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Larry Magid

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
PHILADELPHIA music fans have long benefitted from a hyperactive and competitive concert-promotion scene, a high-stakes game with its share of drama and intrigue. Still, 2010 is going down as one for the books. Larry Magid, the area's best-known concert promoter, was finally judged dispensable by the buyers of his business and took his leave from the Live Nation operation in February. Magid refused to disappear quietly into the night, though. Instead, the 67-year-old promoter has come back as a reinvigorated rival, with salutary effects for the Philly nightlife scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Electric Factory Concerts will celebrate its 20th anniversary with a private party at the Franklin Institute tomorrow night, and the people who have become synonymous with Philadelphia rock concerts no doubt will be swapping stories of great moments in rock-and-roll. Larry Magid, who is the rock maestro in the company he runs with Alan and Herb Spivak, has a lot from which to choose. There are concerts by '60s stars such as Jimi Hendrix, Cream and Janis Joplin at the rock-and-roll ballroom that first bore the name Electric Factory; big-time shows by acts such as Bruce Springsteen and the Rolling Stones at JFK and Veterans Stadiums; the start of the Philadelphia Music Foundation last year, and the logistical masterpiece that was 1985's Live Aid. But when Magid, 45, really digs for a seminal moment, he finds himself thinking back to the days when he'd listen to Jocko Henderson's Jocko and the Rocketship show on the radio and watch Mitch Thomas' TV dance show in the late '50s.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city's leading musical entrepreneur testified at a Liquor Control Board hearing yesterday that his proposed music hall and restaurant would not disrupt the Old City neighborhood nearby because he would provide ample security. Larry Magid, president of Electric Factory Concerts, said he planned to hire off-duty police officers to guard residential streets near the proposed site at Third and Callowhill Streets. The proposal has drawn opposition from Old City residents who fear that the club, with a capacity for 5,000 patrons, would bring heavy car and pedestrian traffic through their neighborhood and increase crime and noise.
NEWS
June 26, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Live 8 could have gone anywhere. Larry Magid chose to hold it in Philadelphia. When Bob Geldof called the head of Electric Factory Concerts in May, the crusading rocker had a scheme grandiose enough to dwarf even the benefits for Ethiopian famine relief that Magid had helped him pull off in July 1985. Magid has always considered Live Aid, whose Philadelphia show at the old JFK Stadium he co-promoted, "the best thing that I ever did. It was almost the perfect show. Both in what it stood for, and how it came off. " But this time, to call attention to suffering in debt-ridden African nations before the July 6 start of the G-8 summit in Scotland, Geldof had something bigger in mind: eight concerts - one in each of the capital cities of the world's richest nations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2011
Just the Fact(ory) Were you part of the groovy, late '60s scene at the original Electric Factory rock club at 22nd and Arch streets? Or plunked down $4 for one of the Factory's formative years, triple-bill rock extravaganzas at the Spectrum? If so, rush to the computer and send us your memories and images, for possibly inclusion in our Wednesday send-off of Larry Magid's glossy book "My Soul's Been Psychedelicized - Electric Factory - Four Decades in Posters and Photographs. " Send pictures or photos to factory@ phillynews.com.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Nick Vadala and Molly Eichel, STAFF WRITERS
Lee Andrews, 79, of Sharon Hill, the former leader of Lee Andrews and the Hearts and the father of Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, drummer for the Roots, died Wednesday, March 16. Mr. Andrews, born Arthur Lee Andrew Thompson in Goldsboro, N.C., in 1936, came from a performing family. His father, Beechie Thompson, was a member of the Dixie Hummingbirds. When Mr. Andrews was young, the Thompsons moved to Philadelphia, where he would form with the Dreamers, his first musical group, at Bartram High School.
NEWS
October 26, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The stories that promoter Larry Magid has collected over four decades could fill a book. Magid, one of the creators of Electric Factory Concerts, indeed has a book due in April, but don't expect juicy stuff. "What am I going to tell?" Magid says. In the coffee-table tome My Soul's Been Psychedelicized - borrowing a Chambers Brothers lyric - Magid teams with Philly Mag's Robert Huber in compiling posters and photos taken at the original Electric Factory, Bijou Cafe, Spectrum, Tower Theater, and the second Electric Factory.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
If all the world's a stage, why can't shows from Broadway, London, and even Philadelphia be playing on it, simultaneously? That's the billion-dollar question the fairly new online video service BroadwayHD is testing Thursday night, as it offers up the first-ever live stream of a Broadway show, the musical revival She Loves Me. And in the process, the start-up hopes to cement its status as the "Netflix of Broadway. " Well-reviewed and nearing the end of its run at Studio 54, this internet treat features a top-notch score by Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock (of Fiddler on the Roof fame)
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca and Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Larry Magid, the music-industry titan who cofounded Electric Factory Concerts in 1968 and brought the mammoth Live Aid and Live 8 concerts to Philadelphia, has stepped down from his position as chairman of the regional branch of the Live Nation concert-promotion empire. Neither Magid nor anyone from Live Nation would comment. A spokesman at Live Nation's Bala Cynwyd offices yesterday confirmed a report of Magid's departure posted Tuesday on Billboard.com. Live Nation Philadelphia books most of the large venues in this market, including the Wachovia Center, the Susquehanna Bank Center in Camden, and the Electric Factory.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
PART of what makes "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," the Fox remake of the PBS classic, cool is the mind-blowing science. The other part? The insane visuals, which are thanks to Ambler's Kara Vallow , a Germantown Friends grad who developed and produced the animation on "Cosmos. " "I'm a very proud Philadelphian and no one understands why," Vallow said. Vallow has been the producing partner of Seth MacFarlane for more than a decade, working on "Family Guy," "American Dad!"
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
If all the world's a stage, why can't shows from Broadway, London, and even Philadelphia be playing on it, simultaneously? That's the billion-dollar question the fairly new online video service BroadwayHD is testing Thursday night, as it offers up the first-ever live stream of a Broadway show, the musical revival She Loves Me. And in the process, the start-up hopes to cement its status as the "Netflix of Broadway. " Well-reviewed and nearing the end of its run at Studio 54, this internet treat features a top-notch score by Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock (of Fiddler on the Roof fame)
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Nick Vadala and Molly Eichel, STAFF WRITERS
Lee Andrews, 79, of Sharon Hill, the former leader of Lee Andrews and the Hearts and the father of Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, drummer for the Roots, died Wednesday, March 16. Mr. Andrews, born Arthur Lee Andrew Thompson in Goldsboro, N.C., in 1936, came from a performing family. His father, Beechie Thompson, was a member of the Dixie Hummingbirds. When Mr. Andrews was young, the Thompsons moved to Philadelphia, where he would form with the Dreamers, his first musical group, at Bartram High School.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE OWNERS of the historic Lit Brothers Department Store building on Market Street between 7th and 8th could barely hide their excitement when they announced that the building would be "lit up" with rooftop LED advertising Jan. 20. Their news release was sprinkled with adjectives like cinematic and spectacular . "The twin giant LED displays mark a pivotal point in the revitalization of Market Street East and bring the first ad-friendly, digital-motion...
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
PART of what makes "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," the Fox remake of the PBS classic, cool is the mind-blowing science. The other part? The insane visuals, which are thanks to Ambler's Kara Vallow , a Germantown Friends grad who developed and produced the animation on "Cosmos. " "I'm a very proud Philadelphian and no one understands why," Vallow said. Vallow has been the producing partner of Seth MacFarlane for more than a decade, working on "Family Guy," "American Dad!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Before he became the legendary music promoter who helped shape the concert industry over a four-decade career, Larry Magid was a 12-year-old doo-wop fan in West Philly, infected with the music bug by a song called "Sh-Boom. " The 1954 hit by the African American rhythm-and-blues group the Chords "had this refrain, 'Sh-boom, Sh-boom,' " Magid, 68, recalls fondly as he sits in his gold-record-lined office at the Piazza at Schmidts in Northern Liberties. "It made no sense, but it was something so different, so new. And you felt a connection to the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
Ever wonder if this town is big enough to support another big concert venue, let alone two? Pretty soon, we'll know the answer. The Bowery Presents, a New York-based concert promoter and club operator run by (among others) former Live Nation exec Jim Glancy, has taken a long-term lease on the big building at 1026 Spring Garden St., the former Spaghetti Warehouse. If all goes well with their Liquor Control Board application, BP will open a new rock club on the site in the fall. There's also a huge, 3,000-capacity House of Blues entertainment venue coming to the waterfront area, near the SugarHouse Casino.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
THEY SAY if you were really there, basking in the DayGlo colors and smoky haze of the hippie era, you probably don't remember it. Yet veteran concert promoter Larry Magid is still around to prove them wrong, with an entertaining new book called "My Soul's Been Psychedelicized: Electric Factory Four Decades in Posters and Photographs. " Published by Temple Press and landing in stores today ($39.50), this large-format, profusely illustrated trip down memory lane aims to set the record straight about the dawning of the countercultural revolution in our town, with a special focus on all the great talent that grew up in the period.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2011
Just the Fact(ory) Were you part of the groovy, late '60s scene at the original Electric Factory rock club at 22nd and Arch streets? Or plunked down $4 for one of the Factory's formative years, triple-bill rock extravaganzas at the Spectrum? If so, rush to the computer and send us your memories and images, for possibly inclusion in our Wednesday send-off of Larry Magid's glossy book "My Soul's Been Psychedelicized - Electric Factory - Four Decades in Posters and Photographs. " Send pictures or photos to factory@ phillynews.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
PHILADELPHIA music fans have long benefitted from a hyperactive and competitive concert-promotion scene, a high-stakes game with its share of drama and intrigue. Still, 2010 is going down as one for the books. Larry Magid, the area's best-known concert promoter, was finally judged dispensable by the buyers of his business and took his leave from the Live Nation operation in February. Magid refused to disappear quietly into the night, though. Instead, the 67-year-old promoter has come back as a reinvigorated rival, with salutary effects for the Philly nightlife scene.
NEWS
October 26, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The stories that promoter Larry Magid has collected over four decades could fill a book. Magid, one of the creators of Electric Factory Concerts, indeed has a book due in April, but don't expect juicy stuff. "What am I going to tell?" Magid says. In the coffee-table tome My Soul's Been Psychedelicized - borrowing a Chambers Brothers lyric - Magid teams with Philly Mag's Robert Huber in compiling posters and photos taken at the original Electric Factory, Bijou Cafe, Spectrum, Tower Theater, and the second Electric Factory.
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