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Lani Guinier

NEWS
October 6, 1996 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was a difficult meeting for President Clinton. Lani Guinier was an old friend, and Clinton had nominated her for a big job in his young administration. But she had come under unexpectedly fierce political attack. Now Clinton was going to withdraw her nomination. On that evening, June 3, 1993, the two old friends talked for 75 minutes in the Oval Office, but Clinton never looked Guinier in the eye to tell her that she was through. Instead, he waited until 30 minutes after she had left, then delivered the message by phone.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | For The Inquirer / ELEFTHERIOS KOSTANS
Guest speaker Lani Guinier smiles at a graduating student at Swarthmore College. The University of Pennsylvania law professor received an honorary law degree yesterday at the college's 124th commencement, where 333 undergraduate degrees were awarded.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | Daily News wire services
INDIANAPOLIS GORE COURTS NAACP LEADERS Vice President Al Gore tried to improve the administration's strained relations with black people yesterday, telling the NAACP it was time for new civil-rights gains after a decade fighting "the radical right. " He was politely received by the audience. But the organization's board chairman told the same crowd that President Clinton had "kicked us in our teeth" in not sticking with the nomination of Lani Guinier. The administration is trying to improve relations with minority groups after enraging many when Clinton withdrew his nomination of Guinier for the top civil rights job at the Justice Department.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
Nine months and two tries after he withdrew Lani Guinier's nomination as assistant attorney general for civil rights, President Clinton has finally stumbled upon a credible candidate for the job. Maybe. Even before the nomination of Boston lawyer Deval Patrick was announced yesterday, familar ominous clouds were gathering on the horizon. Blowing in hard from the far right was Clint Bolick, vice president and litigation director for the Institute for Justice - or shill for ultra-conservatives, if you decode his title.
NEWS
June 5, 1993
Can't anybody here play this game? - Casey Stengel, on the 1962 New York Mets It's tempting to compare President Clinton's rookie season to that of the Colorado Rockies - but the Rockies are doing better. No, you've got to go back to the "amazin' " Mets' rookie season in 1962 - amazin' because it was so utterly awful - to find an equal to Clinton's hit- starved error-filled performance. The guy isn't hitting his weight. At Lani Guinier's press conference yesterday, hours after Clinton withdrew her nomination to be deputy attorney general for civil rights, she displayed the qualities that undoubtedly won her Clinton's nod in the first place.
NEWS
June 13, 1993
Having joined with considerable enthusiasm the pummeling of Penn president Sheldon Hackney for his less-than-heroic stands as the campus newspaper was trashed and the epithet "water buffalo" launched an Alice-in-Wonderland judicial inquiry, may we now say: Whoa! As Mr. Hackney inches closer to hearings on his fitness to head the National Endowment for the Humanities, he is not merely being questioned (as well he should be), but being beaten to a pulp. Things have gotten runaway ugly.
NEWS
January 24, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Linda Wright Moore contributed to this report
Sure, she was dumped before she got a hearing to run the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department. But Harvard University seems to think Lani Guinier has the right stuff. Yesterday, the university gushingly announced that Guinier will become a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. She is the first woman of color to join the tenured faculty. "She is a gifted and extraordinarily effective teacher, as the students who had her when she visited here will attest," said Law School Dean Robert Clark.
NEWS
June 4, 1993
THOSE WHO DISTORT GUINIER'S RECORD Lani Guinier is not a radical. Rather, she is a hero in the best tradition of Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman and other women who have stood up to speak for and protect those who have no voice. Lani was among the first civil rights lawyers to try and win cases under the amended Voting Rights Act. She successfully tried the landmark Thornburg v. Gingles case (that made it easier for minorities to challenge redistricting plans that diluted their power)
NEWS
June 6, 1993
Lani Guinier was no Zoe Baird. Everything she did was legal and above- board, and her views were there for all to see long before President Clinton nominated her to head the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department. The President's embarrassing withdrawal of her nomination Thursday night is a reflection on him and the people who advise him. She can return to her job as a respected law professor at the University of Pennsylvania with her pride and reputation intact. That said, the President's main failing was not in withdrawing the nomination, but in nominating Professor Guinier in the first place.
NEWS
October 18, 1993 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever wonder how Lani Guinier would have explained her views on civil rights had President Clinton not withdrawn her nomination? Find out on Nov. 11 at Widener University. Guinier, a University of Pennsylvania law professor and Clinton's first choice to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, is part of Widener's lineup of lecturers and performers for 1993-94. All events are free and open to the public. Clinton selected, then rejected Guinier, his longtime friend, because of controversy over her academic writings about remedying race discrimination in local politics.
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