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BUSINESS
November 19, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Come Monday, it will be easier for consumers to "cut the cord" to their home telephone lines and go wireless: New federal rules will let phone customers for the first time switch their landline phone number to a cell phone. But analysts and phone companies say they are not anticipating any sudden, massive switch away from landline phones, even though cell phones - among other factors - have been cutting into the landline business for years. "We don't expect a lot of wireline to wireless porting," said Sharon Shaffer, a spokeswoman for Verizon Communications Inc., the nation's largest local-phone company.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2002 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of emergency 911 calls from wireless phones has exploded over the last decade, leaving local and state emergency-services agencies in a quandary over how to keep up with them all. The problem is cutting into the budgets of some Pennsylvania counties, largely because the state pays for its 911 call system with a surcharge on landline phones, whose growth has leveled off. There is no 911 surcharge on wireless phones in Pennsylvania, unlike...
NEWS
March 22, 2011
The New Jersey Senate has postponed a vote on a bill to deregulate cable television and telephone services. Consumer groups are against the bill, saying consumers would see rate increases for landline telephone and basic cable services. Verizon New Jersey and the cable industry support it. - AP
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2011
THE GIZMO: Cutting communications bills with the Ooma Telo and the C.Crane Super USB Wi-Fi Antenna. SLASH 'N' BURN: Are phone and Internet bills getting you down? Today we're looking at two great gadgets that can cut your monthly costs. How does "free" or "nearly free" sound? THE BEST HOME PHONE ALTERNATIVE: Lots of folks use the Internet to make calls without realizing it, having signed up for phone service from a cable/Internet service provider such as Comcast or Verizon FiOS.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having swiped millions of customers from telephone companies, Comcast Corp. says it plans to jazz up the boring-as-dirt home phone. Comcast's first enhancement to its phone service - which is being tested in the Coatesville area - pops the number of an incoming call onto PCs and TVs. It will be offered free to Comcast phone customers, beginning later this year. So behold couch potatoes, you no longer have to leap from comfy seats to check who's ringing. And, Dorothy, it gets better.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delaware County officials recently hired a consultant to help solve a vexing funding shortfall for the county's 911 center, they were not alone in their concern. Across Pennsylvania, local and state leaders are talking about changing the way county 911 operations are paid for. The primary source of revenue for the call centers are monthly fees charged per phone line. The bottom line, many county leaders and others say, is that those dollars are not keeping up with the cost of these ever more highly technological - not to mention expensive - systems.
NEWS
April 11, 2005
Touted housing plan not what Chinatown needs The April 5 article, "In shift, development may buoy Chinatown," heralds the development of new residences promoted by John Chin, executive director of the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp., as a positive development for Chinatown. The proposed development is nothing more than the ongoing gentrification of Chinatown, a 135-year-old community. The promise of affordable housing in 10 percent of the units is laughable since "affordable" has not been defined.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2009 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want to save on your monthly bills? Then you're a target customer for two of the newest combatants in the Philadelphia Phone Wars. After years of house-to-house combat between Verizon Communications and Comcast for landline customers, the region's air war has been heating up since the arrival in July of MetroPCS and in March of Cricket Wireless. Cricket and MetroPCS are second-tier wireless companies with their own networks and big aspirations: to lure an ever-larger subscriber base with their flat-fee, unlimited-talk-and-text business models and prices that start as low as $30 or $35 a month.
NEWS
February 11, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A telephone service that connects New Jersey callers who dial 211 to nonemergency health and social services will expand statewide today. The service is already available in Camden, Gloucester and Burlington Counties, though it is not universally recognized as the 911 emergency number is. The three-digit services are authorized by the Federal Communications Commission, but it is up to state and local governments to fund and implement the...
NEWS
May 25, 2015
ISSUE | PHONE MANNERS Tame robo-callsĀ at election time On the evening before the Pennsylvania primary, a string of robo-calls made a tough situation worse by peppering my landline with an irritating string of messages that tied up the phone. It's rude, but still possible, to hang up on a live telemarketer. However, it's not so easy to get a robo-caller off the line. Even when I hang up, the robocaller drones on. Fortunately, that night, my grown-up kid arrived safely on a flight that was an hour late, and he finally reached me on my landline.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 25, 2015
ISSUE | PHONE MANNERS Tame robo-callsĀ at election time On the evening before the Pennsylvania primary, a string of robo-calls made a tough situation worse by peppering my landline with an irritating string of messages that tied up the phone. It's rude, but still possible, to hang up on a live telemarketer. However, it's not so easy to get a robo-caller off the line. Even when I hang up, the robocaller drones on. Fortunately, that night, my grown-up kid arrived safely on a flight that was an hour late, and he finally reached me on my landline.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission moved Thursday to deregulate prices for Verizon's landline phone service in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and three other regions - a decision that could lead to sizable price jumps for customers, who pay about $22 a month for traditional local phone service. By a 3-2 vote that drew sharp dissents from the commission's two Democratic appointees, the PUC partly backed Verizon's October petition, which asked that its service be declared "competitive" in the five markets under a 2004 state law that sought to promote phone and Internet competition.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Verizon Communications Inc.'s $130 billion deal for the 45 percent of Verizon Wireless held by Vodafone has shed new light on the weak value Wall Street places on Verizon's legacy copper-line phone and FiOS TV and Internet businesses: about $20 billion to $30 billion. People are dropping traditional phone service for smartphones, and though FiOS has challenged Comcast Corp. and other cable-casters, Verizon found launching FiOS to be an expensive slog in the Philadelphia region and other metro areas.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Delaware County officials recently hired a consultant to help solve a vexing funding shortfall for the county's 911 center, they were not alone in their concern. Across Pennsylvania, local and state leaders are talking about changing the way county 911 operations are paid for. The primary source of revenue for the call centers are monthly fees charged per phone line. The bottom line, many county leaders and others say, is that those dollars are not keeping up with the cost of these ever more highly technological - not to mention expensive - systems.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | Jim Fitzgerald, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Striking Verizon landline workers say they laid the foundation for the company's booming wireless business and shouldn't be expected to give up contract benefits just because they work on a less profitable side of the business. But management says the company has to change to stay competitive and the 45,000 landline workers can't expect to be paid the way they were when the phone company was a monopoly. "It's no secret that the wireline business has experienced a 10-year decline in our customer base and in profitability," said CEO Lowell McAdam.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2011
THE GIZMO: Cutting communications bills with the Ooma Telo and the C.Crane Super USB Wi-Fi Antenna. SLASH 'N' BURN: Are phone and Internet bills getting you down? Today we're looking at two great gadgets that can cut your monthly costs. How does "free" or "nearly free" sound? THE BEST HOME PHONE ALTERNATIVE: Lots of folks use the Internet to make calls without realizing it, having signed up for phone service from a cable/Internet service provider such as Comcast or Verizon FiOS.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
The New Jersey Senate has postponed a vote on a bill to deregulate cable television and telephone services. Consumer groups are against the bill, saying consumers would see rate increases for landline telephone and basic cable services. Verizon New Jersey and the cable industry support it. - AP
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
Telephone calls touting the qualities of local politicians are part of the landscape this time of year. But these recorded phone messages - left on voice mails of residents of one Center City neighborhood recently - were different. "This is a call from your neighbor, Maryhelen," they said. "Her dog Ozzie went missing on Friday. " The calls offered a reward for Ozzie, a 3-pound, 4-year-old teacup Yorkshire terrier, and gave a phone number where Ozzie's owner, Maryhelen Kelley, could be reached.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2009 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want to save on your monthly bills? Then you're a target customer for two of the newest combatants in the Philadelphia Phone Wars. After years of house-to-house combat between Verizon Communications and Comcast for landline customers, the region's air war has been heating up since the arrival in July of MetroPCS and in March of Cricket Wireless. Cricket and MetroPCS are second-tier wireless companies with their own networks and big aspirations: to lure an ever-larger subscriber base with their flat-fee, unlimited-talk-and-text business models and prices that start as low as $30 or $35 a month.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having swiped millions of customers from telephone companies, Comcast Corp. says it plans to jazz up the boring-as-dirt home phone. Comcast's first enhancement to its phone service - which is being tested in the Coatesville area - pops the number of an incoming call onto PCs and TVs. It will be offered free to Comcast phone customers, beginning later this year. So behold couch potatoes, you no longer have to leap from comfy seats to check who's ringing. And, Dorothy, it gets better.
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