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Lankenau

NEWS
June 20, 2000 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Doctors will keep delivering babies at Lankenau Hospital and mending hearts at Bryn Mawr Hospital while taking open-heart surgery into Chester County, under a long-range plan that Main Line Health officials are presenting at community meetings this summer. The 10-year strategic plan sets aside a controversial 1996 proposal to consolidate heart surgery at Lankenau, in Wynnewood, and move Lankenau's obstetrical services to Bryn Mawr. Officials also foresee investing $100 million at Lankenau to build a new emergency department, expand obstetrical and cardiovascular services, and upgrade intensive-care facilities, said Barry Rabner, president of Main Line Hospitals, a part of the system.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The owner of one of the largest funeral homes in Burlington County has filed a lawsuit to keep Pemberton Township from becoming a two-hearse town, at least for now. Lankenau Funeral Home, the sole mortuary in the township, wants a Superior Court judge to block a competitor's plans to open a funeral business on the same street, Lakehurst Road, a quarter-mile away. The lawsuit, filed last week, contends that the Zoning Board should not have approved a use variance for John D. Moore, who is renovating the former Fat Rocks Bar for use as a funeral home.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Vincent J. Cristofalo's office is on a side corridor at Lankenau Hospital, mostly out of view, like the Lankenau Medical Research Center he now heads. "It's the best-kept secret in the Delaware Valley," Cristofalo said of the center. He aims to change that. An internationally known researcher in the field of aging, Cristofalo wants the center to make a more visible mark. "I think we have the raw material to do it," he said. Cristofalo, 66, of Lower Merion, became the center's president in December after leaving his research, academic and administrative posts within the Allegheny Health System, whose southeastern Pennsylvania operations filed for bankruptcy protection in 1998.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sarah J. Blake, domestic-abuse social worker for Main Line Health, has been on the job since spring. The number of identified abuse victims already has started climbing, she said. "Before we had a program, we were seeing almost nothing," said Blake, who serves clients at Lankenau, Bryn Mawr and Paoli Memorial Hospitals. That is because domestic abuse hides in the shadows, an easy secret to overlook. Victims may be so accustomed to abuse, she said, that they do not recognize it themselves.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Main Line Health's plan to reconfigure its Bryn Mawr Hospital campus has hit a snag with the rejection of its request to demolish the century-old Gerhard Building. The gray stone structure, with its gabled roof and arched entry, was designed by the firm of Victorian architect Frank Furness, whose work preservationists are trying to save throughout Lower Merion. "We have sent a letter out denying the application because that is part of a larger plan that would require land-development approval," Robert Duncan, Lower Merion Township's building department director, said yesterday.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Salvatore the Balloon Man had just started twisting one of the tools of his trade into a giraffe when - pop! - it broke and startled 4-year-old Emma Starr. "That's OK," said Sal, a.k.a. Salvatore Giammona, who hails from Medford, Burlington County. "The worst thing that happens when a balloon breaks is you get air all over you. " Satisfied, Emma ran off into the crowd of children and parents who were gathered in the cafeteria at Lankenau Hospital for the annual Neonatal Intensive Care Unit reunion yesterday.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
The driver of a chemical truck yesterday noticed smoke coming from the rig's trailer around 2 p.m. and pulled into the driveway of Lankenau Hospital on Lancaster Avenue. Emergency units planned to shoot foam into the trailer but air rushed in and ignited the materials. The fire was allowed to burn itself out.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Main Line Health plans to invest $30 million to construct and equip a new outpatient-surgery center and cardiac-catheterization suite, to open in Lankenau Hospital in 1999. The plan was announced yesterday after a vote of approval Thursday by the hospital network's board of trustees. Main Line Health includes Lankenau, Bryn Mawr and Paoli Memorial Hospitals and is part of the Jefferson Health System. The new cardiac facility will have five catheterization labs for procedures such as balloon angioplasty, in which a tiny balloon is inserted into the heart artery, said Richard Wells, spokesman for Main Line Health.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, John DeMaio and his partners cared for fragile infants admitted to the newborn intensive care unit at Lankenau Hospital. For their work, they won praise from parents and colleagues. "This was a labor of love for me," said the 40-year-old doctor, who was the chief of the unit. "I loved that institution and all of its people. " During his Lankenau career, the hospital went through two mergers, most recently in 1995, when it became part of the sprawling, billion-dollar Jefferson Health System.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pet owners for years have been coming to "Lankenau Park," as they have dubbed the undeveloped private property behind Lankenau Hospital, to let their dogs romp and to socialize. But the dogs' days here are about to end. No-trespassing signs are to be posted this week in the 40-acre area behind a Lankenau parking garage. They will be followed shortly by a 1,000-foot stretch of fence blocking access from Penn Wynne Park, said hospital spokesman Richard Wells. Lankenau officials decided to close off the property after some Penn Wynne neighbors complained.
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