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Lar Lubovitch

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2009 | By Nancy G. Heller FOR THE INQUIRER
So many men, and so much excellent dancing. Unlike most troupes, whose rosters are female-heavy, the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a nationwide tour that features seven beautifully trained men and four women - who aren't chopped liver, either. Lubovitch's troupe began its run at the Annenberg Center on Thursday night, presenting three of his works, an old favorite and two new compositions. The program opened with Lubovitch's signature piece, Concerto Six Twenty-Two, set to Mozart's Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1995 | By Bing Mark, FOR THE INQUIRER
The skills required to make truly musical choreography are very rare. But they are skills that Lar Lubovitch has long possessed. The Lar Lubovitch Dance Company, at 27 years, is one of the most stable and popular modern-dance companies in the country. Lubovitch knows every trick, hook, and choreographic principle in the book; he even seems to have invented a few of them himself. Opening night on Thursday at Annenberg Center was top-notch entertainment; the dancing was fine, generous, and as comfortable as a familiar sweater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Ellen Dunkel, For The Inquirer
In May, Lar Lubovitch was awarded the prize for best choreography at the 20th annual Benois de la Danse, one of the most prestigious honors in the dance world. Lubovitch was the first American choreographer ever to win the prize, presented at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. So it was extra-special that Lar Lubovitch Dance Company performed the piece that earned him that honor, Crisis Variations, when the popular Dance Celebration series opened its 30th season Thursday night at the Annenberg Center.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Most Great Performances programs concentrate on the work of one choreographer. The latest one, which airs tonight at 11 on Channel 12, makes a pitch for diversity by pairing a dance by Lar Lubovitch with one by Moses Pendleton and his Momix troupe. Lubovitch means to heighten our experience by showing human beings in an idealized form - as dancers pure and simple. Pendleton, meanwhile, with his surrealistic bent, makes a further jump. He turns dancers into geometric shapes, animals, creatures of the imagination.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Lar Lubovitch is too talented and young a choreographer to be fastened to a particular work, to be known as the man who made the adagio of Concerto Six Twenty-Two. Yet the work is extraordinary enough to warrant the fame it has brought Lubovitch. Since it was created in 1986, I have seen the dance maybe four times, and each time the audience responds as it if were electrically charged. Last night, when the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company performed at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater as part of the New Dance series of Dance Celebration, was no exception.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | by Janet Anderson, Daily News Dance Critic
Joyous, physical, athletic, life-affirming - these words tumble from the lips of critics and audiences about the dances of Lar Lubovitch. And why not? That is how the dances look, and that is how they make people feel. Lubovitch was once considered something of a young upstart in the realms of modern dance, with his abstract dances propelled by melody rather than message. Now he is in his 23rd year of creating choreography for his own company - he has 50 works to date - and is beginning to assume his rightful place as a modern dance master.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2000 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Martha, Martha, Martha! For the sold-out audience of Saturday night's Shut Up and Dance at the Forrest Theater, the special attraction was modern-dance legend Martha Graham, channeled though the imposing person of Bessie-winning dancer/cabaret artist Richard Move. This was the eighth edition of this benefit performance staged by dancers of the Pennsylvania Ballet to benefit Manna, an organization providing meals for people with HIV/AIDS. Move, hereafter referred to respectfully as Miss Graham, introduced the evening's works in a succession of scintillating yet regal costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Chicago Repertory Dance Ensemble brings a whodunnit to the Painted Bride Art Center Friday through Sunday. But mystery buffs take note, this is not a tidy Agatha Christie puzzler introduced by elegant Diana Riggs. "What Are We Going to Do with Mary," (subtitled "The Schizophrenia of Preston Carlisle") is, by all accounts, a fairly Gothic dance-melodrama, full of murder, madness - and a lot of laughs. If that sounds like a fairly incongruous combination, well, apparently that's what gives the full-length production its quirky charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The big dramatic turn in The Red Shoes comes when the impresario Boris Lermontov finally confesses his love for his dancing protegee, Victoria Page, in a long song. This is the moment when the character sheds his villainous image and becomes somewhat sympathetic - and it ought to be his moment alone. It's telling of the show's lifelessness that the director found it necessary to bring on a vision of Victoria dancing in the middle of Lermontov's aria, as it were. It's the dancing that keeps the scene from completely sinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1996 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What do medieval beasties have to do with us? More than you think, answers Gian Carlo Menotti's The Unicorn, the Gorgon and the Manticore, a madrigal fable sweetly staged by the Philadelphia Singers and Convergence Dancers and Musicians over the weekend. Nearly as rare as its beasts, The Unicorn has hardly been seen in the 40 years since its New York City Ballet premiere. Nowhere near the sightings of Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat, another brilliant fable whose ideas Menotti builds upon.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Ellen Dunkel, For The Inquirer
In May, Lar Lubovitch was awarded the prize for best choreography at the 20th annual Benois de la Danse, one of the most prestigious honors in the dance world. Lubovitch was the first American choreographer ever to win the prize, presented at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. So it was extra-special that Lar Lubovitch Dance Company performed the piece that earned him that honor, Crisis Variations, when the popular Dance Celebration series opened its 30th season Thursday night at the Annenberg Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2009 | By Nancy G. Heller FOR THE INQUIRER
So many men, and so much excellent dancing. Unlike most troupes, whose rosters are female-heavy, the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a nationwide tour that features seven beautifully trained men and four women - who aren't chopped liver, either. Lubovitch's troupe began its run at the Annenberg Center on Thursday night, presenting three of his works, an old favorite and two new compositions. The program opened with Lubovitch's signature piece, Concerto Six Twenty-Two, set to Mozart's Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2000 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Martha, Martha, Martha! For the sold-out audience of Saturday night's Shut Up and Dance at the Forrest Theater, the special attraction was modern-dance legend Martha Graham, channeled though the imposing person of Bessie-winning dancer/cabaret artist Richard Move. This was the eighth edition of this benefit performance staged by dancers of the Pennsylvania Ballet to benefit Manna, an organization providing meals for people with HIV/AIDS. Move, hereafter referred to respectfully as Miss Graham, introduced the evening's works in a succession of scintillating yet regal costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1996 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What do medieval beasties have to do with us? More than you think, answers Gian Carlo Menotti's The Unicorn, the Gorgon and the Manticore, a madrigal fable sweetly staged by the Philadelphia Singers and Convergence Dancers and Musicians over the weekend. Nearly as rare as its beasts, The Unicorn has hardly been seen in the 40 years since its New York City Ballet premiere. Nowhere near the sightings of Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat, another brilliant fable whose ideas Menotti builds upon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1995 | By Bing Mark, FOR THE INQUIRER
The skills required to make truly musical choreography are very rare. But they are skills that Lar Lubovitch has long possessed. The Lar Lubovitch Dance Company, at 27 years, is one of the most stable and popular modern-dance companies in the country. Lubovitch knows every trick, hook, and choreographic principle in the book; he even seems to have invented a few of them himself. Opening night on Thursday at Annenberg Center was top-notch entertainment; the dancing was fine, generous, and as comfortable as a familiar sweater.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The big dramatic turn in The Red Shoes comes when the impresario Boris Lermontov finally confesses his love for his dancing protegee, Victoria Page, in a long song. This is the moment when the character sheds his villainous image and becomes somewhat sympathetic - and it ought to be his moment alone. It's telling of the show's lifelessness that the director found it necessary to bring on a vision of Victoria dancing in the middle of Lermontov's aria, as it were. It's the dancing that keeps the scene from completely sinking.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Most Great Performances programs concentrate on the work of one choreographer. The latest one, which airs tonight at 11 on Channel 12, makes a pitch for diversity by pairing a dance by Lar Lubovitch with one by Moses Pendleton and his Momix troupe. Lubovitch means to heighten our experience by showing human beings in an idealized form - as dancers pure and simple. Pendleton, meanwhile, with his surrealistic bent, makes a further jump. He turns dancers into geometric shapes, animals, creatures of the imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Dance Celebration ends its 1990-91 season in grand style, with an all- Mozart program given by a company that probably offers more dance value on a per-second basis than any other modern dance group in this country. In fact, so dense is Lar Lubovitch's style and so wholeheartedly does his troupe perform, one can easily leave the theater feeling dazed from surfeit as well as elated. That woozy sensation was heightened by the nature of the program, which opened Wednesday and runs at the Annenberg Center through tomorrow night.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | by Janet Anderson, Daily News Dance Critic
Joyous, physical, athletic, life-affirming - these words tumble from the lips of critics and audiences about the dances of Lar Lubovitch. And why not? That is how the dances look, and that is how they make people feel. Lubovitch was once considered something of a young upstart in the realms of modern dance, with his abstract dances propelled by melody rather than message. Now he is in his 23rd year of creating choreography for his own company - he has 50 works to date - and is beginning to assume his rightful place as a modern dance master.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Chicago Repertory Dance Ensemble brings a whodunnit to the Painted Bride Art Center Friday through Sunday. But mystery buffs take note, this is not a tidy Agatha Christie puzzler introduced by elegant Diana Riggs. "What Are We Going to Do with Mary," (subtitled "The Schizophrenia of Preston Carlisle") is, by all accounts, a fairly Gothic dance-melodrama, full of murder, madness - and a lot of laughs. If that sounds like a fairly incongruous combination, well, apparently that's what gives the full-length production its quirky charm.
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