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Landfill

NEWS
May 26, 2007 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The trash giant Waste Management will pay more than $700,000 in fines for violating state emissions standards at its Pottstown landfill in 2004. Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection officials said yesterday that the hefty fine reflected the high number of citations Waste Management Disposal Services of PA Inc. received. The landfill, in West Pottsgrove Township, Montgomery County, was closed 18 months ago. Tests done on a pipeline at the landfill in May 2004 showed excessive flow of gas - generated by decomposing trash - and a high rate of carbon monoxide emissions from one of the landfill's flares.
NEWS
December 10, 2006 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harriet Lewis began to wonder what was buried behind her Franklinville home the day she spied men in white coveralls drilling into the earth. "Routine inspections," they told her. Years later, in the mid-1980s, she and her Gloucester County neighbors learned otherwise. Wells supplying their drinking water contained a toxic stew of mercury, lead, benzene, chloroform and other chemicals leaching from the long-abandoned Franklin Township Sanitary Landfill. The residents demanded to know how about 30 ranch homes could have been built on or near a toxic dump.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
Fast-growing Burlington County faces a perpetual balancing act to provide affordable services, preserve farmland, and encourage reinvestment in aging communities. Incumbent Freeholders James K. Wujcik and William S. Haines Jr., both Republicans, have worked hard toward achieving those goals during multiple terms on the county governing board. They're both better qualified to continue serving than Democratic challengers Gail Cook and Sharon Atkinson. Wujcik, of Cinnaminson, was appointed in 1997.
NEWS
October 10, 2006 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The contents of "Landfill," a short story by acclaimed writer Joyce Carol Oates, sound eerily familiar: A college freshman, after a night of heavy drinking, is either pushed down a trash chute or falls in on his own, and ends up in a Dumpster. Weeks later, his mangled body is found in a landfill. "Landfill," published in the New Yorker last week, is sparking a furor at the College of New Jersey, which is still reeling from the death of John A. Fiocco Jr. "For people who are grieving, this story can be very painful," TCNJ spokesman Matt Golden said yesterday.
NEWS
May 17, 2006 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The parents of John Fiocco Jr., a freshman at the College of New Jersey whose mangled body was found last month in a Bucks County landfill, have hired a high-profile lawyer, a private investigator, and a world-renowned forensic pathologist to explore whether foul play was involved with the death of their son. New Jersey state troopers found the body of Fiocco, 19, on April 25, but authorities have not said how he died or whether they considered his...
NEWS
April 26, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Authorities may have finally found 19-year-old freshman John Fiocco Jr., whose disappearance last month shook the College of New Jersey's suburban Trenton campus and gripped the region. But yesterday's discovery was hardly cause for celebration. Exactly a month after the Gloucester County teen vanished from his dormitory, investigators combing a Bucks County landfill found a body. Television helicopters caught on tape the ominous scene at the sprawling Tullytown dump: white-suited officials loading a body bag into a coroner's van. The New Jersey State Police, the agency heading the investigation, would not confirm that human remains had been discovered.
NEWS
April 2, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Authorities began searching at a Bucks County landfill complex yesterday for a missing College of New Jersey student whose blood was found in a trash receptacle outside his dormitory. They are trying to determine what became of John Fiocco Jr., a 19-year-old freshman from Sewell who has been missing for a week. Capt. Al Della Fave, a New Jersey state police spokesman, said that the search could go on "for days if not weeks" at the expansive GROWS and Tullytown landfills, where refuse from the college in Ewing Township was dumped.
NEWS
April 1, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
It was blood inside the college dorm Dumpster, and it did belong to John Fiocco Jr. And now that authorities know it for sure, they are shifting the focus of their search for the missing 19-year-old freshman from the College of New Jersey campus to two nearby Bucks County landfills. Investigators yesterday said they would begin digging the trash piles today for any evidence related to Fiocco's disappearance, one week ago today. They're hoping not to find a body. While the details sounded ominous and investigators said they were not ruling anything out, they continued to caution people not to make assumptions.
NEWS
December 8, 2005 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Falls Township set out last year to update the contract it has with the company that operates the giant landfill in the township, officials decided for the first time to enlist the help of an outside law firm. What the township ended up with, according to one of its attorneys, was the "largest, nonpublic-works contract ever negotiated in Pennsylvania. " The $250 million the township will collect during a 20-year period will not produce gift checks like those that Tullytown residents receive from a landfill there.
NEWS
October 25, 2005 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Decay does pay. Landfill gas, a combination of methane and carbon dioxide generated by tons of rotting garbage, is the hot darling in the world of alternative energy. Last week, the Chester County Solid Waste Authority officially joined the trend. Working in partnership with Michigan-based Granger Energy, the pair unveiled a state-of-the-art gas processing plant at the Lanchester Landfill. Estimated project costs are $12 million. "It has been a long struggle for the authority to get to this point," said authority chairman Robert J. Schoenberger, an expert in solid waste management and former Drexel University professor.
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