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NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Melinda Deanna Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
The Oaklands Corporate Center has moved a step closer to completion as the West Whiteland Board of Supervisors has approved plans for the development of an additional lot on the 270-acre site, located on Route 30 west of Whitford Road. James J. Gorman, the developer, told the board Monday that building on the lot would be similar to others on the site. But Gorman agreed that the landscaping planned for the area might present a problem. Landscaping plans presented previously to the board showed that some of the trees and shrubs planned for the site were close to telephone lines, but the board approved the plans for development of the new lot with the condition that the landscaping plans be approved by the township engineer.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsbury Board of Supervisors has approved amendments to its zoning ordinance regulating landscaping and screening for new developments. The move came at the Monday night meeting after the third public hearing on the series of amendments designed to cope with growth in the township. The supervisors also approved an amendment regulating exterior light fixtures. The board asked its attorney to redraft amendments regulating microwave satellite antennas and geothermal heat pumps and will vote on them at a regular meeting, board chairman Edward Wandersee said.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
Birmingham supervisors have allocated funds to spruce up the area around the Colonial-style township building on Route 926. At Monday night's meeting, they voted to spend $660 to finish the landscaping around the building and to use $890 per year from the capital- expense budget to maintain the grounds and plantings. The supervisors also approved a resolution accepting a deed of dedication for Heartease Drive in the 20-lot, 44-acre Heartease development on Wylie Road, west of Birmingham Road.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At Goshen Valley II condominiums they're going au naturel, at least when it comes to landscaping. As part of a summer-long experiment, the grounds around one building in the 192-unit complex will become completely pesticide-free, said landscaping contractor David Knight of Tops Tree Service Inc. "The only thing we will use on the turf is natural fertilizer," Knight said last week. . "We will monitor for weeds and insects, compile the data at the end of the season and see how it works.
REAL_ESTATE
October 10, 1997 | By Don Beideman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rosetree Crossing Apartments, Upper Providence Township, Delaware County. Mildred Fink had lived on the Main Line in a single family house for 28 years. When she sold it in a matter of days, she needed a place to live but hadn't thought about the Media area. "I had looked at a couple of apartments in the King of Prussia and Gulph Mills areas," said Fink, who has been a resident of Rosetree Crossing Apartments for five years. "One day I was passing by on Route 1 and saw this complex.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Township Council made it clear Monday night that it wants some landscaping to accompany a proposed $2.5 million technology classroom building on Pennsylvania State University's Delaware County campus. Jeff Hawver, architect for the project, told the council that the university planned to rely on existing landscaping and reseed the area disturbed by the construction. However, Township Engineer Arthur Rothe said the campus would lose 26 trees with the new building. The university plans to ask the council to rezone the land from residential to institutional.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
An urban planner has offered suggestions to lessen the impact of the Blue Route interchange on Lancaster Avenue near Route 320 and to spruce up other parts of Radnor Township. "Plant trees, columns of trees at the interchange and leading into Wayne," said Ronald Lee Fleming, president of Townscape Institute of Cambridge, Mass. "Combine landscape with public art. Have a planting program of color. " Fleming, also a designer, gave his views on enhancing the township, and in particular the downtown business district in Wayne, during a 40-minute slide program Monday night at the end of the commissioners' meeting.
REAL_ESTATE
March 29, 1998 | By Don Beideman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Kingswood Apartments, King of Prussia, Montgomery County There's a plaque on the wall of the leasing office of the Kingswood Apartments that commends the complex in King of Prussia for its attractive landscaping. The award is from the Upper Merion Township Shade Tree Commission. "We think landscaping is very important," said Michele El Assri, the manager for the 772-unit, 52-acre complex just off South Gulph Road. "It's important for the residents, as well as those who are driving by. "We like to have as much blooming color as we can. " According to El Assri, the complex has won a number of other awards, ranging from landscaping to overall maintenance from the Philadelphia Apartment Association.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Despite concern about maintaining a wooded setting, Whitpain Township Planning Commission has recommended approval of two office buildings for the Blue Bell Office Campus. Hansen Properties plans to build a twin-office building on a vacant 13-acre tract on its campus at Walton and Township Line Roads. The commission reviewed the plans Tuesday and voted 6-0 to recommend that the Zoning Hearing Board accept the plan, if the township planner and engineer approve the landscaping. The four-story buildings would have a total of 198,000 square feet and include a walkway to connect the structures.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
When Sewell landscaper Greg Deibert drove to Somerset County three weeks ago to buy a dwarf bonsai bougainvilla variegata for $200, he was entering Phase Two of his planning for next week's Philadelphia Flower Show. Phase Two consists of full-tilt, total obsession. Deibert says that most of his waking hours now are spent either working on or thinking about the exhibit that he will unveil to the public at the flower show's opening Sunday. Phase One for Deibert - the selection of a theme, the sorting of ideas and the preliminary planning - began last March.
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REAL_ESTATE
August 22, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Amit Azoulay is seated in the living room of a condo at 1512-18 Frankford Ave., explaining that, after completing 18 development projects, with four more on the horizon, he still considers himself an artist. "I have been painting all of my life," said Azoulay, who came to Philadelphia in 1999 from Haifa, Israel, to study at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Azoulay says his artistry is closer to architecture. "As a kid, I designed all kinds of buildings and 'dream houses,' " he said.
SPORTS
April 13, 2016 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
PHILADELPHIA lost its most influential sports figure in history with Monday's passing of Flyers co-founder and Comcast Spectacor creator Ed Snider at 83 after a long battle with bladder cancer. The icon was a sports "futurist" who played some kind of role in virtually every major sporting occurrence in Philadelphia over the past five decades. From his bringing the NHL to Philadelphia in 1967 with the expansion Flyers to the birth of the sports television and entertainment entity known as Spectacor in 1974 that grew into Comcast Spectacor to the opening of the state-of-the-art CoreStates Center (now Wells Fargo Center)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, FASHION COLUMNIST
Amanda Phelan is among the new breed of emerging designers who are quietly disruptive. For example, the 28-year-old Chadds Ford native sent a hypnotic women's wear collection - including a stunning mini-skirt, bandeau bra, and coat suit made from dichroic flowers - down her New York Fashion Week runway while an expressive, modern-dance routine was underway. "I want to create experiences for people that leave them tingling," Phelan told me recently at a Drexel University trunk show she hosted.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2015 | Ellen Gray
TRANSPARENT. Friday, Amazon. When "Transparent" premiered on Amazon last year, Caitlyn Jenner hadn't yet had her Vanity Fair closeup, and the story of 70-year-old Maura Pfefferman (Jeffrey Tambor) revealing herself, at last, to those who knew her only as Mort put the dysfunctional-family comedy in a class of its own.   As it returns on Friday for a second 10-episode season (the first episode is already available online), "Transparent" is still in a class of its own. But it's also just one of the shows - along with "I Am Cait," "I Am Jazz," "Becoming Us," and, of course, "Orange Is the New Black" - that have helped make 2015 the year in which TV turned its attention more fully to the T in LGBT.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With enough cameras trained on the Metropolitan Opera stage often enough, something historic is bound to be captured - and possibly was this month with the emotional uproar that greeted Dmitri Hvorostovsky's performance in Il Trovatore . It was the Oct. 3 opening of the Met's 10th season of HD simulcasts, which are seen in six Philadelphia-area cinemas. The celebrated Siberian baritone was returning after treatments for a brain tumor. Too professional to break character, he fought back a smile while the audience cheered his first entrance.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark M. Cordes, 59, of Drexel Hill, a landscape designer and community volunteer, died Friday, July 24, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Born in Elizabeth, N.J., and reared in Broomall, Mr. Cordes was the son of Ruth and George Cordes. He attended Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield, Delaware County, and Villanova University. A talented high school athlete, Mr. Cordes earned varsity letters in football, basketball, and baseball. He received many offers to play football at other schools, but chose Villanova, where he earned a bachelor's degree in marketing.
REAL_ESTATE
July 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The Counselors of Real Estate is a group of 1,000 individuals, invited to join, who are considered the crème de la crème of the industry. Over the last 26 years, the organization has provided considerable fodder for this column. Today's focuses on the top issues facing residential real estate in 2015-16, as seen by the group. I'm skipping over commercial real estate issues, unless they affect residential or result from housing shifts. First up: demographic shifts, with baby boomers and millennials having the greatest impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015
Q: Our neighbors just put in synthetic turf, and it looks really nice. Now, we want to do this to save ourselves from the maintenance on our traditional lawn. Plus, water restrictions mean we can't water anyway. Synthetic turf seems like such a good idea - are we missing something? - Ginny A: With all the concerns about water conservation these days, it makes a lot of sense to investigate alternatives to a thirsty lawn. I have synthetic turf in my backyard and love it. You don't need to mow, water, or fertilize it, which really makes life easier.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Actor Alan Rickman helms A Little Chaos , his second film as a director, with Kate Winslet as a royal landscaper helping to design the vast gardens of Versailles in the court of King Louis XIV (played by Rickman himself). Winslet's powerhouse performances holds up A Little Chaos , a movie that cannot necessarily support her inherent force. She plays Sabine de Barra, a fictional landscaper employed by André le Nôtre, mastermind behind Versailles' gardens. Matthias Schoenaerts, as le Nôtre, is getting mileage out of costume drama this summer: He also stars in the Thomas Hardy adaptation Far From the Madding Crowd . De Barra's life is not the only fudged part of history.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Domenic and Tommy are the closest thing to royalty at the Reading Terminal Market. Domenic M. Spataro, owner of Spataro's cheesesteaks. Tommy Nicolosi, owner of DiNic's Roast Pork & Beef. Some afternoons, the two old friends allow themselves a liquid lunch at the Terminal bar, Molly Malloy's. Who's going to tell them otherwise? Between them, they have about 85 years of experience at the Terminal. Domenic started working weekends and summers at his father's buttermilk stand when he was 8, then went full time the day after graduating from Northeast High.
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