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IN THE NEWS

Lake Michigan

NEWS
November 8, 1998 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ahhh, the beauties of fall in Chicago! The blizzard of vivid leaves in the parks along Lake Michigan. The fat, orange jack-o'-lanterns on the porches of Gold Coast mansions. The first scent of wood smoke from a thousand chimneys under the brilliant orb of a harvest moon. The salmon run at Lincoln Park Lagoon. The salmon run at Lincoln Park Lagoon? "This year, there are some pretty big ones coming in," Mario Rivera said, as he filed to a killing sharpness the barbs of a wicked-looking treble hook.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | By Daniel LeDuc, FOR THE INQUIRER
When I was in college, I took a friend home to Indiana for the weekend to show him Lake Michigan. He had grown up at the Jersey Shore and, on the way to Indiana, made it pretty clear that some lake somewhere in the vast Middle West wasn't going to excite him much. "I'm used to the ocean," he said a bit patronizingly. Then we got to the beach in my hometown and he gazed out, amazed. "You can't see the other side," he said. "That's why," I told him, "it's called a Great Lake.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Daniel LeDuc and Vickie E. LeDuc, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was one of those moments on a summer night we wait for all winter: The sun was expending its last bit of energy to cast a golden glow across the grass where we lay sprawled. Music was drifting over from the outdoor stage at a waterfront restaurant, and sailboats drifted by, moving as lazily as we felt. Our stomachs were full from a delicious dinner. Whatever edge remained from the workweek had been dulled by an extra Saturday night cocktail. As the golden haze turned toward the pink of twilight, we slid into sweatshirts and, making the most strenuous effort of the evening, crossed our legs to settle into the grass a little more deeply.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By David S. Broder
After decades of welcome isolation, the residents of this unspoiled island in Lake Michigan now find the world is beating on their door. Until now, they have expressed only a modest interest in the doings of the county government, headquartered in Charlevoix, the closest city on the mainland; less in Lansing and the state government; and virtually none in Washington. But the insulation which has made this such a perfect vacation spot is coming to an end. In October, the Columbus, a German cruise ship with almost 600 passengers and crew, will make a five-hour port call at St. James, the center of island commerce.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | By Earl I. Shores, FOR THE INQUIRER
The guidebook reasons for a September visit here seemed meager at best. The town's major annual events, the National Blueberry Festival and the Harbor Fest, had already been held (in August and June respectively), and it was too early for the annual show of fall foliage in nearby Van Buren State Park. The Michigan Maritime Museum sounded fascinating, but it alone wasn't enough to make my wife and me stare down the white-line-fever-inducing properties of a 12-hour Interstate drive from our home in Maryland.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The waters are frozen a dull gray around the red-and-white lighthouse here at the southern tip of Lake Michigan, but unlike most winters Chris Furness is not breaking through the ice to head out fishing. Instead, the fisherman is at his other job at the fire department, fretting about his bills and thinking that he and his wife may have to close the fish market that his father started and that has been a local institution for more than a quarter-century. Used to be Furness and his brother and father could fish just about year-round, hauling in thousands of pounds of Lake Michigan yellow perch, a tender, tasty delicacy favored by those who live along the lake's southern rim. But conservation officials, citing a dramatic decline in perch population in Lake Michigan, have put strict restrictions on commercial fishermen like the Furnesses.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | By DAVID S. BRODER
Back in Washington, reports reaching here say, the final hurdles have been cleared for agreement on national energy policy legislation. That's good news for the country and a tribute to Energy Secretary James D. Watkins and the members of Congress from both parties who have been struggling almost since the start of the Bush administration to bring this devilishly difficult task to a successful conclusion. Along with the air- and surface-transportation bills passed in 1990 and 1991, the energy bill represents an example of bipartisan cooperation.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just yards to the west, the lights from 100 office towers silhouette one of the world's most sophisticated skylines. To the southeast, a reddish moon rises in the spring night sky. The air is crisp, the city quiet - it's a perfect time to catch dinner downtown. That's what Mark Jedry was doing. With a party of his old pals from St. Rita's High School the other night, the 30-year-old O'Hare Airport employee was hauling a 12-by-6-foot nylon net up from beneath the water of Lake Michigan, plucking out small, silvery fishes and serving them up, quick- cleaned and fried, on paper towels with hot sauce.
SPORTS
December 17, 1990 | This feature was written by Don Grillet, Demonstration Teacher, Masterman School, School District of Philadelphia. The graphics were conceived by Don Grillet and executed by Daily News staff artist Bruny Roldan. The page was edited by Jerry Carrier of the Daily News
DALLAS QUIZ TIME 1. Texas has many cities and towns located on rivers. Next to each town, write its river. a. Port Arthur --------- d. Austin ------------- b. Laredo ----------- e. Brownsville ---------- c. El Paso ----------- f. Victoria ------------ g. Waco ------------- 2. Name the Texas neighboring states that have the following features. a. White Sands National Monument ---------------- b. Ozark National Forest --------------------- c. Mississippi Delta ------------------------ d. Grand Lake of the Cherokees ----------------- e. Santa Fe National Forest -------------------- f. Indian Nation Turnpike -------------------- g. Will Rogers Turnpike --------------------- h. Lake Charles ------------------------- 3. Texas is in the Central Time Zone.
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