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Landscaping

NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a chilly rain fell, Roger Winner stepped from his pickup and gloomily scanned the 16 acres of weed-choked fields that he had once nurtured. The land, adjacent to a solar farm in Burlington Township, must be allowed to return to its natural state to protect the habitat of endangered bog turtles under orders issued last year by the state Department of Environmental Protection. Winner had leased that land and a nearby parcel where he grows the high-grade rye that is turned into fluffy white bedding for thoroughbreds at the Parx and Saratoga Springs, N.Y., racetracks.
SPORTS
December 31, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
FOR THOSE who haven't been paying attention, the Big East is, well, different. Louisville, the defending national champion, is gone. Ditto Connecticut, which won the title in 2011. They're both in the American Athletic, with Temple, after the split with the football schools. Syracuse, which made the Final Four last March, is now in the ACC. As are Pittsburgh and Notre Dame. West Virginia, which got to a Final Four in 2010, already had left for the Big 12 before last season. Cincinnati, which made it to the Sweet 16 2 years ago, is also part of the AAC. So the Big East is no longer the best/deepest.
SPORTS
October 31, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com
IT IS WITH alarming - and depressing - frequency that we read or hear accounts of tragedies perpetrated by people who have been bullied as children. Happily, Marc Zumoff's story has had a much happier outcome. Tonight on Comcast SportsNet, Zumoff kicks off his 20th season as the 76ers' television play-by-play announcer - a run that puts him in the exalted company of such beloved "voices" as Harry Kalas, Richie Ashburn, Gene Hart and Merrill Reese. Oddly enough, his longtime success as a member of a such an exclusive fraternity might be a result of the torment he suffered at the hands of other kids.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The shifting landscape of American health care - for good or bad, depending on your opinion, status, employer, and particular changes - was evident Tuesday when one of the Philadelphia region's larger private employers, Johnson & Johnson, reported financial results for the third quarter of 2013. The health-care giant had increased sales and profits, but also greatly increased the money set aside to pay pending legal bills, and warned of possible layoffs in a local division because people are postponing elective surgery to repair knees, hips, and backs.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Laurie Olin says he really meant to retire two years ago. He even had notices sent out to announce he was handing the reins of his Philadelphia-based landscape architecture firm to his partners. But projects kept coming up that he couldn't resist. The grounds of the Barnes Foundation. The Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. Dilworth Plaza in front of City Hall. So, at 75, Olin is as peripatetic as ever, jetting off to Europe and the West Coast to see clients. On Wednesday, though, he'll take a break from long-haul travels to meet President Obama and receive the National Medal of Arts, in recognition of his lifelong crusade to create tranquil oases that make cities more livable.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Dancer and choreographer Joan Myers Brown, the founder of Philadanco and a commanding presence in the world of dance and arts education, and Laurie Olin, whose landscape-architecture firm is responsible for revitalizing the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and many other public spaces in the city, have been named recipients of the National Medal of the Arts, the White House announced Wednesday. In announcing the 12 winners of the nation's highest civic honor for excellence in the arts, President Obama cited Brown, 80, for carving out "an artistic haven for African American dancers and choreographers to innovate, create, and share their unique visions with the national and global dance communities.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia landscapers were taken to a hospital on Sunday night after they were discovered at the bottom of a private pool in Haverford Township. Resident of the home at 800 block of Buck Lane told police they gave the gardeners permission to use the backyard pool when they finished working. Just after 8 p.m. the two were discovered in the 14-foot-deep pool. The homeowners pulled the two men from the water. The unidentified men, ages 39 and 44, were taken to Bryn Mawr Hospital by ambulance.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Joe Fichetola saw what was coming, evergreens first. "They still almost looked alive in February," says the owner of Joe's Garden Center in Atlantic County. "With spring, they're coming out of dormancy and turning brown. " Adds longtime employee Joanne Chambers: "Now everybody in Brigantine wants shrubs. The ones they had, even the ones that tolerate salt water, got saturated. " As the first post-Sandy growing season starts, folks in and around Brigantine and Atlantic City - where ocean and bay floodwaters were the primary aftermath of the hurricane - are noticing which trees, bushes, flowers, and grasses appear to have survived.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
First in an occasional series. Mayor Nutter's property tax reform has been packaged as the fix for a badly broken and unfair system of assessments, but a powerful undercurrent has also driven the long and difficult effort. Its most ardent advocates believe the Actual Value Initiative (AVI) will allow the city to finally right its notoriously business-hostile tax landscape, often blamed for Philadelphia's lagging behind other big cities in important economic categories. Advocates for a modern property tax system have been arguing for years that the city taxes the wrong things - businesses and wages.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Troy Graham and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The politicians and analysts have been talking for more than a year about the potential winners and losers from Mayor Nutter's property tax reform, and now the lines have been drawn. The results of a citywide reassessment key to Nutter's Actual Value Initiative (AVI) were released Friday, and the data confirm some long-held expectations - wealthier, fast-changing neighborhoods are facing stiff increases, and many large commercial properties will see big drops in their bills. Some hikes are jaw-dropping.
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