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Langhorne Manor

NEWS
December 17, 1992 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While most people are hanging up their stockings this Christmas, Police Chief William Schramm will be hanging up his badge and gun. After nearly 40 years of police work, Schramm, 75, is retiring as chief of tiny Langhorne Manor Borough. The job, which he has held for the last 17 years, is just one of many that he has held in five police departments in Bucks County. He started in police work in 1952 as police chief of Bensalem Township when that area, he said, "wasn't much more than five pig farms.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Formal speed checks, initiated this year after the borough bought a second patrol car, resulted last month in 128 citations and more than $2,000in fines. At a Borough Council meeting Tuesday, Mayor Frank Thompson reported on the police department, which employs six part-time officers to serve the community of 800 residents, and released speed-check statistics. He and others have maintained that the purpose of cracking down on speeders has been to increase safety along 4.5 miles of roads in the borough - not to make money.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By Nancy Pasternack, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After four years of complaining to the council about his flooding problems and saying that a faulty drainage system installed in 1989 was to blame, Leo Beloyan took matters into his own hands and poured 20 wheelbarrows of concrete into a storm drain in August. He said the concrete stopped the flooding in and around his home. But the council wants the concrete removed, and is considering an overhaul of the drainage system. The hangup now seems to be the $55,800 price tag submitted by the borough's engineer - the same firm that designed the drainage system.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | By Michael A. Renshaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The state has given the green light to a Langhorne Manor Borough plan to hang blinking warning lights over the intersection of Bellevue Avenue (Route 413) and Highland Avenue, but it has no funding for the project. The intersection is one of the most dangerous in Lower Bucks. "It's amazing that PennDot doesn't have the money it would cost for a used car for this project," said Al Cote, the councilman who came up with the idea for the lights. According to Cote, the plan calls for installing blinking red lights on Highland and on both northbound and southbound Bellevue.
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The candidate field is the only thing that is crowded in Langhorne Manor Borough, which is home to about 250 families. Eight Republicans are competing in Tuesday's primary for four seats on the Borough Council. Republicans outnumber Democrats by a 4-1 ratio in this almost completely residential borough. Two Democratic candidates - Planning Commission member Jane Boyle and political newcomer Nancy McFadden - are shoo-ins for the primary, and will face competition in the November election.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | By Nancy Pasternack, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In this borough of 800, everybody wants to get into the act. Some nearby boroughs have had difficulty finding enough candidates to run for council seats. Here, six candidates were winnowed from a field of 10 who ran in the May primary. They are vying in Tuesday's general election for four council seats. Borough officials say Langhorne Manor was once pretty quiet. But a three-year controversy over an expensive sewer project has sparked residents to get politically involved.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents who live next to a construction site of borough building inspector Joseph A. Bush Jr. want him to do as he tells others to do. They say they are frustrated with stagnant pools of water on the Hulmeville Avenue property and rodents they say have moved into their neighborhood because of a project being completed by Bush and his family. "The mice problem sparked me," said Donna Cianci, who lives next to the site where mounds of dirt and building debris sit. Her family has gone so far as to buy Tigger, their second gray tabby, to help take care of rodents.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The boroughs of Hulmeville and Langhorne Manor are similar in size and population - each has less than 1,000 residents living on less than a square mile of land. But while Langhorne Manor has 10 candidates vying for four four-year council seats and three candidates hoping to be elected mayor for a four-year term in the May 18 primary, no one in Hulmeville is running for mayor and only three candidates have signed up to run for four open seats on council. Is it something in Langhorne Manor's water that has spurred this political interest?
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
The Langhorne Manor Council has voted unanimously to hire real estate appraiser George D. Sengpiel of neighboring Langhorne Borough to assess each of the 51 private properties where sewer lines will be laid. Sengpiel, who will be paid $85 an hour, will help determine how much the homeowners should be paid for the right-of-way to bury sewers pipes on their lots. Test drilling for the multimillion-dollar sewer project may begin by the end of the month, Langhorne Manor Borough President Paul Cichy told the council.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Construction plans for Langhorne Manor's sewers were submitted Tuesday night to the Borough Council by project engineer John Swenson of Carroll Engineering in Bensalem. Langhorne Manor will receive $3.9 million in grants and loans from Pennvest, a state assistance fund for capital improvement projects, to build a badly needed public sewer system. Swenson's plans will lay sewer pipes for all 285 of Langhorne Manor's houses and will install two pumping stations to help sewage flow negotiate the borough's hilly terrain.
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