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Larry Holmes

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SPORTS
September 19, 1986 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
A black and silver stretch limousine took up half a block of parking spaces outside the Montgomery County Courthouse. The shiny Packard was waiting to take Larry Holmes, the commissioner, to Bethlehem, where he would become Larry Holmes, the promoter. Inside, Holmes the commissioner was the leading light on a seven-member panel of Pennsylvania legislators and boxing officials who were taking testimony from the chief boxing regulators in three states. Holmes and the others had summoned the three officials to testify in accordance with Pennsylvania Resolution 36. What K. LeRoy Irvis, speaker of the House, had in mind when the resolution was drafted was a legislative probe into what can be done to enhance boxing safety in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
It is still happening. The good ones are convinced they can fight forever. Old men try to compete against young kids. Inevitably, they learn - the hard way - that the greatest enemy of every athlete is time. A defiant and arrogant former champ, Larry Holmes, is scheduled to step into the ring next month against a powerful champion named "Iron" Mike Tyson. Boxing will undergo another night of grief. Holmes has not fought in nearly two years. He will trade what little respect he has left for a fat payday and an attempt to prove the impossible, that the skills that abandoned him more than three years ago have returned.
SPORTS
July 16, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry Holmes doesn't watch too much boxing anymore. However, the former heavyweight champion and Hall of Famer believes there is a fighter out there who can dislodge the five heavyweight belts that Ukrainian Wladimir Klitschko holds. "He ain't talented; he's just a big guy with some power," said Holmes, 65, who once defended the heavyweight title 20 straight times. "I think the big guy from South Carolina [WBC champion Deontay Wilder] has the size and a decent jab. If he develops it more, I think he can beat him. If he uses his jab and really learns how to step side to side, he can beat him. " Klitschko (64-3, 54 knockouts)
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If there's a mortal anywhere who can beat heavyweight champion Mike Tyson, he'll have to come equipped with an active jab, a sneaky-quick right hand and a light pair of feet - just for starters. Former champ Larry Holmes, who challenges Tyson tonight in Atlantic City, has, in the past, demonstrated all of those prerequisites. But to beat Tyson, a mere mortal would also have to be able to turn a tight left hook behind that sneaky quick right, fire back effectively despite serious rib damage, and work an honest three minutes in each of 12 honest rounds.
NEWS
May 27, 1986
The recommendations made by former heavyweight boxing champ Larry Holmes make a lot of sense. The safety of prize fighters should be the premier concern of all those who enjoy the sport of boxing. All too often boxers are seriously injured because of too-frequent bouts and the promoters' concern for profits instead of the boxers' welfare. If the individual state boxing commissions are not willing to oversee the welfare of fighters, the federal government should pass laws regulating this "industry.
SPORTS
April 8, 1991 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Unlike George Foreman, who insists the old, fat, current version of himself is a better fighter than the younger, sleeker model that held the heavyweight championship years ago, Larry Holmes has no illusions about how he stacks up, at age 41, in comparison with his youthful prime. Soon after Holmes launched his latest comeback with a first-round demolition of Tim "Doc" Anderson last night at the Diplomat Resort and Country Club, Holmes was asked out this year's model would fare against the Holmes who ruled the heavyweight division from 1978 to '85. "I'm old now," Holmes said after a moment of reflection.
SPORTS
July 30, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
For several years now, it has seemed as if former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes has been in a desperate race to stay one jump ahead of Father Time. Based on his plodding performance in last night's controversial, split-decision victory over Maurice Harris at the Theater at Madison Square Garden, it would appear the 47-year-old Holmes is, at best, in a dead heat with the one opponent no aging fighter can indefinitely outrun. "It was a tough, brutal fight," Holmes (66-6, 42 knockouts)
SPORTS
January 20, 1988 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, Daily News Sports Writer
The date was Sept. 12, 1978, and World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Larry Holmes had a few points to make to a group of reporters in a New Orleans hotel lobby. Little did he know that his words on that day would provide an interesting contrast into his emotions as he attempts to regain the heavyweight title nearly 10 years later. Just which statements ring true in 1988 will be known only after Friday night's bout against undisputed champ Mike Tyson in the Atlantic City Convention Hall.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | By Joyce Gemperlein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry Holmes' dangerous hands were heavy with diamonds and rubies as they drooped over the edge of his desk. His pockets and his heart, the former heavyweight boxing champ admitted, are made of gold. "Yeah. I'm rich. How rich? Rich rich. Just say rich rich. Larry Holmes wishes part of his name was Rich, in fact," said Holmes, a seventh-grade dropout. "People all the time tell me I'm lucky. . . . But I tell them . . . you went to college and you can read and write and I don't do that very well, but I'm blessed by God in other ways.
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NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Chris Mondics and Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITERS
It was the October 1980 title fight between Easton's Larry Holmes and Muhammad Ali and the two old friends and competitors were battling not just with their fists, but also their wits. "When I fought him I said, 'You know I love you, man,' " Holmes recalled of the fight that Holmes easily won. "He said, 'If that is so, why are you whuppin' me?' " Holmes was one of only five boxers to ever defeat Ali. Years later, Ali would say that he would not have fought Holmes if he had known he would lose and suffer brain damage.
SPORTS
July 19, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the close of his 20-minute one-man show, former heavyweight champion of the world Larry Holmes had a message. "People say Muhammad Ali was the greatest," Holmes said. "They said that Rocky Marciano was the greatest, and they said that Joe Louis was the greatest. I'm here to tell you that I'm the greatest. " Widely recognized as one of the greatest heavyweights of all time, Holmes, 65, delivered that statement from a ring inside Harrah's Philadelphia Casino, where he was debuting his one-man show in front of about 200 spectators.
SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
"[Family members] are under strict orders to speak up if they think I am not writing well any longer, because at this point I could write the telephone directory and get money for it. " - Author John le Carré, 81, to the New York Times   MUHAMMAD ALI'S last fight was a loss to Trevor Berbick in a 10-round decision. That isn't the one I remember, though. It was the fight before that, against Larry Holmes, that will forever endure. The fight was in 1980, with Ali coming out of retirement to try to beat the champion.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Samantha Marcus, ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
ALLENTOWN - Larry Holmes has been recognized during his lifetime, by the Jaycees and the International Boxing Hall of Fame, with various mayoral citations and keys and honorary degrees. His office, on a street bearing his name, is replete with awards, honors, mementos, and remembrances. The former heavyweight champion isn't wanting for accolades - with the exception, perhaps, of his own hometown, he says. Well, no longer. Holmes, who grew up in public housing on Easton's South Side and dropped out of junior high school, went on to become a champion fighter and millionaire businessman.
SPORTS
March 23, 2005 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's easy - and somewhat accurate - to dismiss Eric "Butterbean" Esch as purely a novelty act. The 370-pound super heavyweight, who fights tomorrow night at the Wachovia Spectrum, travels the country boxing local sluggers in matches that almost never are scheduled for more than four rounds and average less than three. He has fought at the Texas Motor Speedway and in the Playboy Mansion, in dozens of Mississippi River and Indian casinos, and in boxing meccas such as Madison Square Garden, Caesars Palace, and the Blue Horizon.
SPORTS
July 30, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
For several years now, it has seemed as if former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes has been in a desperate race to stay one jump ahead of Father Time. Based on his plodding performance in last night's controversial, split-decision victory over Maurice Harris at the Theater at Madison Square Garden, it would appear the 47-year-old Holmes is, at best, in a dead heat with the one opponent no aging fighter can indefinitely outrun. "It was a tough, brutal fight," Holmes (66-6, 42 knockouts)
SPORTS
June 17, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Larry Holmes ended his 23-year boxing career in style yesterday with an eighth-round knockout of Anthony Willis in his 70th pro fight. Holmes, a 46-year-old grandfather retiring at the insistence of his family, chose a Father's Day bout at Casino Magic in Bay St. Louis, Miss., where he often fought. The former heavyweight champion, from Easton, Pa., delivered a definitive right hand to Willis' temple 1 minute, 13 seconds into Round 8 of the scheduled 10-rounder. It was the 42d knockout for Holmes, who ended his career with a 65-5 record.
SPORTS
April 8, 1995 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The fast lane in Easton, Pa., would be a walking path in New York or Los Angeles or Philadelphia. And that, Larry Holmes said, explains why a 45-year- old grandfather can still punch - and take punches - for a living. "My idea of a hot time is to stay home with my wife and kids," said the former heavyweight champion, who has five children and two grandchildren. "There's not much to do in Easton, but I don't care. I don't have to go to California to keep up with the Joneses.
SPORTS
April 7, 1995 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes became agitated when World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Oliver McCall suggested Holmes had relinquished the WBC title in 1983 because he was afraid to fight top-rated contender Greg Page. Page is now McCall's assistant trainer. The question of Holmes's motivation 12 years ago served to add some much- needed fire to the press conference leading into tomorrow night's pay-per- view matchup, which has generated little heat among fight fans.
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