CollectionsLaptop
IN THE NEWS

Laptop

NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By John P. Martin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Seattle-based security firm says it needed just hours to hack into a version of the laptop tracking system that the Lower Merion School District used, suggesting that tech-savvy outsiders could have commandeered the computers and watched students through their webcams. The company, Leviathan Security Group, said it launched the review after realizing that some of its clients were using the same system, LANrev, that drew an international spotlight to Lower Merion. Leviathan executives said they had no reason to believe anyone had breached Lower Merion's system.
NEWS
September 5, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The biggest problem she foresees, says Elaine Brown, is that there's no three-pronged outlet in her bedroom. This means that when she wants to attend her college seminar she may actually have to go downstairs to plug in her laptop. "I really need to get an adaptor," she said. "Or you can use the battery pack," said classmate Kerry Boody. "That's good for two hours," added Pat Conboy. "Then I can stay in bed," said Brown. This conversation, just slightly tongue-in-cheek, took place last week among a group of freshmen at Penn State/Delco - students who will, in fact, soon be able to take classes without getting out of their pajamas.
NEWS
March 28, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Between the pending solicitation charges and his divorce, former Horsham Police Officer Thomas Vance Crow already had troubles. Then his estranged wife found his laptop hidden in a garage toolbox - the same laptop, court records say, Crow had reported stolen in a 2002 car break-in. After she told police, Crow, 36, was arrested yesterday for the second time in eight months. Crow, due back in court Monday on charges he solicited prostitutes while on duty last summer and then tried to cover it up, now faces new charges including felony counts of insurance fraud, receiving stolen property and theft by deception, as well as lying to authorities.
NEWS
April 21, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blake Robbins should have known better. So says the official who ran the Lower Merion School District's controversial computer security system when it snapped Robbins' picture in his home and led to his invasion-of-privacy suit against the district. Even in his own home, the Harriton High School sophomore had "no legitimate expectation of privacy" from the camera on his school-issued laptop, information systems coordinator Carol Cafiero contended in a court filing on Tuesday.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's rugged, and it runs Windows. In fact, this laptop computer for cops is so tough it can take a cup of Joe splashed on the keyboard and a .22-caliber slug in the metal casing without crashing, at least not permanently. But, says XL Computing Corp., the company that makes the thick-skinned PCMobile, police shouldn't expect the laptops to replace Kevlar vests in dangerous situations. "We don't encourage police to use it as a shield, but it will stop most bullets," boasted company official Albert "Bud" Hawk.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | By Noel E. Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In addition to their guns and nightsticks, some Glassboro police officers now are toting laptop computers in their patrol cars - a system that will give them faster access to law enforcement information. The wireless Mobile Data Communication System, called the "Packet Cluster Patrol," cost $85,000. The laptops are connected to a host computer in police headquarters that has the ability to tap into records of the state's Criminal Justice Information System and Division of Motor Vehicles, and the National Crime Information Center.
NEWS
March 19, 2010 | By Dan Hardy and Joseph Tanfani INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A group of Lower Merion School District parents asked a federal judge yesterday for a say in resolving the laptop spying lawsuit filed last month. The parents want answers and privacy assurances about the use of cameras on district-issued student laptops, they said in a court filing. But they also want to avoid costly damage awards or a drawn-out class-action litigation with high legal fees, they said. The motion was filed by three couples and their lawyers, all members of a group called lmsdparents.
NEWS
December 20, 1993 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
Now that economists have pointed to the Christmas shopping season's robust start as a factor in the nation's economic recovery, my friend Barton is wondering whether it's his patriotic duty to go out and buy a lot of things he can't actually afford. "If this country needs me to buy a new VCR, I guess I'm ready to serve," he told me on the telephone the other day, "but do you think I'd be helping out almost as much if I bought it in the after-Christmas sales?" As I acknowledged several months ago in a discussion of how I was coping with discussions of the Clinton economic package, my standard evasion - "It's too soon to tell" - has been getting a little shopworn.
NEWS
July 28, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally, Inquirer Staff Writer
The letter from Lower Merion school administrators delivered the news three weeks ago - her son had been secretly monitored by the webcam on his school-issued laptop. But only when Fatima Hasan saw the evidence did the scope of the spying on her son Jalil become apparent. There were more than 1,000 images surreptitiously captured by the computer - 469 webcam photographs and 543 screen shots. All were evidence in the case against the Lower Merion School District and its now-abandoned electronic monitoring policy.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
One woman was sitting in a window seat at La Colombe, lost in a discussion about a Macy's sale, when someone snatched her wallet from her purse. Alyssa Abbott had just finished lunch at a Chestnut Street cafe when she noticed how light her tote bag felt. And Temple University student Rachael Young was packing up her laptop at Starbucks when she realized her wallet was gone. Pickpockets. Or, more precisely, the work of what police now call "sneak thieves. " If the best friend of the coffeehouse thief is distraction, then the holiday season, with its crowded shops of hurried shoppers, offers the pickpocket prime opportunities.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|