CollectionsLarry Andersen
IN THE NEWS

Larry Andersen

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 24, 1993 | By Gwen Knapp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry Andersen is about to join a fairly distinguished line of relief- pitchers-turned-authors. He's been working on a book about the Phillies ever since spring training, he said yesterday, and he has about 400 pages of manuscript so far. The working title is Immature Forever, but don't expect another Ball Four (former Seattle Pilots and Houston Astros reliever Jim Bouton) or Bronx Zoo (ex-Yanks bullpen ace Sparky Lyle). "There won't be any dirt," he said, adding that several teammates know about his work in progress.
SPORTS
October 7, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Early this morning, Larry Andersen, in his 23d year of playing professional baseball, was standing in the Phillies' clubhouse with an ice pack around his arm, marveling at the truth of one of the game's most time-honored cliches: Baseball is a game of inches. "In a sense, the whole game comes down to Avery's wild pitch," he said. He was referring to Steve Avery, the Braves' starter, who had only four wild pitches all season long, and one yesterday in the sixth that allowed the Phillies to take a one-run lead.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of John Felske's greatest claims to fame as manager of the Phillies was that six years ago, he released two pitchers named Dave Stewart and Larry Andersen in the same week. Now the Phillies are trying to bring one of those guys back. The Phillies' desperate search for anyone resembling a relief pitcher has led them to the door of Andersen, a 39-year-old righthander who is currently adrift on the free-agent seas after two seasons in San Diego. Andersen is the best of the righthanded setup men still on the market.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the last several years, Larry Andersen has been comfortable pitching on the mound, teaching prospects in the Phillies' farm system, or even cutting up in the clubhouse. Now, he intends to make himself at home in your living room. When the Phillies begin the 1998 season, Andersen will start his broadcasting career as an analyst on both television and radio, and all he wants you to do is save him a seat at your place. That's the kind of guy Andersen is: personable, approachable, and very much one of you. In that way, he's a lot like the man he's replacing, Richie Ashburn, who died in September.
SPORTS
August 13, 1993 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's time for the general manager to put down the phone and stop searching for relief help. The Phillies aren't winning despite their bullpen these days. They're winning because of it. Yesterday, before the Phillies' 11th straight home crowd of more than 40,000, the bullpen pitched five scoreless innings to key a 7-4 victory over the Montreal Expos. Roger Mason, the 6-foot-6 righthander acquired when the Phils sent Tim Mauser to San Diego on July 3, pitched two scoreless innings and notched the win. He was 0-7 as a Padre.
SPORTS
May 22, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry Andersen turned and watched Bobby Bonilla's soaring eighth-inning drive. He didn't immediately see the ball, but he was sure he had spotted another Phillies loss. "It wasn't a question of whether Lenny (Dykstra) was going to catch it," Andersen said. "I was just wondering how far into the Holiday Inn parking lot that thing was going to land. He crushed it. " But Bonilla's bomb, with the tying run at second, was too high to leave Veterans Stadium, even on a night when the air was as thin as umpire Joe West's skin.
SPORTS
October 15, 1993 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Larry Andersen, the humor-meister of the Phillies clubhouse, to find the perfect description for the club's often overlooked pitching staff. "We're throwbacks," he said early yesterday, as the team's National League pennant celebration lingered on. "People caught us and threw us back in the pond because they didn't want us. " Nobody thought these throwbacks could match up on the mound with the Atlanta Braves, who own the best four-man rotation in baseball, including two Cy Young Award winners, an NL all-star and an all-star in the making.
SPORTS
February 16, 1998 | STEVEN M. FALK/ DAILY NEWS
Notorious jokester Larry Andersen, the newest member of the Phillies broadcasting team, wipes shaving-cream pie from face after taking direct hit from Curt Schilling while being interviewed by Chris Wheeler at spring training.
NEWS
June 19, 2008
MY COMPANION and I totally agree with Liam Tolen, who wrote about "Parking Wheels in the Dugout"! Many times we have to mute the TV because he's so annoying! It would be great if they'd get Larry Andersen back. Like Rich Ashburn always said, "If you don't have anything to say about the game, then don't say anything. " Mildred Units Sellersville
SPORTS
February 25, 2004 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Kalas always expected to be in the broadcast booth at Citizens Bank Park. It became official yesterday. The Phillies announced that Kalas had signed a three-year contract with the team. They also announced that they have named their restaurant in the park's Ashburn Alley after him. It will be called Harry the K's. "I'm really excited about opening the new ballpark," Kalas, 67, said yesterday in a teleconference. "I felt like it was going to happen. It took a little longer than I anticipated, but I really felt like it was going to happen.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 23, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - When Phillippe Aumont stepped onto a mound for the first time during spring training, Larry Andersen worked on an adjacent field. Andersen glanced at the seven pitchers about to throw bullpen sessions, and the 6-foot-7 Canadian towered above them all. Andersen viewed Aumont's maddening flashes of brilliance from a distance in his role as Phillies radio analyst. This spring, as a guest instructor, Andersen is charged with molding the younger arms. He dashed that morning toward Aumont.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Reity O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hundreds of cheering fans crowded street corners near City Hall on Friday afternoon, embracing the Phillies Rally Trolley as it traveled through Center City to psych up the town before Saturday's postseason opener against the St. Louis Cardinals. Along for the ride were the Phillie Phanatic, Phillies ball girls, broadcasters Tom McCarthy and Larry Andersen, and team officials, who threw thousands of rally towels into the extended arms of the baseball faithful. Vanessa Whittington Roberts, 53, of Yeadon, stood in front of LOVE Park hoping to catch a glimpse of the trolley - and get a white rally towel.
SPORTS
June 30, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
Only two pitchers in Phillies history have longer scoreless streaks than the 32 innings Cliff Lee will take into his next start at Toronto on Sunday. One of them is Phillies radio broadcaster Larry Andersen, who went 32 straight without giving up a run in 1984. The difference between the two, of course, is that L.A. was a reliever. "I think it's tougher what he's doing, tougher for a starter, because they're facing the same guys over and over. As a reliever, you might face the same team five different times in a streak, but maybe not face the same hitters," Andersen said.
SPORTS
April 14, 2011 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON – Eighteen years ago, Larry Andersen stared down Barry Bonds after the San Francisco Giants superstar launched a long home run deep into the right-field seats at Candlestick Park. Andersen did not like the amount of time Bonds spent admiring his work before getting to the business of rounding the bases during a win over the Phillies. Eighteen years later, Andersen still is not a huge Bonds fan, but he had no exceptional reaction to the news Wednesday that baseball's all-time home run leader had been convicted of obstruction of justice.
SPORTS
September 29, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
When your paycheck comes from the team you are broadcasting for, Larry Andersen concedes that it can be a fine line between being "honest" and "too honest" in your analysis of the game. But in 13 years in the Phillies booth, Andersen has walked that fine line with a light touch that has endeared him to what can be a demanding public. In a survey conducted by the Daily News in conjunction with the Sport Industry Research Center at Temple University, Andersen was chosen by the fans as the No. 1 color commentator in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
July 27, 2008 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The slider can be a crucial part of a pitcher's repertoire. Hall of Famer Steve Carlton had one of the best ever. Larry Andersen threw about three billion of them - and that was just in his first stint with the Phillies. Closer Brad Lidge has one of the best in the game today, unique and devastating because of the unusual way it breaks. "Verrrry unusual," said teammate Jamie Moyer, who has earned a Ph.D. in pitching over 22 major-league seasons. In general, the slider is a breaking pitch that moves laterally with a downward tilt as it reaches the hitter.
NEWS
June 19, 2008
MY COMPANION and I totally agree with Liam Tolen, who wrote about "Parking Wheels in the Dugout"! Many times we have to mute the TV because he's so annoying! It would be great if they'd get Larry Andersen back. Like Rich Ashburn always said, "If you don't have anything to say about the game, then don't say anything. " Mildred Units Sellersville
SPORTS
November 2, 2007 | Daily News Staff Report
Legendary Phillies announcer Richie Ashburn is among the names on the preliminary list for consideration for the Ford C. Frick Award, given annually to a broadcaster by the Baseball Hall of Fame. Chris Wheeler, Larry Andersen and former Phils broadcaster Andy Musser are also on the list. The list will be trimmed to a final ballot of 10 by a 20-member committee that includes past winners - Harry Kalas among them. The 10 finalists will be revealed Dec. 4, with the winner announced in February.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
NOW THAT the baseball season is about to begin, I have a complaint to make to the Phillies, Comcast SportsNet, CN8 and WPSG-57 sports concerning Harry Kalas. Do the executives in charge not realize that Harry is the premier broadcaster in baseball today? The way he is treated by them is appalling. Why, after 30 years, is he still shuffled out of the TV booth every three innings? This policy of rotating broadcast teams is ridiculous. It's not something real professional operations do. I regularly watch the Cubs on WGN Chicago and Braves games on TBS. Those stations have broadcast teams that start and finish every game.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|