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NEWS
June 14, 2006
AFTER reading your article "Free Speech at Steak," and having heard what Mr. Vento had to say about his controversial sign, I wanted to throw in my two cents' worth. In a KYW radio soundbite, I heard Mr. Vento say something to the effect that the signs shouldn't bother non-English-speaking folks because they wouldn't be able to read it. So what's the point in posting it? Is there some sort of subliminal suggestion here? In your article, mention is made of his grandparents' having been Italian immigrants.
NEWS
February 26, 2012
David Woods is a Philadelphia writer When the body of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is brought before the Romans, does the bard have them say, "Who dunnit?" No, he has Mark Antony deliver the eloquent "Friends, Romans, Countrymen" speech. And the Roman poet Horace showed his lyrical skill with: "Pick today's fruits, not relying on the future in the slightest. " Carpe Diem . He did not, you will note, say, "Have a nice day. " In both cases, the writers knew a simple truth: that language matters.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jonathan Wilson
The Philadelphia Civic Ballet performed yesterday at Bishop Shanahan High School in Downingtown. The troupe has danced at area schools for 28 years.
NEWS
August 3, 1986
Olney residents have further marred the reputation of Philadelphia. Their actions against the Olney Korean community are deplorable, born of fear and ignorance. Language has never caused division in this country. Social and economic incentives to learn English have lured every immigrant community, without exception. The adoption of English by immigrants follows a documented pattern: the first generation tends to be comfortable only in its mother tongue, the second generation is bilingual, and the third generation tends to speak only English.
NEWS
January 21, 2008
ON JAN. 3, when the Catholic calendar honors the Feast of the Holy Name, I reflected on a recent experience I had in a market parking lot. A young mother and her daughter, about 6, came to their car next to mine. The daughter climbed into the car first, then the mother. The mother screamed at the child, "J---- C-----, why did you move my [bleeping] seat!" I turned and asked her if that was appropriate language to use with a child. She turned on me with a blast of expletives. The abusive use of the name of Jesus is ubiquitous.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | By David Dante Troutt
The Oakland, Calif., School District has reminded the nation of what language means to us. It is our very beginning. Once we as toddlers are given the gift of the communicating self, we can forever discover, learn and expand in a world of common symbols. Perhaps nothing defines us more than our linguistic skills; nothing determines as much about where we can and cannot go. How we talk may be the first - and last - clue about our intelligence and whether we're trusted or feared, heard or ignored, admitted or excluded.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"It's not the past that makes us. It's the image of the past contained in language. " That pronouncement from Brian Friel's Translations focuses on the play's major theme: language, its power and limitations, uses and abuses. And if the last words were modified to read "a colorful image of the past contained in vividly expressed language," it would pretty much describe the play Temple Theaters is presenting. Translations' thoughtful ruminations are placed within the context of the Irish Troubles, but it was not the more familiar locales - say, Dublin in 1916 or the Ulster of the last three decades - that interested Friel in this 1980 play.
NEWS
April 30, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although the new Westampton Township police contract is a month overdue, officials of both the township and the police association say there is neither a stalemate nor an impasse. Rather, with all the main issues decided, the hang-up to a new agreement is language, they say. "Right now, our lawyer's got it again, and he's got to change some of the language in it," police association president Steven Van Sciver said on Monday. "I'm hoping to have it at the end of this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
We think of language as being primarily a means of communication, yet it makes possible other fundamental activities, such as remembering. It creates the interior voice of self-consciousness. And language can also be a weapon that produces negative effects, such as confusion and boredom. The five artists in "Plural Speech," an exhibition at White Box Gallery, examine various modalities of language, and through their work make concrete different attitudes toward it. For example, James Elaine sees language as a natural force.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Voters will weigh in on four ballot questions Tuesday that would change Philadelphia's Home Rule Charter, the city's governing document. Two pertain to education: one to abolish the School Reform Commission and another to explore offering universal prekindergarten. A third would create a commission to study the advancement of women, while the fourth would require city offices to plan for providing access to non-English speakers. History shows that the questions have a good chance of passing.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
OF ALL THE SINS that go down in Atlantic City, skipping Sunday Mass isn't one among devout Catholics. Even for casino gamblers, "vacations are not a vacation from church," says Father Joe Pham, pastor of Our Lady Star of the Sea, on Atlantic Avenue. It's not about praying for luck, he says. "It's for their faith. They fulfill their obligation to God. " Pham's church celebrates 10 weekend Masses, in three languages: six in English, three in Spanish (led by his assistant priest, Father Jaime Hostios, who's from Columbia)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Laurie Anderson - calling from the Philharmonie de Paris, scoping it out for a show - is balancing many things. That balancing act will be on display in her Language of the Future show at Princeton's McCarter Theatre on Friday evening. Everything this pioneering performance artist/electronic music composer does is about the next thing, something in the future. "I don't think I'll ever have a message, or a philosophy," Anderson said. "I don't want to telegraph anything coded. " Her debut directorial full-length film, Heart of a Dog , commissioned by the Franco-German TV network Arte, was supposed to be about a philosophy of life - "until I told them that I didn't have one, repeatedly," she said, laughing.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anita Magistro Udell's father was a North Jersey shoemaker from a small Sicilian town. Sicilian was the language at home, and so "she did not speak English until elementary school," daughter Ruth Kunstadter said. But soon, still in elementary school, she was commuting from her East Orange home for piano lessons in Greenwich Village. Living in three languages - and music is certainly a language - might have seemed quite natural for the youngster. On Wednesday, Feb. 18, Mrs. Udell, 93, foreign languages department chair during a 34-year teaching career at what is now Arcadia University in Glenside, died at the Rydal Park retirement community in Rydal.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
REDONDO BEACH, Calif. - For the second year in a row, I said goodbye to the gray skies of New Jersey and flew to California to visit family for the holidays. It's a beautiful place, full of warmth and sunshine and palm trees. I tried to relax into a Southern California beach lifestyle where so many people drive expensive cars but work hard at looking artfully sloppy in thousands of dollars of clothes. But I couldn't shake the feeling that I didn't quite fit in. I was always a half-beat behind while the band roared on. Except when running.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One woman has devoted her career to understanding the brain of an animal that measures just 1 millimeter in length. Another explores the brains of creatures with billions of neurons, whose ability with languages sets them apart from all other living things. The two will have the chance for a pretty interesting conversation in April. Cornelia Bargmann, who studies the brain of a type of roundworm, and Elissa Newport, a prominent expert on how humans learn language, are among nine new winners of awards from the Franklin Institute, given each year to recognize achievement in the sciences and engineering.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
An assembly of Roman Catholic bishops gathered to consider new ways their church might minister to families in the 21st century has backed away from the unprecedented message of welcome to homosexuals it had issued early last week. In the final report issued Saturday, the 183 bishops gathered in Rome discarded a statement from an interim document Monday that had declared that "homosexuals have gifts and qualities to offer to the Christian community. " Similarly, a section in Monday's document titled "Welcoming Homosexual Persons," was replaced in the final document with a title reading, "The Pastoral Care of Persons With Homosexual Orientation.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Linz was being interviewed two weeks ago by a teacher, a few days before preschool graduation. Call it an exit interview. "How old are you?" asked Sherri Fickenscher. "Six," Teddy said. "Siiiiix," he repeated, slumping his shoulders, slowing his voice. "I'm soooo ooold," he continued, and fell from his chair pretending to be dead. What is remarkable about this moment is that Teddy is profoundly deaf, meaning that he was born unable to hear anything. He has been taught to listen and speak so well that he will start mainstream kindergarten at the private Haverford School next month.
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
For someone famous for sharing his depression with the world, Eric Jarosinski is in an extremely good mood. It is 10:30 a.m. on a sunny morning in Philadelphia, and Jarosinski is late but content. "Sorry," he says. "The bus. " He settles into his seat at the Melrose Diner, and orders coffee and an omelet with cheddar cheese and extra peppers. He will hardly touch his food over the next two hours. Instead, he talks a lot, laughs even. That might surprise the 85,000 people who follow him on Twitter.
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