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Lankenau

BUSINESS
April 7, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The hospital gift shop is going corporate. For many stores, the only way to survive has been to turn over their operations to retail chains. The gift-shop business simply had become too demanding and complex for many hospitals to manage. Deficits have plagued some. Others were too small to negotiate favorable discounts with vendors. And many could not meet customer demands for longer hours. The shops had become relics of a simpler time before medicine took on the mantle of big business, and when volunteers or hospital workers, rather than retail experts, could oversee the operations.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After running into a buzz saw of opposition from doctors and some patients, Lankenau Hospital has backed off from plans to turn itself into a specialty heart hospital by shedding such traditional services as delivering babies and replacing hips. At least for now. Under the original plan, announced in September, most of Lankenau's other services, except its emergency room, would have been shifted four miles down the road to its sister hospital, Bryn Mawr. In exchange, Bryn Mawr agreed to steer patients requiring cardiac care to Lankenau in Wynnewood.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's no such thing anymore as a free lunch for the 350 volunteers at Lankenau Hospital. No more $3.25 chicken-salad sandwich. Or $2.35 hamburger, $1.50 large soup, 25-cent-per-ounce salad bar, or . . . In all, the volunteers ate more than $50,000 gratis a year. In these hard-nosed times, when hospitals are looking everywhere to slash expenses, nothing is off-limits - not even a long-cherished perk for dedicated volunteers. "They are not immune to the changes going on in health care, just as employees are not, doctors are not and patients are not," said Richard Wells, a spokesman for Main Line Health, which is the parent of Lankenau Hospital in Lower Merion Township.
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Got two minutes? That's about how long it takes Ken Hanover, striding briskly down a hospital corridor, to deliver a capsule analysis of health-care issues, strategically salted with statistics. Explaining why hospitals must regroup to survive is something he does a lot these days. Hanover is president and chief executive of Main Line Health System, the umbrella organization for Lankenau, Bryn Mawr and Paoli Memorial Hospitals, Bryn Mawr Rehab and Community Home Health Affiliates.
NEWS
September 18, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
News of a plan to make Lankenau Hospital a heart center and progressively move many of its other medical in-patient services to Bryn Mawr Hospital raised eyebrows and set lunch-time conversations buzzing at both institutions yesterday. Employees puzzled over how the changes would affect their jobs, and several local residents said they found the changes disconcerting. "This is our hospital," Penn Valley resident Sheila Moses said of Lankenau. "I happen to love the nursing staff and support services.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Mary Blakinger contributed to this report
Lankenau Hospital is betting its future on the lucrative but increasingly competitive business of caring for people's hearts. Officials at the Wynnewood hospital yesterday said they would shed all of their traditional services - from delivering babies to replacing hips - in favor of a risky new strategy: specializing in open-heart surgery and related cardiac services. Under the plan, most of the Lankenau's traditional services, except its emergency room, will be shifted four miles down the road to its sister facility, Bryn Mawr Hospital.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Citing insufficient need, state officials have denied approval of outpatient surgery centers planned separately by Mercy Haverford Hospital in Havertown and Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood. Both institutions say they need the facilities to survive in an era when insurance companies press for reduced in-hospital care and costs. And both institutions say patients in their communities need convenient access to the medical procedures the centers would offer. In January, the state Health Department concluded that each hospital was in a county that had more than enough operating rooms.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To improve Lankenau Hospital's financial health, administrators say they have a cure: a state-of-the-art facility to lure patients for minor surgery that does not require overnight care. But some of the hospital's Penn Wynne neighbors wonder whether Lankenau's cure will do them harm. They worry about the glare of bright lights, the noise of air-conditioning units, and the bustle of traffic - annoyances they say could jeopardize the well-being of their small suburban community.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The visitors marveled at the high-tech equipment used throughout Lankenau Hospital. Then they came upon a display of antiquated medical instruments in the hospital's Health Education Center. "The tools they are showing as relics are what we use now," joked Madina Kurralova, an eye surgeon from Kazakhstan, a Asian country that was part of the Soviet Union. Kurralova was kidding, but much about the machinery at the Main Line hospital did impress her and Aysa Enkeev, an otolaryngologist from the Russian republic of Kalmyk, on the northwest shore of the Caspian Sea. The pair of 30-year-old women, who met through American friends, took a three-hour tour of Lankenau last week during a two-week visit to the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
September 1, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lucrative health-care market on the Main Line has attracted the interest of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which is developing plans to open a medical office here. But a battle lies ahead, as competitors such as Main Line Health System continue to fight to preserve their interests. Penn has an agreement to purchase the four-story building, the former TV Guide offices, at King of Prussia and Radnor-Chester Roads, for an undisclosed sum. Penn's medical and business offices will occupy the first and second floor and a current tenant, Fidelity Mutual, will continue to use the third and fourth.
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