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Landfill

NEWS
June 6, 1989 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
The firm hired to begin cleanup work at the GEMS landfill was forced to delay bringing equipment onto the site for about 12 hours yesterday after a protest group blocked the entrance to the toxic-waste dump in Gloucester Township. Officials from Canonie Environmental Systems brought the equipment onto the landfill property on Hickstown Road at 7:30 p.m., after members of the Neighborhood Toxic Cleanup Emergency ended 10 hours of picketing at 5 p.m.. Loretta Fortuna, president of NTCE, said she was angered by Canonie's decision to bring equipment onto the site last night.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Gloucester County Board of Freeholders last night hired the engineering firm of Malcolm Pirnie Inc. to review a 1984 recommendation to construct the county's landfill in South Harrison Township. The freeholders voted 5-1 for the contract, after South Harrison residents objected that the freeholders should also consider additional countywide surveys done before the 1984 study by Gerald E. Speitel Associates. "It's another railroad job. It's plain," South Harrison Mayor Russell Marino said after the session in the old county courthouse on Broad Street.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
The Winslow Township Sanitary Landfill will close on Dec. 31 if the state Department of Environmental Protection approves that date. The Township Committee authorized the proposed closing date in a letter mailed yesterday to the DEP. Citing a 60 percent reduction in the waste flow since July 1, and a 20 percent reduction of overall waste during the "colder months," the letter said, the landfill should be kept open for the next four months....
NEWS
July 1, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Contractors began yesterday to install the first layer of a double lining along the base of the Gloucester County landfill in South Harrison - putting into place the most controversial feature of the dump since the site was approved by county officials nearly 18 months ago. About 10 workers began installing the so-called secondary liner in 70-by- 300-foot sheets of polyvinylchloride (PVC), stretching the 30-millimeter- thick plasticlike carpeters across one of two 7.5-acre basins in the earth off Swedesboro-Monroeville Road.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Kevin McKinney, Special to The Inquirer
Plans for an expansive 70-acre recreation park in the Kennett Square area, estimated to cost $2.5 million, have been delayed indefinitely due to concerns over a former landfill on the site. The Southeastern Chester County Refuse Authority, which operated the landfill from 1968 to 1978, is concerned that 15 acres of residential development intended to abut the park would increase liability for the authority, according to a news release from the Kennett Area Park Authority, which planned the development of the park.
NEWS
July 24, 2000 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three months after announcing its intentions to pile waste higher at the county landfill, the Gloucester County Improvement Authority has taken steps to widen it underground as well. The move has sparked controversy among political foes and original planners of the 15-year-old landfill. According to David Shields, the authority's executive director, the agency plans to broaden the landfill on the 54-acre site for solid waste with a 400,000-cubic-yard pit. The pit - or cell, as it is technically known - would be paid through the authority's budget, he said.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Lynda Macellaro, Special to The Inquirer
To help alleviate public concern, the Tullytown Borough Council decided to hire an outside laboratory for $30,000 a year to test water and air quality at the Tullytown Resources landfill starting next month. The landfill, which is located on a 120-acre tract on Bordentown Road, has concerned borough residents since it was created in 1987, said borough manager Robert Shellenberger. "Just the nature of a landfill brings negative publicity," Shellenberger said. "We've done the best we can to come up with a solution to this problem.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Michelle Braly Shemet, Special to The Inquirer
Kennett Township Supervisors agreed last week to subdivide a section of the proposed Anson B. Nixon Park parcel in order to separate what was once a landfill from the remaining property. The land on which the landfill stood was meant to be a baseball field. But DER regulations and concern over the landfill's potential danger prevents the township from being able to use the area. According to the township, new DER regulations state that the landfill, which has not been used for at least 10 years, must be graded at a 3 percent slope.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | By Janet Perrella, Special to The Inquirer
Maple Shade officials said last night that they would protest a state order requiring them to check for possible pollution at three sites that the state says are former landfills. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection notified the council in December that it would have to apply for discharge permits for the three sites. The permits would require the township to install monitoring wells, pay permit fees and meet all DEP standards for closed landfills, township officals said.
NEWS
January 20, 1986 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
A group of residents has complained to the Lower Moreland commissioners about headaches and breathing difficulties that they say may be caused by a landfill in their section of the township. Five homeowners went to the board's meeting on Wednesday, and their complaints were the same. They wanted to know what was being done about foul odors they said were coming from the Bethayres Reclamation Center, a landfill on Valley and Welsh Roads. "It's getting worse and has been progressively worse since last spring - you can't breathe," said Jay Sherman of Valley Road.
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