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Lance Armstrong Foundation

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October 18, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
LANCE ARMSTRONG stepped down as chairman of his Livestrong cancer-fighting charity, and Nike severed ties with him as fallout from the doping scandal swirling around the famed cyclist escalated Wednesday. Radio Shack also announced it had severed its ties, and Anheuser-Busch said it would not renew its contract with him when it expires at the end of the year. Armstrong announced his move at the charity in an early-morning statement. Within minutes, Nike said it would end its relationship with him "due to the seemingly insurmountable evidence that Lance Armstrong participated in doping and misled Nike for more than a decade.
SPORTS
December 25, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Lance Armstrong may be busy baby-sitting between two major races next year. Armstrong, who won the Tour de France seven consecutive years after overcoming testicular cancer, and his girlfriend, Anna Hansen, are expecting a baby in June. He is scheduled to compete in the Giro d'Italia, which runs May 9-31, and the Tour de France, which begins July 4. "Anna and I are thrilled to confirm that we are expecting in June and our families are ecstatic and grateful," Armstrong said in a statement released Tuesday night.
SPORTS
August 20, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Lance Armstrong is capitalizing on his Tour de France victory. Armstrong has signed a contract extension with his team, U.S. Postal Service, that will pay him $2 million in 2000, four times his 1999 base salary. He also has signed a string of new endorsement deals worth as much as $6 million through the year 2004, the Austin (Texas) American-Statesman reported yesterday. U.S. Postal Service team representatives didn't immediately return calls. "Lance is somewhat astounded by what's happening now," said Armstrong's agent, Bill Stapleton.
SPORTS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Lance Armstrong stepped down as chairman of his Livestrong cancer-fighting charity while Nike and Anheuser-Busch each said they were cutting ties with him as fallout from the doping scandal that has swirled around the famed cyclist escalated Wednesday. Armstrong announced his move at the charity in an early-morning statement. Within minutes, Nike said that it would end its relationship with him "due to the seemingly insurmountable evidence that Lance Armstrong participated in doping and misled Nike for more than a decade.
NEWS
April 23, 2009 | By STACEY BURLING Inquirer Staff Writer
WHEN GWEN DARIEN was treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 15 years ago, no one gave much thought to how she might feel if she lived. "Everything was focused on treating the disease and getting the cancer out of your body," said Darien, now director of survivor and patient advocacy at the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research. Long-term survival after cancer treatment was still so unusual that no one considered that the radiation and chemotherapy she received might cause side effects years later.
NEWS
February 3, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Between May 2006 and March 2007, Cheryl Bayard's life was all about fighting her breast cancer. There was surgery, radiation and chemotherapy to endure. She saw doctors and nurses constantly. Then it was over. Except that it wasn't. "All of a sudden, they say, 'That's it,' " said Bayard, a retired art teacher who lives near Tylersport in Montgomery County. "You're left with, Now what?" Bayard was on her own to piece together information about her future medical needs from fellow survivors, guest speakers at support groups and her doctors.
SPORTS
July 24, 2000 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lance Armstrong, who recovered from cancer to win the Tour de France a year ago, repeated his remarkable feat yesterday in an extraordinary encore performance that ended on the Champs-Elysees. "It's bigger than last year, because I know what it means," Armstrong said afterward. "Last year, I didn't know what it meant. " The 28-year-old American, riding for the U.S. Postal Service team, posted an overall time of 92 hours, 33 minutes, 8 seconds, or an average pace of 24.5 miles an hour.
SPORTS
August 20, 2010
CHRIS CARMICHAEL wasn't at the lunch at the Mexican restaurant in 1997 when Lance Armstrong began jotting on a napkin ideas about a foundation he wanted to start. But Carmichael had already begun what has become a 20-year relationship as Armstrong's personal trainer, and he knew that if Armstrong put as much dedication into helping fellow cancer survivors as he had into becoming a world-class cyclist, things would be good. "I don't think anyone really knew what to expect when he said he wanted to start a foundation," Carmichael said.
SPORTS
January 20, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
As a fellow cancer survivor, I'd love to give Lance Armstrong a pass. It's an insidious disease that never lets go of you, even after you've gone into remission and seem to be OK. More than 2 decades after I was "successfully" treated for Hodgkin's disease in 1986, the Big C reminded me of its claim over me when I learned that the radiation therapy I underwent had slowly destroyed a heart valve and forced replacement surgery in 2009. One operation, a host of complications, one monthlong induced coma, 10 amputated toes and 3 1/2 years of physical, mental and spiritual rehabilitation later, I'd say I've gotten back about 92 percent of the person I was before.
SPORTS
July 21, 2005 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a cancer survivor, Ed DeChellis wears the yellow "Live Strong" band of the Lance Armstrong Foundation on his right wrist. Encircling his left wrist is a blue band, imprinted with Family, a word he hopes will be at the heart of a new Penn State basketball era. While no one, least of all the Nittany Lions' third-year coach, would attempt to equate the seriousness of those two disparate causes, his colorful wristbands represent similar virtues to...
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SPORTS
January 20, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
As a fellow cancer survivor, I'd love to give Lance Armstrong a pass. It's an insidious disease that never lets go of you, even after you've gone into remission and seem to be OK. More than 2 decades after I was "successfully" treated for Hodgkin's disease in 1986, the Big C reminded me of its claim over me when I learned that the radiation therapy I underwent had slowly destroyed a heart valve and forced replacement surgery in 2009. One operation, a host of complications, one monthlong induced coma, 10 amputated toes and 3 1/2 years of physical, mental and spiritual rehabilitation later, I'd say I've gotten back about 92 percent of the person I was before.
SPORTS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Lance Armstrong stepped down as chairman of his Livestrong cancer-fighting charity while Nike and Anheuser-Busch each said they were cutting ties with him as fallout from the doping scandal that has swirled around the famed cyclist escalated Wednesday. Armstrong announced his move at the charity in an early-morning statement. Within minutes, Nike said that it would end its relationship with him "due to the seemingly insurmountable evidence that Lance Armstrong participated in doping and misled Nike for more than a decade.
SPORTS
October 18, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
LANCE ARMSTRONG stepped down as chairman of his Livestrong cancer-fighting charity, and Nike severed ties with him as fallout from the doping scandal swirling around the famed cyclist escalated Wednesday. Radio Shack also announced it had severed its ties, and Anheuser-Busch said it would not renew its contract with him when it expires at the end of the year. Armstrong announced his move at the charity in an early-morning statement. Within minutes, Nike said it would end its relationship with him "due to the seemingly insurmountable evidence that Lance Armstrong participated in doping and misled Nike for more than a decade.
SPORTS
August 20, 2010
CHRIS CARMICHAEL wasn't at the lunch at the Mexican restaurant in 1997 when Lance Armstrong began jotting on a napkin ideas about a foundation he wanted to start. But Carmichael had already begun what has become a 20-year relationship as Armstrong's personal trainer, and he knew that if Armstrong put as much dedication into helping fellow cancer survivors as he had into becoming a world-class cyclist, things would be good. "I don't think anyone really knew what to expect when he said he wanted to start a foundation," Carmichael said.
NEWS
April 23, 2009 | By STACEY BURLING Inquirer Staff Writer
WHEN GWEN DARIEN was treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 15 years ago, no one gave much thought to how she might feel if she lived. "Everything was focused on treating the disease and getting the cancer out of your body," said Darien, now director of survivor and patient advocacy at the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research. Long-term survival after cancer treatment was still so unusual that no one considered that the radiation and chemotherapy she received might cause side effects years later.
NEWS
February 3, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Between May 2006 and March 2007, Cheryl Bayard's life was all about fighting her breast cancer. There was surgery, radiation and chemotherapy to endure. She saw doctors and nurses constantly. Then it was over. Except that it wasn't. "All of a sudden, they say, 'That's it,' " said Bayard, a retired art teacher who lives near Tylersport in Montgomery County. "You're left with, Now what?" Bayard was on her own to piece together information about her future medical needs from fellow survivors, guest speakers at support groups and her doctors.
SPORTS
December 25, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Lance Armstrong may be busy baby-sitting between two major races next year. Armstrong, who won the Tour de France seven consecutive years after overcoming testicular cancer, and his girlfriend, Anna Hansen, are expecting a baby in June. He is scheduled to compete in the Giro d'Italia, which runs May 9-31, and the Tour de France, which begins July 4. "Anna and I are thrilled to confirm that we are expecting in June and our families are ecstatic and grateful," Armstrong said in a statement released Tuesday night.
SPORTS
July 21, 2005 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a cancer survivor, Ed DeChellis wears the yellow "Live Strong" band of the Lance Armstrong Foundation on his right wrist. Encircling his left wrist is a blue band, imprinted with Family, a word he hopes will be at the heart of a new Penn State basketball era. While no one, least of all the Nittany Lions' third-year coach, would attempt to equate the seriousness of those two disparate causes, his colorful wristbands represent similar virtues to...
SPORTS
July 24, 2000 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lance Armstrong, who recovered from cancer to win the Tour de France a year ago, repeated his remarkable feat yesterday in an extraordinary encore performance that ended on the Champs-Elysees. "It's bigger than last year, because I know what it means," Armstrong said afterward. "Last year, I didn't know what it meant. " The 28-year-old American, riding for the U.S. Postal Service team, posted an overall time of 92 hours, 33 minutes, 8 seconds, or an average pace of 24.5 miles an hour.
SPORTS
August 20, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Lance Armstrong is capitalizing on his Tour de France victory. Armstrong has signed a contract extension with his team, U.S. Postal Service, that will pay him $2 million in 2000, four times his 1999 base salary. He also has signed a string of new endorsement deals worth as much as $6 million through the year 2004, the Austin (Texas) American-Statesman reported yesterday. U.S. Postal Service team representatives didn't immediately return calls. "Lance is somewhat astounded by what's happening now," said Armstrong's agent, Bill Stapleton.
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