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NEWS
March 5, 1995 | By Ilene R. Prusher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four years after residential wells near the Second Avenue landfill were found to have dangerously high levels of PCE, hydrologists at the state Department of Environmental Resources have concluded that the borough-owned landfill is not the main source of contamination, after all. Phoenixville officials said from the beginning that the now-defunct landfill was not the source of the PCE - short for perchloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene....
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Residents near the Bethayres landfill are wary about a recent decision by the Department of Environmental Resources to deny renewal permits to the owners of the dump. "They'll just appeal it," Emil Dix said of the department's July 10 letter to landfill owners that called for the shutdown of the 35-acre demolition waste landfill if a liner is not installed. Dix and more than 30 of his neighbors have been fighting with Mignatti Bros., owner of the Bethayres Reclamation Center landfill in Lower Moreland Township for the last seven years.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
The Lower Moreland Township Board of Commissioners has voted, 4-0, to appoint legal counsel and hold a hearing Aug. 23 on the request of two landfill owners that their property be made a mobile-home district. Theophile and Joseph Mignatti are seeking to have their 34.76-acre landfill site rezoned from a single-family residential district to a mobile-home park. Twenty residents attended the meeting Tuesday night. Commissioners Emily- Jane Lemole and Bernard Kanefsky were absent.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
The cleanup of the 46-acre landfill on River Road in Croydon will be discussed Thursday at a public meeting at the Croydon Fire House Annex. The Croydon Civic Association initiated the meeting when it asked Rohm & Haas Co., the owner of the landfill, to update the community on cleanup plans, said Theresa Bradley, the civic association's president. The meeting is scheduled to start at 8 p.m. in the annex, which is across the street from the Croydon Fire Company firehouse at State Street and Christy Avenue.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Gerald Luongo said yesterday that a recently discovered old landfill under a portion of the Colts Neck Estates housing development poses no health risk to nearby residents. Luongo declined to elaborate further on the results of testing by JCA Engineering Associates Inc. of Mount Laurel, which he reviewed on Wednesday. He said a full report on the tests would be released at a public meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at Chestnut Ridge Middle School, 641 Hurffville-Cross Keys Rd. "What is there can be dealt with," Luongo said.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
In the ongoing battle to control odor, the Valley Forge Sewer Authority has yielded to local pressure and agreed to ship more sludge to landfills. "The more you have, the more likely it is to produce odors," said Joseph S. Bateman, general manager of the sewage treatment facility in Schuylkill Township. The sewage treatment plant, which serves eight Main Line municipalities, is expected to produce about 11,300 tons of sludge this year, Bateman said. Of that, about 2,100 tons of the claylike residue was scheduled to go to a landfill.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its odors and liquefied decomposed waste so worrisome to neighboring residents, a Lower Moreland landfill provided a setting last weekend for the kind of minor political drama that seems to occur most often around election time. For three years, the Terwood Road landfill, a final resting place for demolition debris, has been the source of neighbors' complaints because of its irritating odors and the fears of possible water contamination that would affect backyard wells. On Saturday, state Sen. Stewart J. Greenleaf (R., Montgomery)
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
In 1974, Jess Bewley built his dream home - a two-story Colonial on five acres in London Grove Township. The 3,000-square-foot house has seven bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, two fireplaces and a two-car garage. The former London Grove supervisor and his wife, Evelyn, raised eight children in that home. Today, the dream is headed for the dumps - literally. All the neighbors have sold out, the well water is contaminated, and Bewley says he and his family are ready to move on. But not before he gets his price - $88,000 an acre, $440,000 for the whole kit and caboodle.
NEWS
December 10, 1988 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection agreed yesterday to give the owner and operators of the GEMS landfill in Gloucester Township until next month to consent to a plan to clean up the hazardous-waste site. John A. MacDonald, DEP's assistant director for cost recovery, said the state will hire contractors for the first phase of the cleanup if the parties liable for the site had not signed a consent order and arranged to pay for the project themselves by Jan. 20. The state at first set a deadline of Nov. 30, but the owner and operators won a delay by seeking a temporary restraining order from U.S. District Court Judge Stanley S. Brotman.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Think of it as Williamsburg North. Or Mackinac Mainland. Or Disneyland Goes Dutch. Imagine horse-drawn carriages on car-free streets, a grand Victorian hotel, sprawling golf courses, fine homes, tastefully quaint shops, a convention center, a theater. And a garbage dump. This is the dream of suburban developer Raymond Carr, and the nightmare of his neighbors. This is the prospective new borough of New Morgan, which Carr wants to carve out of two townships in Berks County, an area that is home to 4,200 acres of hills and trees, an abandoned Bethlehem Steel iron-ore mine, and 15 people.
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BUSINESS
May 13, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
New Jersey's largest electric utility wants to dramatically step up the number of ratepayer-supported solar projects it installs on landfills and brownfields. Public Service Electric & Gas Co. asked state regulators Wednesday to allow it to spend $275 million to install 100 megawatts of solar panels, nearly tripling the capacity of its landfill and brownfield solar farms. PSE&G's proposal is the latest edition of its seven-year-old Solar 4 All program, which initially aimed at installing thousands of solar panels atop its utility poles.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The last of nearly 200 electricians and laborers at a Mount Holly landfill finished last week, leaving behind a sprawling solar farm that will capture the sun's rays and convert them into energy. The solar farm atop the former L&D Landfill has begun silently churning out about 12.9 megawatts of energy. That's enough electricity to power about 2,000 homes, PSE&G officials say. "It's our largest solar farm in New Jersey," said Todd Hranicka, director of Solar Energy for the utility company, as rows and rows of 42,000 panels were being installed on a gray day last month.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Named one of the most toxic dumps in the nation three decades ago, the weed-choked L&D Landfill in South Jersey has long been idle, towering above a busy four-lane highway that connects strip malls with farmland. But in recent months, the 200-acre former landfill in Burlington County has been a hub of activity as 150 workers install nearly 42,000 gleaming solar panels - carefully - a few feet above the clay cap that environmental agencies long ago ordered to protect the public from the hazardous chemicals buried below.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Acting on long-standing complaints about stench coming across the Delaware River, a state agency on Monday fined the owners of Bucks County's aging Tullytown landfill $500,000 for failing to control odors and to treat wastewater promptly. The Department of Environmental Protection also said Waste Management Inc. had failed to treat water that flows through the mountains of garbage at two other dumps it owns in neighboring Falls Township. For years, New Jersey residents, particularly those in Florence, have complained about odors borne on the prevailing winds from the west.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials stood in front of a verdant baseball diamond Monday morning in Camden. The field used to be a landfill where folks from across the city dumped their trash, including chemicals and medical waste. "As I look out behind me, I remember what it once was," U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D., N.J) said. But Norcross joined EPA officials not to tout a mission accomplished, but instead to focus on an area behind the ball field and playground, a part of the former landfill site that is not yet ready for development.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Blosenski Jr., 71, of Honey Brook, the founder of a trash hauling company in Chester County, died Tuesday, Sept. 23, of cancer at his home. He was president of Blosenski Disposal Service in Elverson, which he started in 1962 with a pickup truck in his neighborhood. He owned and operated the refuse business for 30 years. In 1994, the firm was bought by his son Anthony J. Sr. and renamed A.J. Blosenski Inc. Trash & Recycling Service. Joseph Blosenski became a vice president of his son's company.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
DEPTFORD A large solar farm will provide a new purpose for a forlorn landfill in Deptford. The state Board of Public Utilities has granted conditional certification to Public Service Electric & Gas Co. to build its solar array on a 32-acre section of the Kinsley Landfill, which stretches for more than 100 acres. "We're all for it," Deptford Mayor Ray Medany said this week, noting an inability to develop the site for commercial or residential use. The farm will be the largest in PSE&G's solar-site portfolio.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Michael Kunzelman and Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press
BOSTON - Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhohkar Tsarnaev was moved from a hospital to a federal prison medical center while FBI agents searched for evidence Friday in a landfill near the college he was attending. Tsarnaev, 19, was taken from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he was recovering from a throat wound and other injuries suffered during an attempt to elude police last week, and was transferred to the Federal Medical Center Devens, about 40 miles from Boston, the U.S. Marshals Service said.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | THE WASHINGTON POST
MAYBE IT'S because they live just a few miles from a stone memorial to Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson's severed left arm. But when a group of residents from Virginia's Northern Neck heard that the cremated body parts of American troops had been dumped unceremoniously in a local landfill, they knew what to do: Mark the place - rotting garbage and all - as sacred ground. "People bring trash here. That's what it is, a dump," said Richard Lorey, an Army veteran who lives a few miles from the King George County Landfill just east of Fredericksburg.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The head of the Air Force on Wednesday disputed a report that some unidentified remains from the Sept. 11, 2001, plane crash site near Shanksville, Pa., had been disposed of in a landfill, casting more confusion on an episode that has embarrassed the Pentagon and Dover Air Force Base, which handles the remains of the nation's war dead. A report commissioned by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and released Tuesday found that some unidentifiable remains of victims from the terrorist attack on the Pentagon and the United Airlines Flight 93 crash near Shanksville were "placed in sealed containers that were provided to a biomedical waste disposal contractor.
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