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Lake Ontario

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NEWS
March 22, 1987 | By George Ingram, Special to The Inquirer
A northeast wind at dawn was splattering angry white waves from Lake Ontario onto the Sodus Bay breakwater, and eight-foot swells lurked just beyond the lighthouse that guards this lovely harbor. Aye, mateys, but did Tom Schafer, captain of the 30-foot sport-fisherman Paladin, shiver his timbers at the sight of nasty water? "A good salmon chop," he called the tempest, which to us resembled the heaving North Atlantic in a TV rerun of Victory at Sea. Schafer - a burly, balding and bearded 48-year-old mutineer from a 9-to-5 job with IBM - was guiding six of us from Philadelphia and Lancaster County in pursuit of trophy-sized chinook, or "king" salmon, on Lake Ontario, one of the finest freshwater game-fishing areas in the world.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last 14 years, a Montgomery County fish wholesaler bought thousands of pounds of tainted Lake Ontario eels and sold them to markets and consumers in Philadelphia, around Pennsylvania and elsewhere in the world, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Syracuse, N.Y., said yesterday. Four New York commercial fishermen were indicted yesterday on charges of illegally trafficking in polluted fish to Norristown-based Delaware Valley Fish Co. and other wholesalers in New York and Canada since 1983, in violation of federal and state laws.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The moment undercover agent Stephen Canfield heard about "the guy in Philadelphia," he was hooked with intrigue. Who was he? What sort of connection did he have with the fish smuggling ring Canfield was trying to bust? Canfield, a veteran investigator with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, was at ground zero in a two-year state and federal probe - dubbed "Operation Neptune" - that tangentially led to the nabbing of Sheldon Kratchman, a Montgomery County fish wholesaler who bought thousands of pounds of Lake Ontario eels suffused with pesticides and toxic substances suspected of causing cancer.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By George M. Walsh and Mary Esch, Associated Press
WEBSTER, N.Y. - An ex-con is believed to have killed two firefighters with the same caliber and make military-style rifle used in the Connecticut school massacre after typing a note pledging to burn down his neighborhood and "do what I like doing best, killing people," police said Tuesday as another body, believed to be the gunman's missing sister, was found. William Spengler, 62, who served 17 years in prison for manslaughter in the 1980 hammer slaying of his grandmother, set his house afire before dawn Christmas Eve before taking a revolver, a shotgun, and a semiautomatic rifle to a sniper position outside, Police Chief Gerald Pickering said.
SPORTS
October 4, 1988 | This feature was written by Donnat Grillet, Division of Social Studies, District Four, School District of Philadelphia. The graphics were conceived by Donnat Grillet and drawn by Daily News staff artist Amy Raudenbush. This page was edited by Jerry Carrier of the Daily News
INTRODUCING NEW YORK: 'The Empire State' New York is a triangular state bordered by two of the Great Lakes - Lake Ontario and Lake Erie - to the northwest and west, and the Green Mountains and Berkshire Hills to the east. A portion of New York also borders the Atlantic Ocean. New York ranks second in population (only California is larger) but 30th in area! New York borders Canada across mostly water boundaries - St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Niagara River.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | BY DAVE BARRY
This summer millions of Americans are traveling by air, sometimes all on the same flight. This is the result of the airfare war that occurred recently when major U.S. airlines, in the continuing industry-wide effort to go bankrupt, started offering unbelievable bargains, like $29 round-trip tickets between any two cities with electric lights. Fares were reduced still further by the traditional airline discount of 40 percent for people who can prove that they are dumber than mud, which is designed to insure that every flight has passengers who believe that they can fit garment bags the size of mature bison into the overhead luggage compartment.
NEWS
August 17, 2003 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
Next month will mark the 50th anniversary of one of the great moments in Canadian sports history. The time: 8 p.m, Sept. 9, 1954. The scene: A quarter of a million people converging on Lake Ontario, in Toronto. A traffic jam of vehicles extended 40 miles toward Hamilton in the west and almost as far to the east. Horns honked. Drivers abandoned cars on the road. Boats of all descriptions, from cabin cruisers and water taxis to rowboats, propelled to the scene. The lakefront was ablaze with lights.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | BY DAVE BARRY
I had hoped that we could get the new year under way without any reports of ecologically dangerous shellfish attacking women's undergarments, but I see now that I was a fool. I have here an alarming news article written by Christopher Taylor of The Watertown (N.Y.) Daily Times and sent in by several alert readers. The headline, which I am not making up, says: "Large Colony of Zebra Mussels Found Clinging to Big Brassiere. " In case you haven't heard, the zebra mussel is a hot new environmental threat.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A search for a way to ease the driving burden of an annual fishing excursion to the Canadian province of Ontario in June yielded one of the quickest and most enjoyable international travel experiences available in the Northeast. Lasting about 2 hours and 15 minutes, the trip aboard the new high-speed ferry between Rochester, N.Y., and Toronto promised a touch of luxury and convenience at bargain-basement prices - and a refreshing respite from the long drive from Philadelphia to my destination, Rice Lake, near Peterborough, Ontario, about 60 miles east of Toronto.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The United States and Russia are locked in another cold war, this time over a hole in the ice at the bottom of the world in Antarctica. The Russians lost the real Cold War, but it looks as if they're going to win this one. At issue is their plan to continue drilling a hole they began in 1998 until they poke through the ice into a large, long-buried lake known as Vostok. They've already drilled 2.2 miles down, stopping only about 100 yards from the lake, and have declared their intention to go the rest of the way next year.
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NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By George M. Walsh and Mary Esch, Associated Press
WEBSTER, N.Y. - An ex-con is believed to have killed two firefighters with the same caliber and make military-style rifle used in the Connecticut school massacre after typing a note pledging to burn down his neighborhood and "do what I like doing best, killing people," police said Tuesday as another body, believed to be the gunman's missing sister, was found. William Spengler, 62, who served 17 years in prison for manslaughter in the 1980 hammer slaying of his grandmother, set his house afire before dawn Christmas Eve before taking a revolver, a shotgun, and a semiautomatic rifle to a sniper position outside, Police Chief Gerald Pickering said.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The United States and Russia are locked in another cold war, this time over a hole in the ice at the bottom of the world in Antarctica. The Russians lost the real Cold War, but it looks as if they're going to win this one. At issue is their plan to continue drilling a hole they began in 1998 until they poke through the ice into a large, long-buried lake known as Vostok. They've already drilled 2.2 miles down, stopping only about 100 yards from the lake, and have declared their intention to go the rest of the way next year.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A search for a way to ease the driving burden of an annual fishing excursion to the Canadian province of Ontario in June yielded one of the quickest and most enjoyable international travel experiences available in the Northeast. Lasting about 2 hours and 15 minutes, the trip aboard the new high-speed ferry between Rochester, N.Y., and Toronto promised a touch of luxury and convenience at bargain-basement prices - and a refreshing respite from the long drive from Philadelphia to my destination, Rice Lake, near Peterborough, Ontario, about 60 miles east of Toronto.
NEWS
August 17, 2003 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
Next month will mark the 50th anniversary of one of the great moments in Canadian sports history. The time: 8 p.m, Sept. 9, 1954. The scene: A quarter of a million people converging on Lake Ontario, in Toronto. A traffic jam of vehicles extended 40 miles toward Hamilton in the west and almost as far to the east. Horns honked. Drivers abandoned cars on the road. Boats of all descriptions, from cabin cruisers and water taxis to rowboats, propelled to the scene. The lakefront was ablaze with lights.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | By George Ingram FOR THE INQUIRER
Our captain was frustrated. We were on board his 28-foot charter boat, the Alaskan, trolling for monster chinook salmon four miles off the southeastern shore of Lake Ontario. Five hours earlier - a time so pitch-dark that I marveled at how the captain could navigate - we had left the dock at Mike's Marina on the Little Salmon River in Oswego County, and cruised out into the eastern basin of the Great Lake. Now it was midmorning. Not a single fish had risen from the blue-black depths to attack an arsenal of lures deployed on lines from eight rods on the stern and sides of the boat as it sliced slowly through the water.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The moment undercover agent Stephen Canfield heard about "the guy in Philadelphia," he was hooked with intrigue. Who was he? What sort of connection did he have with the fish smuggling ring Canfield was trying to bust? Canfield, a veteran investigator with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, was at ground zero in a two-year state and federal probe - dubbed "Operation Neptune" - that tangentially led to the nabbing of Sheldon Kratchman, a Montgomery County fish wholesaler who bought thousands of pounds of Lake Ontario eels suffused with pesticides and toxic substances suspected of causing cancer.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last 14 years, a Montgomery County fish wholesaler bought thousands of pounds of tainted Lake Ontario eels and sold them to markets and consumers in Philadelphia, around Pennsylvania and elsewhere in the world, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Syracuse, N.Y., said yesterday. Four New York commercial fishermen were indicted yesterday on charges of illegally trafficking in polluted fish to Norristown-based Delaware Valley Fish Co. and other wholesalers in New York and Canada since 1983, in violation of federal and state laws.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | BY DAVE BARRY
This summer millions of Americans are traveling by air, sometimes all on the same flight. This is the result of the airfare war that occurred recently when major U.S. airlines, in the continuing industry-wide effort to go bankrupt, started offering unbelievable bargains, like $29 round-trip tickets between any two cities with electric lights. Fares were reduced still further by the traditional airline discount of 40 percent for people who can prove that they are dumber than mud, which is designed to insure that every flight has passengers who believe that they can fit garment bags the size of mature bison into the overhead luggage compartment.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | BY DAVE BARRY
I had hoped that we could get the new year under way without any reports of ecologically dangerous shellfish attacking women's undergarments, but I see now that I was a fool. I have here an alarming news article written by Christopher Taylor of The Watertown (N.Y.) Daily Times and sent in by several alert readers. The headline, which I am not making up, says: "Large Colony of Zebra Mussels Found Clinging to Big Brassiere. " In case you haven't heard, the zebra mussel is a hot new environmental threat.
SPORTS
October 4, 1988 | This feature was written by Donnat Grillet, Division of Social Studies, District Four, School District of Philadelphia. The graphics were conceived by Donnat Grillet and drawn by Daily News staff artist Amy Raudenbush. This page was edited by Jerry Carrier of the Daily News
INTRODUCING NEW YORK: 'The Empire State' New York is a triangular state bordered by two of the Great Lakes - Lake Ontario and Lake Erie - to the northwest and west, and the Green Mountains and Berkshire Hills to the east. A portion of New York also borders the Atlantic Ocean. New York ranks second in population (only California is larger) but 30th in area! New York borders Canada across mostly water boundaries - St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Niagara River.
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