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NEWS
June 14, 2006
AFTER reading your article "Free Speech at Steak," and having heard what Mr. Vento had to say about his controversial sign, I wanted to throw in my two cents' worth. In a KYW radio soundbite, I heard Mr. Vento say something to the effect that the signs shouldn't bother non-English-speaking folks because they wouldn't be able to read it. So what's the point in posting it? Is there some sort of subliminal suggestion here? In your article, mention is made of his grandparents' having been Italian immigrants.
NEWS
February 26, 2012
David Woods is a Philadelphia writer When the body of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is brought before the Romans, does the bard have them say, "Who dunnit?" No, he has Mark Antony deliver the eloquent "Friends, Romans, Countrymen" speech. And the Roman poet Horace showed his lyrical skill with: "Pick today's fruits, not relying on the future in the slightest. " Carpe Diem . He did not, you will note, say, "Have a nice day. " In both cases, the writers knew a simple truth: that language matters.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jonathan Wilson
The Philadelphia Civic Ballet performed yesterday at Bishop Shanahan High School in Downingtown. The troupe has danced at area schools for 28 years.
NEWS
August 3, 1986
Olney residents have further marred the reputation of Philadelphia. Their actions against the Olney Korean community are deplorable, born of fear and ignorance. Language has never caused division in this country. Social and economic incentives to learn English have lured every immigrant community, without exception. The adoption of English by immigrants follows a documented pattern: the first generation tends to be comfortable only in its mother tongue, the second generation is bilingual, and the third generation tends to speak only English.
NEWS
January 21, 2008
ON JAN. 3, when the Catholic calendar honors the Feast of the Holy Name, I reflected on a recent experience I had in a market parking lot. A young mother and her daughter, about 6, came to their car next to mine. The daughter climbed into the car first, then the mother. The mother screamed at the child, "J---- C-----, why did you move my [bleeping] seat!" I turned and asked her if that was appropriate language to use with a child. She turned on me with a blast of expletives. The abusive use of the name of Jesus is ubiquitous.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | By David Dante Troutt
The Oakland, Calif., School District has reminded the nation of what language means to us. It is our very beginning. Once we as toddlers are given the gift of the communicating self, we can forever discover, learn and expand in a world of common symbols. Perhaps nothing defines us more than our linguistic skills; nothing determines as much about where we can and cannot go. How we talk may be the first - and last - clue about our intelligence and whether we're trusted or feared, heard or ignored, admitted or excluded.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"It's not the past that makes us. It's the image of the past contained in language. " That pronouncement from Brian Friel's Translations focuses on the play's major theme: language, its power and limitations, uses and abuses. And if the last words were modified to read "a colorful image of the past contained in vividly expressed language," it would pretty much describe the play Temple Theaters is presenting. Translations' thoughtful ruminations are placed within the context of the Irish Troubles, but it was not the more familiar locales - say, Dublin in 1916 or the Ulster of the last three decades - that interested Friel in this 1980 play.
NEWS
April 30, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although the new Westampton Township police contract is a month overdue, officials of both the township and the police association say there is neither a stalemate nor an impasse. Rather, with all the main issues decided, the hang-up to a new agreement is language, they say. "Right now, our lawyer's got it again, and he's got to change some of the language in it," police association president Steven Van Sciver said on Monday. "I'm hoping to have it at the end of this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
We think of language as being primarily a means of communication, yet it makes possible other fundamental activities, such as remembering. It creates the interior voice of self-consciousness. And language can also be a weapon that produces negative effects, such as confusion and boredom. The five artists in "Plural Speech," an exhibition at White Box Gallery, examine various modalities of language, and through their work make concrete different attitudes toward it. For example, James Elaine sees language as a natural force.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
May 1, 2016
Answer: French and Haitian Creole. Virtually all of the country's residents speak Haitian Creole, which was named an official language in the 1980s.
SPORTS
April 9, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
CINCINNATI - Emmanuel Burriss pulled a chair up to Cesar Hernandez' locker on Thursday morning before the series finale at Great American Ball Park. The Phillies teammates chatted for a few minutes in Spanish, the native tongue of Hernandez and the language that Burriss works to master. Burriss, who grew up in Washington, did not start learning Spanish until he was 14. His first words came via family members from the Dominican Republic. He took some courses in high school and college, but most of his study came outside the classroom.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
This year's fierce battle for the presidency is mostly being waged with words a middle-schooler could understand. At least one current candidate - guess which one? - lands at an even lower schooling level when it comes to sentence structure, but he still fares better than one of our former presidents, according to a new analysis of candidate speeches conducted at Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute. Maxine Eskenazi, the institute's principal scientist, and Elliot Schumacher, a graduate student, performed a "readability analysis" of multiple speeches by five candidates - Ted Cruz, Hillary Clinton, Marco Rubio, Bernie Sanders, and Donald Trump - as well as single speeches by four former presidents and President Obama.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
I'm thinking of rejoining the Republican Party. It's not exactly a homecoming worthy of celebration, but more like joining a run-down country club just to throw out the golf pro. I can't stand the thought of sitting out the April 26 Pennsylvania Republican primary. There was a time when I was proud to be a card-carrying member. After following my parents into the GOP when I turned 18, I vividly recall both my enthusiasm and difficulty deciding when casting my first presidential ballot in the spring of 1980: Ronald Reagan or George H.W. Bush?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2016
DEAR ABBY: A foreign friend used the N word while commenting about an employee at a hotel we were staying in. After he said it a second time, I slapped him and told him that word was never acceptable, regardless of the reason. I feel bad about hitting him, but entirely justified in motive and intent. I really can't think of another, more effective way of registering how offended I am in a situation like this. Should I apologize? Should it be a qualified apology? I tried to explain the complex racial history of the U.S. and why the word was so hurtful, but he seemed disinclined to understand.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Perhaps the most heartbreaking element of The Language Archive , Julia Cho's gentle drama about love and linguistics, rests in its frequent references to Esperanto. In Bristol Riverside Theatre's production, linguist George (Irungu Mutu), his unhappy wife Mary (Julianna Zinkel), and besotted assistant Emma (Tiffany Villarin) move among rafters-high bookshelves filled with file folders containing the last recorded remnants of hundreds of dead languages. And yet, George and Emma, who can't even code-break human bonding in their mother tongues, study plucky Esperanto, a vocabulary invented for the purpose of bringing people together.
NEWS
December 9, 2015
IN HER RECENT column, Christine Flowers writes, "I reject the premise that language, even harsh language, can trigger havoc. Words don't kill. Sick, evil people do. " Therefore, she claims, the inflammatory language of the anti-abortion movement has nothing to do with the violent attacks against abortion providers. Ms. Flowers also indicates that she is an "unapologetic Christian. " She should remember, then, the flyers that were circulated in El Salvador in the '70s and '80s instructing soldiers to "Be a patriot!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Here's the thing about David Ives' All in the Timing : You won't think it's Hamlet . But you're not a chimp, either. However, to understand that joke, you'll have to see the Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium's staging of Ives' six short plays, each a thinking person's comedy that abounds in the absurdity of language and that is articulated and captured by this fantastic little production. The Hamlet joke refers to Words, Words, Words, Ives' take on a theorem (strangely enough, first postulated by Aristotle)
NEWS
October 28, 2015
WORDS HAVE POWER to make you believe, but also to deceive. In 1984 , his brilliant "Big Brother" novel (that in some ways has achieved reality), George Orwell invented Newspeak, a language in which words don't mean what they say. In real life, Orwell fought against opaque, meaningless words he thought discouraged clear thought. If you are pushing your point of view, you want it to sound smart and nice. You want the other guy's position to seem dumb and nasty. That's why abortion activists on both sides frame their positions as being positive: " pro -choice" or " pro -life.
SPORTS
October 16, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
EVGENY MEDVEDEV walks confidently into an office on the second floor of the Flyers' practice facility in Voorhees, N.J., carrying a smoothie in his right hand. His left wrist sports a bright silver, yet understated, watch. He's wearing a black V-neck T-shirt and jeans. The Flyers had an optional skate on this morning. Medvedev wasn't on the ice but he did work out. His day isn't done, though. He's in this office to work, too. He walks in with a smile and says to the people in the room: "Hello.
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