The idea is that there is a fundamental equality among all the baptized. " Galante said he hoped to see laity take a more active role in the affairs of their parishes, freeing priests to devote more time to their sacramental duties.
NEWS
September 22, 2005 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
As District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham stood before the cameras yesterday denouncing the patterns of sexual abuse and cover-ups in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Marie Whitehead listened quietly nearby, wiping away tears. When Abraham called for a series of legal reforms, Whitehead clenched her fist and uttered, "Amen. " In the back of the room, Sister Mary Lou Bishoff, a Philadelphia nun and activist, stared at the floor. "It's horrendous, absolutely horrendous," she said of the grand jury's report that the archdiocese ignored warnings about abusive priests and moved repeat offenders from parish to parish.
NEWS
July 24, 2003
Madison quote on religion taken out of context To convince his readers that the posting of the Ten Commandments on the Chester County Courthouse was a bad idea, Nick O'Dell wrote the following in his July 16, commentary ("A history of state sans church"): "James Madison said of religion: 'What has been its fruits? More or less, in all places, pride and indolence in the clergy; ignorance and servility in the laity; in both, superstition, bigotry and persecution.' " This quotation was O'Dell's attempt to demonstrate that "many of the Founding Fathers were not devoutly religious, and some of the most prominent were not Christians.
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