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Lankenau

NEWS
July 1, 1998 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
The driver of a chemical truck yesterday noticed smoke coming from the rig's trailer around 2 p.m. and pulled into the driveway of Lankenau Hospital on Lancaster Avenue. Emergency units planned to shoot foam into the trailer but air rushed in and ignited the materials. The fire was allowed to burn itself out.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Main Line Health plans to invest $30 million to construct and equip a new outpatient-surgery center and cardiac-catheterization suite, to open in Lankenau Hospital in 1999. The plan was announced yesterday after a vote of approval Thursday by the hospital network's board of trustees. Main Line Health includes Lankenau, Bryn Mawr and Paoli Memorial Hospitals and is part of the Jefferson Health System. The new cardiac facility will have five catheterization labs for procedures such as balloon angioplasty, in which a tiny balloon is inserted into the heart artery, said Richard Wells, spokesman for Main Line Health.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, John DeMaio and his partners cared for fragile infants admitted to the newborn intensive care unit at Lankenau Hospital. For their work, they won praise from parents and colleagues. "This was a labor of love for me," said the 40-year-old doctor, who was the chief of the unit. "I loved that institution and all of its people. " During his Lankenau career, the hospital went through two mergers, most recently in 1995, when it became part of the sprawling, billion-dollar Jefferson Health System.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pet owners for years have been coming to "Lankenau Park," as they have dubbed the undeveloped private property behind Lankenau Hospital, to let their dogs romp and to socialize. But the dogs' days here are about to end. No-trespassing signs are to be posted this week in the 40-acre area behind a Lankenau parking garage. They will be followed shortly by a 1,000-foot stretch of fence blocking access from Penn Wynne Park, said hospital spokesman Richard Wells. Lankenau officials decided to close off the property after some Penn Wynne neighbors complained.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The hospital gift shop is going corporate. For many stores, the only way to survive has been to turn over their operations to retail chains. The gift-shop business simply had become too demanding and complex for many hospitals to manage. Deficits have plagued some. Others were too small to negotiate favorable discounts with vendors. And many could not meet customer demands for longer hours. The shops had become relics of a simpler time before medicine took on the mantle of big business, and when volunteers or hospital workers, rather than retail experts, could oversee the operations.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After running into a buzz saw of opposition from doctors and some patients, Lankenau Hospital has backed off from plans to turn itself into a specialty heart hospital by shedding such traditional services as delivering babies and replacing hips. At least for now. Under the original plan, announced in September, most of Lankenau's other services, except its emergency room, would have been shifted four miles down the road to its sister hospital, Bryn Mawr. In exchange, Bryn Mawr agreed to steer patients requiring cardiac care to Lankenau in Wynnewood.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's no such thing anymore as a free lunch for the 350 volunteers at Lankenau Hospital. No more $3.25 chicken-salad sandwich. Or $2.35 hamburger, $1.50 large soup, 25-cent-per-ounce salad bar, or . . . In all, the volunteers ate more than $50,000 gratis a year. In these hard-nosed times, when hospitals are looking everywhere to slash expenses, nothing is off-limits - not even a long-cherished perk for dedicated volunteers. "They are not immune to the changes going on in health care, just as employees are not, doctors are not and patients are not," said Richard Wells, a spokesman for Main Line Health, which is the parent of Lankenau Hospital in Lower Merion Township.
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Got two minutes? That's about how long it takes Ken Hanover, striding briskly down a hospital corridor, to deliver a capsule analysis of health-care issues, strategically salted with statistics. Explaining why hospitals must regroup to survive is something he does a lot these days. Hanover is president and chief executive of Main Line Health System, the umbrella organization for Lankenau, Bryn Mawr and Paoli Memorial Hospitals, Bryn Mawr Rehab and Community Home Health Affiliates.
NEWS
September 18, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
News of a plan to make Lankenau Hospital a heart center and progressively move many of its other medical in-patient services to Bryn Mawr Hospital raised eyebrows and set lunch-time conversations buzzing at both institutions yesterday. Employees puzzled over how the changes would affect their jobs, and several local residents said they found the changes disconcerting. "This is our hospital," Penn Valley resident Sheila Moses said of Lankenau. "I happen to love the nursing staff and support services.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Mary Blakinger contributed to this report
Lankenau Hospital is betting its future on the lucrative but increasingly competitive business of caring for people's hearts. Officials at the Wynnewood hospital yesterday said they would shed all of their traditional services - from delivering babies to replacing hips - in favor of a risky new strategy: specializing in open-heart surgery and related cardiac services. Under the plan, most of the Lankenau's traditional services, except its emergency room, will be shifted four miles down the road to its sister facility, Bryn Mawr Hospital.
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