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Lance Armstrong

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January 16, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE WORLD Anti-Doping Agency said Tuesday Lance Armstrong must confess under oath to seek a reduction in his lifetime ban from sports for doping during seven Tour de France victories. WADA said it "read with interest media reports suggesting a television 'confession' made by Lance Armstrong" to talk-show host Oprah Winfrey on Monday. Armstrong reportedly hopes to return to competition in recognized triathlon events. However, WADA says "only when Mr. Armstrong makes a full confession under oath - and tells the anti-doping authorities all he knows about doping activities - can any legal and proper process for him to seek any reopening or reconsideration of his lifetime ban commence.
SPORTS
January 9, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE CHIEF of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency told CBS' "60 Minutes Sports" that a representative for Lance Armstrong offered the agency a "donation" in excess of $150,000 several years before a USADA investigation led to Armstrong being stripped of seven Tour de France titles. In an interview on the show's premier airing Wednesday night, USADA CEO Travis Tygart said he was "stunned" when he received the offer in 2004 and USADA didn't hesitate to turn it down. Armstrong's attorney, Tim Herman, denied such an offer was made.
SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Out for a Sunday morning jog in bright sunshine, Lance Armstrong hardly looked like a man about to finally confront the doping scandal that has shadowed his storied career like an angry storm cloud. "I'm calm, I'm at ease and ready to speak candidly," Armstrong told the Associated Press , referring to his interview Monday with Oprah Winfrey. In what's been billed as a "no-holds barred" session, the cyclist is expected to reverse course after a decade of denials and apologize for doping, as well as offer a limited confession about his role at the head of a long-running scheme to dominate the Tour de France with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
January 16, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The deconstruction of Lance Armstrong's legend, which the disgraced cyclist built with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs and savagely defended whenever his dark secret was challenged, continued Tuesday, two days before the world at last gets to hear his confession. According to reports confirmed by Oprah Winfrey, Armstrong admitted to cheating during a 21/2-hour interview with the celebrity host that will be televised over two nights, beginning Thursday. While it would be Armstrong's first public acknowledgment that the suspicions that long shadowed his unprecedented success were true, Winfrey said he "did not come clean in the manner that I expected.
SPORTS
August 31, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
LANCE ARMSTRONG introduced himself as a seven-time Tour de France champion at a cancer conference in Montreal on Wednesday. "My name is Lance Armstrong. I am a cancer survivor," he said to open his speech to the World Cancer Congress. "I'm a father of five. And yes, I won the Tour de France seven times. " Armstrong announced last week he would no longer challenge the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's drug charges against him. USADA threw out his competitive victories dating to 1998, which would include all seven Tour wins.
SPORTS
January 13, 2013 | Associated Press
Cyclist Lance Armstrong , stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and given a lifetime ban, will make a limited confession to doping in an interview with Oprah Winfrey , according to a person with knowledge who spoke to the Associated Press. The 41-year-old Armstrong, who has long denied doping, will also reportedly offer an apology during the interview, scheduled to be taped Monday at his home in Austin, Texas, and televised Thursday. While not directly saying he would confess or apologize, Armstrong texted the AP on Saturday, saying: "I told [Winfrey]
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | Associated Press
Lance Armstrong ended a decade of denial by confessing to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, a person familiar with the situation told the Associated Press. The admission Monday came hours after an emotional apology by Armstrong to the Livestrong charity that he founded and turned into a global institution on the strength of his celebrity as a cancer survivor. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the interview is to be broadcast Thursday on Winfrey's network.
SPORTS
October 24, 2012 | Associated Press
GENEVA - Mired in a crisis caused by the Lance Armstrong doping affair, cycling faces a long uphill trek to regain credibility. Still, the head of the sport's governing body said cycling can succeed despite the doubts of many, including anti-doping leaders who on Tuesday called for Armstrong-era officials to be removed. "By the decisions we have taken it has given us the moral authority," UCI President Pat McQuaid told the Associated Press after his group accepted the sanctions that stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles and all other race results since August 1998.
SPORTS
January 31, 2013 | Associated Press
LONDON - A truth and reconciliation program is the "only way" to rid cycling of performance-enhancing drugs, and the sport's governing body should have no role in the process, Lance Armstrong said in an interview with a British publication. Cyclingnews on Wednesday published questions and answers it exchanged with Armstrong through e-mails and texts. In an interview two weeks ago with Oprah Winfrey, the cyclist acknowledged for the first time that he doped to win a record seven Tour de France titles.
SPORTS
January 19, 2013 | By Liz Clarke, Washington Post
Former teammate Floyd Landis has targeted not only Lance Armstrong but also three of Armstrong's closest associates - his longtime manager, his closest friend, and his deep-pocketed benefactor - in the whistle-blower lawsuit that has been under judicial seal for more than 21/2 years. And Landis reserves the right to add others to the qui tam suit, which claims that Armstrong and his associates defrauded the federal government by accepting roughly $30 million in sponsorship money to bankroll a U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling team that was fueled by performance-enhancing drugs.
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SPORTS
July 28, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It has been 10 years since Lance Armstrong won the Tour de France for the seventh straight time, victories which were stricken from the record book when Armstrong admitted to a doping program of such sophistication and expense that it defied detection. Except to the naked eye, of course. As Armstrong blasted through the time trials and climbed the hills far better than any of his rivals, it shouldn't have been possible for one man to be that much better for that long than the other elite cyclists of his generation, particularly since the best ones had programs of their own. It just didn't look right and, naturally, it wasn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Alex Gibney's The Armstrong Lie started off as something else altogether: a celebration, not an indictment, a documentary about Lance Armstrong's 2009 Tour de France comeback try. Four years after announcing his retirement from professional cycling - a profession that had netted the Texas sports icon a record seven consecutive Tour de France wins - Armstrong was back in the race. And Gibney, the Oscar-winning documentarian ( Taxi to the Dark Side ), was invited along for the ride.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN ALEX GIBNEY started to follow Lance Armstrong around to document his pro-cycling comeback in 2009, he noticed something strange. Cycling insiders with cameras and microphones, looking askance at him, promising to make the "real" Lance Armstrong documentary. Gibney, a respected and decorated documentary filmmaker, was naturally confused. If they were making the real documentary, what, he wondered, was he making? You get the complicated answer in "The Armstrong Lie," Gibney's examination of the disgraced cyclist, whose hypercompetitive personality has many facets.
SPORTS
July 23, 2013 | Associated Press
PARIS - Chris Froome won the 100th Tour de France on Sunday and immediately vowed that his victory wouldn't be stripped for doping as Lance Armstrong's were. "This is one yellow jersey that will stand the test of time," said the British rider, who dominated rivals over three weeks on the road and adroitly dealt with doping suspicions off it. Exceptionally, the 100th Tour treated itself to a nighttime finish on the Champs-Elysees. The famous avenue and the Arc de Triomphe at the top of it were bathed in yellow light - emphasizing the canary yellow of Froome's famous jersey.
SPORTS
July 23, 2013 | Associated Press
PARIS - Chris Froome won the 100th Tour de France yesterday, and immediately vowed that his victory wouldn't be stripped for doping as Lance Armstrong's were. "This is one yellow jersey that will stand the test of time," said the British rider who dominated rivals over 3 weeks on the road and adroitly dealt with doping suspicions off it. Exceptionally, the 100th Tour treated itself to a nighttime finish on the Champs-Elysees. The famous avenue and the Arc de Triomphe at the top of it were bathed in yellow light - emphasizing the canary yellow of Froome's famous jersey.
SPORTS
July 19, 2013 | Associated Press
CHORGES, France - Even when he expects to lose, Tour de France champion-in-the-making Chris Froome cannot help but win. He is that strong and he is making it look easy. On a day when the British rider was planning to save some energy for the mountains, Froome still brushed aside the field and took his third stage win of this 100th Tour. Alberto Contador, Froome's Spanish rival still trying to make a fight of this one-sided battle, gave his all in Wednesday's Alpine time trial.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013 | Associated Press
GAP, France - Hurtling too fast for comfort down a twisty, turning foothill of the Alps, Tour de France leader Chris Froome faced a high-speed choice between risk and reward. The Briton knew that 10 years ago on exactly the same descent, Joseba Beloki shattered his leg, elbow and wrist rounding a corner too fast and Lance Armstrong plowed into a field to avoid the prone Spaniard howling in pain. So Froome wanted to go easy. Trouble was, Alberto Contador didn't. Against his better instincts, Froome chased after his Spanish rival who sped down the treacherous stretch with asphalt made gooey and slippery by the July heat.
SPORTS
June 29, 2013 | By John Leicester, Associated Press
PORTO VECCHIO, Corsica - Lance Armstrong made himself the uninvited guest at the Tour de France on Friday, coming back to haunt the 100th edition of the race and infuriating riders both past and present by talking at length in a newspaper interview about doping in the sport. Armstrong told Le Monde that he still considers himself the record-holder for Tour victories, even though all seven of his titles from 1999-2005 were stripped from him last year for doping. He said his life has been ruined by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency investigation that exposed as lies his years of denials that he and his teammates doped.
SPORTS
May 29, 2013 | Daily News staff and wire reports
NIKE, WHICH helped build Lance Armstrong's Livestrong cancer charity into a global brand and introduced its familiar yellow wristband, is cutting ties with the foundation. The breakup was announced yesterday by Livestrong officials. According to Livestrong and Nike, the company will stop making Livestrong apparel after 2013, but will honor the financial terms of their deal until it expires in 2014. Financial terms were not released. The breakup is the latest fallout from the former cyclist's doping scandal.
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