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Language Barrier

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NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The foreign language evaluation committee has blasted the Wallingford- Swarthmore school board for ignoring its suggestions for improvements to the district's foreign language program. Committee Chairwoman Radmila Vuchic and several language committee members were at the board's meeting Monday to voice their objection to the district's elimination of sixth-grade German classes and reduction of the foreign language faculty by 1.5 positions. "Specifically, we regret that German is to be cut from the sixth-grade exploratory program," Vuchic said.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
Lisa Kinoshita, a junior chemistry major at Haverford College, studied Japanese for three years at Maui High School in her home state of Hawaii. Now she is enrolled in an intermediate Japanese course at Haverford. She said she might return to work in Hawaii, the state with the largest proportion of Japanese-Americans and a hot spot for tourists from Japan. "They just spend so much money there," she said. Allan Chase, a sophomore who is in the Navy ROTC program at Villanova, said that studying Japanese was a career move.
NEWS
March 27, 1995 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There's so much Carlos Garcia wants to say. He would like to talk in depth about the poverty he faced growing up in the Dominican Republic; the gut-wrenching decision to leave his family and move in with his uncle in Phoenixville in the summer of 1993; how hard it has been to adapt to a new country, a new school and a new language; and his emergence as one of this country's top high school sprinters. But he can't. At least not in English. "It's very frustrating," Garcia said.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | By Jean Francis FOR THE INQUIRER
When I failed French in high school, I believed I'd never be able to master a foreign language. That's why I steered clear of language courses in college. And that's also why whenever I traveled abroad, I vacationed in England, Ireland and Australia. The English-speaking countries. Last year, though, my husband spent the summer working in Germany, and my 10-year-old son and I were invited to join him for part of the time. I had less than two weeks to get ready. Hardly enough time to master the gender of German nouns.
SPORTS
March 30, 2012 | By Kerith Gabriel
DANNY MWANGA is trying his utmost to become a chameleon. Adapt, adapt . . . adapt. He conveyed this while speaking with me on Wednesday. He also said - in confidence - he knows his play is not up to the level fans expect. But he's healthy, showing no ill effects from last season's debilitating shoulder and hip injuries. He's happy too, entrusted with being the team's top striker alongside newcomer Lionard Pajoy. But here's the issue. Mwanga, with Pajoy as his third strike partner in as many seasons, has remained the only constant.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | By Douglas Pike, Inquirer Editorial Board
Washington hums at summit time. People in a dither up and down Pennsylvania Avenue. Our allies' ambassadors looking on hopefully but edgily. A pact hailed not for how much it cuts, but for the wondrous fact that it turns us in the right direction. I refer, of course, to the recent summit between President Reagan and Congress on slowing the debt race. Why did their deficit diplomacy, which involved so much imagination, fail to capture other people's imagination? Chances are, the language barrier kept millions of English-speaking Americans from appreciating the budget summit.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | By Lisa Pupo
Belts had been loosened and buttons undone. As we shoved our dessert remains towards the center of the table, my 17-year-old nephew declared: "Shoddy on the peach pie. " Now everyone knows that my mother makes the best peach pie in the state, and we always argue about the leftovers. Shoddy? I think not. It turns out he was calling dibs on the remaining piece of pie, not dissing it. You'd think I'd be able to decode his vernacular, since I teach hundreds like him every year. But the English language, especially in the hands of teens, changes more quickly than my nephew's girlfriends.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lori Lattanzio says that most of her fifth-grade students at Mary D. Lang Elementary School in Kennett Square are smart and motivated. But, she laments, they will probably fare poorly on the state's most critical standardized test, the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA). That's because English is a second language for them.Some have been in the United States so briefly that they barely know it at all. "This test won't show what these kids are capable of doing," Lattanzio said a day before the tests were administered in late March.
NEWS
January 11, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Grace Hwang doesn't miss a chance to give the police officers in her Korean language class a little ribbing, as she did when she noticed Officer John Donohue among the faces in the training room. "John, you have been missing two weeks," Hwang said, smiling broadly. "So, still your brain works?" Donohue nodded while his classmates - about 16 Upper Darby policemen, a Delaware County paramedic and an assistant district attorney - chuckled. Hwang and her pupils have the kind of easy rapport that she and her husband, the Rev. Peter Hwang, hope will come to exist between the police and the Korean community in Upper Darby.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
IPOs by Facebook and Manchester United notwithstanding, there are other ways to tap deep pockets. Companies can get acquired. Octagon Research Solutions Inc. , a Wayne software company that helps pharmaceutical companies with submitting clinical data to regulators, agreed to be acquired by Accenture P.L.C. earlier this month. Terms of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of September, were not disclosed. At $25.5 billion in net revenues for 2011, Accenture is by far the bigger company.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes
When Akbar Hossain tells his story, others sometimes cry, but he doesn't. The 21-year-old Bengali student from Norristown is so polished and cool that he seems always in command. His family came to the United States when he was 10 and was immediately swindled out of $5,000. The family went on to live crammed into a one-bedroom apartment. Eventually, Hossain watched his father die on their front lawn. "When he told me, it was tough for me to keep it together," said Susan Dicklitch, Hossain's teacher and an associate dean at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster.
SPORTS
March 30, 2012 | By Kerith Gabriel
DANNY MWANGA is trying his utmost to become a chameleon. Adapt, adapt . . . adapt. He conveyed this while speaking with me on Wednesday. He also said - in confidence - he knows his play is not up to the level fans expect. But he's healthy, showing no ill effects from last season's debilitating shoulder and hip injuries. He's happy too, entrusted with being the team's top striker alongside newcomer Lionard Pajoy. But here's the issue. Mwanga, with Pajoy as his third strike partner in as many seasons, has remained the only constant.
SPORTS
April 26, 2011 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
The times when Israel Diaz needs help on a baseball field are rather infrequent. Hitting, fielding, throwing, running . . . no problem. Facing a guy wielding a notepad and No. 2 pencil? Now you're talking . . . And when he does, it's in Spanish. Moments after visiting Frankford High yesterday completed a 16-7 win over Central in a not-exactly-tight, far-from-bright Public A game, coach Juan Namnun, who's of Dominican descent, suspected Diaz might require assistance in answering questions.
SPORTS
January 8, 2011 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
BRIAN BOUCHER has found his Zen. On the ice, Boucher has helped push the Flyers to the top of the Eastern Conference with an 8-1-1 record over his last 10 starts. Off the ice, Boucher has taken up a mentoring role with rookie partner Sergei Bobrovsky - promoting a healthy goalie-to-goalie relationship that isn't always the norm in the NHL. Watching Bobrovsky, a 22-year-old undrafted and unheralded rookie, beat you out for the Opening Night starting job would have thrown most veterans over the edge.
SPORTS
November 9, 2010 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers goalie Sergei Bobrovsky, the unflappable rookie from Russia, goes post to post and makes a sliding save, and now here comes the loud, squawking voice of actor Richard Dreyfuss. Welcome to America, kid. Dreyfuss' voice comes from a scene in the 1991 comedy What About Bob? Dreyfuss plays a psychiatrist gone mad after his patient, Bill Murray's Bob character, tracks him down during his family vacation. He sounds like a parrot in heat as he shouts at his friend: "B-o-o-o-o-o-o-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b!
SPORTS
September 27, 2010
BEHIND A TINTED visor, Nikolai Zherdev's eyes are hidden like a poker player at the final table of a big tournament. Through 2 weeks in Philadelphia, Zherdev remains every bit of the enigma he was when he skated back to Russia in 2009 after an arbitration dispute with the New York Rangers. His shaded visor is just one hint of the complex character that he is, both on and off the ice. "He's hard to figure out," one longtime NHL scout said in the press box in Toronto on Friday, shortly before Zherdev went on to score twice to spark the Flyers to a two-goal comeback win. "Every other shift, he looks like a completely different player.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2010
9 tonight TNT A pregnant woman from Afghanistan needs critical treatment, but the language barrier complicates things. Tom (Michael Vartan, right) prepares to undergo surgery.
SPORTS
February 27, 2010 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The four Chester County kids played baseball for different high schools, but they became best friends and lived together for three years as teammates at Kutztown University. And when Ryan Vogelsong made the majors with the Giants and Pirates, his three friends made frequent trips to see him pitch. When he went to Japan to play for three seasons, they took vacations to boost his confidence. Before he turned pro, they went to Phillies games. Then, at 9 p.m. on New Year's Eve, the Phillies called with an invitation to spring training.
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