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Lake Michigan

NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By DAVID S. BRODER
The world is such a sneaky place that even here, at the top of Lake Michigan, one can't get away from it. It surely seemed safe to give you readers a respite from these vaporings while I wandered some of the most beautiful beaches and wooded trails in the world. But no. Saddam Hussein respects vacation no more than he does borders. And so a week that should have demanded nothing more mentally taxing than cutting down the weeds in the driveway and zapping the poison ivy under the landmark pine was marred by earnest discussions of Mideast politics on All Things Considered and bulletins from Baghdad or Moscow or Kennebunkport.
SPORTS
September 11, 2003 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lake Michigan was in full view outside the limo taking Penn State's contingent to downtown Chicago for the Big Ten meetings in late July, so the old man from Brooklyn decided it was a good time to chide the young man from Schuylkill County's coal region. "You see that, Capone, they're called yachts," coach Joe Paterno said to middle linebacker Gino Capone. "You guys don't get to see them where you're from. And that's called a lake. You guys have lakes where you're from?" "I told him, 'No, Coach, we have mines filled with water.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By David S. Broder
After decades of welcome isolation, the residents of this unspoiled island in Lake Michigan now find the world is beating on their door. Until now, they have expressed only a modest interest in the doings of the county government, headquartered in Charlevoix, the closest city on the mainland; less in Lansing and the state government; and virtually none in Washington. But the insulation which has made this such a perfect vacation spot is coming to an end. In October, the Columbus, a German cruise ship with almost 600 passengers and crew, will make a five-hour port call at St. James, the center of island commerce.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1950s and '60s, environmentalists warned that the Great Lakes were dying, becoming a watery toxic-waste dump and a polluted blight on America's reputation worldwide. Today, after 30 years of stricter environmental standards, Lake Michigan, along with a once-even more polluted Lake Erie, is a cautious success story. Environmental officials point to clear evidence - lake water more crystalline than anyone can remember - as the most dramatic proof of how much cleaner the Great Lakes are. But some anglers are saying that Lake Michigan and the other Great Lakes may be too clean, and that the purer water, which makes it possible to see the bottom while swimming off any Chicago beach, adds up to happier swimmers but fewer fish.
NEWS
August 1, 2010
Adaysouting.com offers suggestions for day and weekend trips up to 120 miles from many U.S. locations. What's not: Some activities have descriptions; others do not. Naturally, the items with descriptions are more inviting. The site was started last year by two moms - expect Virginia and the mid-Atlantic region, where they started, to be the strongest. - Jen Leo, Los Angeles Times
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* SIRENS. 10 p.m. tomorrow, USA. * CHICAGOLAND. 10 p.m. tomorrow, CNN. * SAINT GEORGE. 9 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   CHICAGO, increasingly television's kind of town, adds another series to its roster of locally filmed shows tomorrow with the premiere of USA's "Sirens," a wacky Denis Leary-produced comedy about EMTs. But the Windy City's true close-up will occur on CNN, with the launch of "Chicagoland," a documentary series from the Peabody Award-winning team behind Sundance TV's Newark, N.J.-focused "Brick City.
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just when mollusk-watchers think they have the zebra mussel sort of figured out, the thumb-sized, striped-shelled, Eurasian interloper throws them another curve. Chicago is looking into spending $10 million per mile to extend water-intake tunnels up to eight miles into Lake Michigan, so the city's drinking water can be drawn from places that the zebra mussel has yet to infest, places that it supposedly would find inhospitable. City officials are doing this because in recent summers, the mussel - now ubiquitous along the lake shore - has made drinking water smell like dirty socks at the bottom of a college freshman's laundry bag. But recent research in Lake Erie indicates that Chicago's plan could have a fatal flaw: If Lake Michigan's zebra mussels start behaving like Lake Erie's zebra mussels, the pernicious little bivalve might beat the city's tunnels to their destination.
NEWS
April 10, 1986
Not since 1944 when I was stationed at the Naval Armory have I felt the crisp, clear and biting winds coming off Chicago's Lake Michigan. That is, until Buddy Ryan was named head coach of the Eagles. Over 40 years ago I found those winds to be refreshing; yes, even exhilarating. That feeling has returned. Finally we have a coach who has taken charge and is not afraid to identify individual or team shortcomings. Previous coaches have explained away our many losses over the years as being caused by "breakdowns," but not one coach has had the guts to identify who broke.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By Melanie Eversley, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Lake Champlain is all washed up when it comes to being a "Great Lake. " An agreement reached Monday night between Michigan and Vermont Congress members makes it easier for Vermont schools to obtain funds to study environmental problems exclusive to the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. But it reverses the designation of Champlain as a Great Lake that was signed into law earlier this month. "We have agreed to call Lake Champlain a cousin instead of a little brother to those larger lakes in the Midwest, while accomplishing our goal of improving the ecology of the lake," said Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D., Vt.)
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. John Glenn (D., Ohio) yesterday proposed a $40 million plan to control zebra mussels, the tiny striped-shelled mollusks that rode into the Great Lakes on a European tanker three years ago and have spread to clog water- system pipes and threaten fish populations. In its native waters, the zebra mussel's proliferation is checked by natural predators; in North America, it has virtually none. Since the mussels were released into Lake St. Clair along with ballast water from a European tanker, they have spread at a rate of 160 miles per year through the Detroit River and into Lake Erie, and have been reported in the west end of Lake Ontario and in Green and Sturgeon Bays in Lake Michigan.
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