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NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Joel Greenberg, Washington Post
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu emerged weakened and facing a redrawn political map Tuesday after Israeli television projections showed a surge for a new centrist party, Yesh Atid, in Israel's elections, making it a key element of a future coalition. Netanyahu's ticket combining his rightist Likud party with the ultranationalist Yisrael Beiteinu faction won 31 parliamentary seats, according to the projections, a sharp decline from the combined 42 seats held by the two parties in the outgoing 120-member legislature.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Approaching the Walt Whitman Bridge on the way to South Jersey, there's an ad for a website that seems so Philly. Next to a giant unhappy face, these words: NastyClient.com. Leave it to an incensed landscaper to create a digital place for contractors to dish about the customers who chiseled them. One morning before sunrise in March, Matt Stachel of Feasterville strapped his cloth sign to an empty spot on a fence that faced outbound traffic, and since then, his website has become a gathering place for the aggrieved.
SPORTS
December 14, 2012
THE SEVEN Big East schools that don't play Division I football are planning to leave the conference. If this news takes anyone by surprise then you just haven't been monitoring all this realignment business very stringently. More than a few folks saw this move as being pretty much inevitable, once the Big East started coming apart last year because of mass money-based football defections. The tipping point apparently was the recent addition of Tulane (Tulane?) as a replacement for Louisville.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
William Trost Richards, a Philadelphia landscape painter of some renown during the late 19th century, enjoyed a working situation that few artists today are lucky enough to fall into. A wealthy patron, Philadelphia industrialist and art collector George Whitney, not only subsidized Richards and bought dozens of his oils and watercolors, but he also promoted the work among other collectors. The two were friends who corresponded regularly for about 10 years when Richards was out of the city.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the last time Barack Obama had to face a Republican opponent in Pennsylvania, the political battleground of the nation's sixth-largest state has changed a bit. Unemployment is up; jobs are down. The voting-age population may be slightly older, with more baby boomers in or near retirement. And Republicans have slightly narrowed the Democrats' voter-registration advantage. Some of the changes are subtle, and they don't all favor one party or the other. Analysts said it was hard to predict how they could affect the Nov. 6 election.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
A report on private-sector jobs in the region finds that Philadelphians are fleeing the city at an alarming rate. Fortunately, they come back every night - for now. The daily out-migration of nearly 191,000 people to jobs in the suburbs and New Jersey outlined in the new Center City District (CCD) review is a stark reminder that there simply aren't nearly enough jobs in the city. Indeed, the decades-long downward trend in the private-sector workforce that provides 84 percent of city jobs shows no sign of leveling off. Another double-digit decline is possible by 2020, the business-funded group notes in its report released Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns and Inquirer Music Critic
Journalists are supposed to be the ultimate Zeligs: We pop up at the right places with faces hidden by the shoulders and hairdos of the famous and powerful. We observe and report, always in the thick of things but never part of them. Journalists aren't usually role models or public figures, aren't elected officials, and don't receive taxpayer money. Who cares which ones are gay? But Anderson Cooper, 45, the CNN star journalist who yesterday came out as a gay man (to nobody's surprise)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Mid-May brought artists from 17 states to participate in Wayne Art Center's Sixth Annual Plein Air Festival. Most of the 23 artists accepted for this increasingly competitive event came from a distance and were guests of local families while painting landscapes in and around Wayne for five festival days. The weather cooperated, and the art center hung the work as fast as it came in - hundreds of paintings, all for sale. Shelby Keefe, a full-time artist from Milwaukee, deservedly won two awards, best in show and Plein Air Magazine's prize, for an oil landscape portraying Ithan and one of Center City, respectively.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Chris Lafakis
The development of Canada's tar sands and North Dakota's Bakken oil shale region have profoundly transformed the U.S. energy landscape. U.S. and Canadian oil production has risen 11 percent since 2010 and could rise by as much as 50 percent over the next decade. More plentiful North American supply has lowered costs for some U.S. refineries, but mainly in places such as Oklahoma and Illinois, where it can be shipped via the Keystone pipeline. But there are no pipelines to carry this oil to the U.S. coastal refining hubs.
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