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BUSINESS
April 16, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dan Mitchell has borrowed $3 million in the last year and a half to buy real estate and equipment to expand his brewery, Ithaca Beer Co. It wasn't easy. Mitchell went to at least four banks in Ithaca, N.Y., looking for a loan to buy real estate and equipment. His sales were growing 25 percent a year and the company had become profitable. His distributors wanted to buy more beer from him. But most of the loan officers just handed him applications and told him to send them in. Even a bank that had already loaned Mitchell money wasn't interested.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The photographer Emmet Gowin is justifiably well known for the remarkably frank, and simultaneously mysterious, portraits he took of his wife, Edith Morris, and their family in the 1960s and '70s. His aerial photographs of landscapes ravaged by strip mining and weapons testing, taken over the next two decades, offer a similarly matter-of-fact yet ambiguous view of their subjects, but from a distance. Over the last decade, Gowin has gotten up close and personal again, photographing various species of moths in Panama and South America alone, during the day, and as they flit around Edith at night, creating ribbons of light in the dark.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Pentimenti Gallery regular Steven Baris continues to study and interpret the elasticity and ambiguity of the exurban landscape and its big-box architecture in his recent geometric paintings on canvas and Mylar, and his painted Plexiglas wall sculptures. In particular, his large oil paintings on canvas, showing diagrammatic outlines floating in milky atmospheres, express the banality and soullessness of the exurbs. Baris also has created an installation for the gallery's Project Room, "Exurban Archipelago," that includes a video of a distribution center that appears to have been shot by Baris through the windows of a moving car; it captures the facility's anonymous contours to a T. Baris' work is nicely complemented by Kim Beck's large graphite drawings, in which she reorganizes the typical suburban and exurban landscape into complex compositions with cutouts.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
As anyone with a laptop or cellphone knows, battery life has made great strides over the years, but has plenty of room for improvement. That's one of the goals behind some new research at Drexel University, where engineers have developed a new class of materials that take the form of whisper-thin "nanosheets. " The team recently reported that these layers - so thin that it would take thousands of them to match the thickness of a human hair - could be used to store a charge in a lithium-ion battery.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
Pop quiz! Identify these political heavy hitters: Edward Conrad, Robert Mercer, John Paulson, Bob Perry, Julian Robertson, Paul Singer, Sheldon Adelson. Give up? They're very rich people who have inaugurated a brand new era of politics in America, the Daddy Warbucks era. Their lavish donations have been directly responsible for the unprecedented glut of toxic TV attack ads that have debased the Republican presidential race, most recently in Florida. The first six donors (all of whom are investment bankers and hedge fund executives, with the exception of home builder Perry)
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The characterization of a codefendant - as a lovesick pup or a mad-dog killer - loomed large during opening statements in the Chester County homicide trial of Morgan M. Mengel on Tuesday. The 36-year-old mother of three is accused of conspiring with her codefendant, Stephen M. Shappell, 22, to poison and fatally beat her husband, Kevin Mengel, 33, at the landscaping business the Mengels ran in West Goshen Township. When the toxin - an Internet recipe for liquid nicotine that was mixed with lemon Snapple - did not work fast enough, Shappell bludgeoned Kevin Mengel to death, striking him so hard that he broke a shovel, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Learning to See," Nancy Hellebrand's photo exhibition at the James A. Michener Art Museum, sets forth changing assumptions about American landscape photography - not for her just another traditional view of the natural world. To accomplish her impressive aim - learning a new way of seeing and presenting landscape simply, in a series of large-scale color photos - is perhaps beyond anyone's ability. Yet taken as a kind of shorthand, the display by this Philadelphia-born photographer, who has been exhibiting internationally since 1973 and working in color digital photography since the 1990s, is both instructive and pleasurable.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward V. Lis, 96, of Gulph Mills, an artist who learned to paint as a prisoner of war in World War II, died on Thursday, Dec. 29, at home. Mr. Lis painted portraits of many prominent people, including Cardinal John Krol and several presidents of the Union League of Philadelphia. The Navy commissioned a painting of the aircraft carrier Saratoga from him. As a landscape artist, he worked in oils and watercolors, painting scenes in Maine and Colorado, as well as in Cape May, the Poconos, and Conshohocken, where one critic admired how he captured the "sun glow" on the facades of rowhouses.
TRAVEL
December 25, 2011 | By Luaine Lee, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
BUDAPEST, Hungary - There's an easier way to see Europe than being crammed into tour buses or crowded hostels. A river cruise is one of the most relaxing and picturesque ways to view the wonders of the Continent up close. While many cruise operators prowl the waterways, one of the most comprehensive is Viking River Cruises, which boasts 19 ships (six more next year) and explores most of the navigable rivers in Europe, plus parts of Asia and Africa. Of these, the eight-day Danube cruise embarks in the historic city of Budapest and weaves its way slowly down the green margins of the Danube, through flamboyant Vienna; fairy-tale towns such as Germany's Regensburg; the lush vineyards of Austria; and, finally, Hitler's favorite city, Nuremberg.
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