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BUSINESS
April 28, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Google chief executive Larry Page recently wrote that he hoped to show that the company was "deserving of great love. " But the Internet search leader may need to win more trust, based on the suspicions swirling around Google Drive, a new online storage service for personal documents, photos, and other content. Within a few hours of Google Drive's Tuesday debut, technology blogs and Twitter users were pouncing on a legal clause in the "terms of service" that could be interpreted to mean that any content stored in Google Drive would automatically become Google Inc.'s intellectual property.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2012 | By Gabriele Steinhauser, Associated Press
BRUSSELS - The European Union's data protection authorities have asked Google to delay the rollout of its new privacy policy until they have verified that it doesn't break the bloc's laws. Google publicized its new privacy rules - which regulate how the Web giant uses the enormous amounts of personal data it collects through its search engine, e-mail and other services - with much fanfare last week. Since then, it has launched a huge publicity campaign informing its users around the globe of the new policy, which is set to come into force on March 1. But that launch date may now be under threat.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. is opening a virtual window into the secretive data centers where an intricate maze of computers process Internet search requests, show YouTube video clips, and distribute e-mail for millions of people. The unprecedented peek is being provided through a new website unveiled Wednesday at http://tinyurl.com/bnbcy8j . The site features photos from inside some of the eight data centers that Google already has running in the United States, Finland, and Belgium.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a bumpy ride, but when Google Inc. finally made it to the stock market last week, investors cast aside doubts and drove the company's shares up 26 percent in the first two days of trading. After being priced at $85 a share Wednesday night - far below the company's initial projection of $108 to $135 a share - the stock opened at $100.01 on Thursday and shot up to close at $108.31 Friday in Nasdaq trading. Analysts said the problems that had plagued Google since it applied to become a publicly traded company in April had vanished - at least temporarily - in the minds of investors once the stock actually began trading: It jumped 18 percent above its IPO price on its very first trade.
NEWS
February 4, 2006
Google looks out for Google. That's probably the best explanation for the Internet search giant's apparently contradictory behavior in two recent dust-ups with national governments. On the one hand, Google is fending off a U.S. Justice Department request to see Google's indexes of Web sites and all the search terms that Googlers type in. The Feds want the information to buttress a defense of a federal Internet pornography law that had been overturned by an appeals court. At issue is the effectiveness of commercial software filters designed to shield innocent eyes from scandalous sites.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Google Inc. executives provided investment analysts with a bright outlook yesterday in a display of confidence that appeared aimed at defusing concerns about the company's growth. Chief executive officer Eric Schmidt said he saw no limit to the Internet search engine's ability to develop better advertising formulas, in turn generating more of the commissions that account for most of its profit. Schmidt underscored his optimism at one point by saying Google someday might reach $100 billion in annual revenue as it expanded into a variety of new advertising channels, including television, radio and publishing.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2013 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google's stock price topped $800 Tuesday for the first time amid renewed confidence in the company's ability to reap higher profits from its dominance of Internet search and prominence in the growing mobile market. The milestone comes more than five years after Google's shares initially hit $700. Not long after breaking that barrier in October 2007, the economy collapsed into the worst recession since World War II and Google's stock tumbled into a prolonged malaise that eventually led to a change in leadership.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - Amid the free food and other goodies that come with a job at Google Inc., there's a benefit a lot of employees don't qualify for: a cluster of high-tech workshops that have become a tinkerer's paradise. Workers escape from their computer screens and office chairs to weld, drill, and saw on expensive machinery they won't find at Home Depot. Besides building contraptions with a clear business purpose, Google employees use the shops for fun: They create elaborate holiday decorations, build cabinets for their homes, and sometimes dream big - such as the engineers working on a pedal-powered airplane with a 100-foot wingspan.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Having grown too large to remain private under the law, Google, the search engine company, filed an initial public offering on Saturday. Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Google's founders, preface their filing with a document titled "Letter from the Founders: An Owner's Manual for Google's Shareholders. " It's a remarkable piece, warning of a long, strange trip ahead, and also warning investors to be in for the long haul or not get in at all. The letter, excerpted below, shows that Google is pretty reluctant to do it Wall Street's way. Google is not a conventional company.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of online search company Google Inc. rose 18 percent to close at $100.34 yesterday, a first-day "pop" that still left questions about whether the company's initial public offering could be considered a success. The closing price was "still lower than the original IPO price" that Google had initially predicted, noted John Tinker, managing director of ThinkEquity Partners L.L.C., a research and investment-banking company in San Francisco. "If it's not a failure, it clearly didn't work the way Google's management intended it," said Barry Randall, portfolio manager for the First American Technology Fund.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2013 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google's stock price topped $800 Tuesday for the first time amid renewed confidence in the company's ability to reap higher profits from its dominance of Internet search and prominence in the growing mobile market. The milestone comes more than five years after Google's shares initially hit $700. Not long after breaking that barrier in October 2007, the economy collapsed into the worst recession since World War II and Google's stock tumbled into a prolonged malaise that eventually led to a change in leadership.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. is opening a virtual window into the secretive data centers where an intricate maze of computers process Internet search requests, show YouTube video clips, and distribute e-mail for millions of people. The unprecedented peek is being provided through a new website unveiled Wednesday at http://tinyurl.com/bnbcy8j . The site features photos from inside some of the eight data centers that Google already has running in the United States, Finland, and Belgium.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
By Edward Glaeser 'We built it. " That was the Republicans' rebuke during their convention to President Obama's "you didn't build that. " These phrases don't imply anything about concrete policy. Yet the debate reflects a deep ideological divide that goes back 150 years. And the battle over the relative roles of social collaboration and individual initiative is not limited to the United States. The president's defenders claim Republicans took his words out of context. But the transcript shows that Obama's comments, taken as a whole, are a coherent statement of a communitarian worldview that emphasizes the power of social influences and the positive role of government.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Google chief executive Larry Page recently wrote that he hoped to show that the company was "deserving of great love. " But the Internet search leader may need to win more trust, based on the suspicions swirling around Google Drive, a new online storage service for personal documents, photos, and other content. Within a few hours of Google Drive's Tuesday debut, technology blogs and Twitter users were pouncing on a legal clause in the "terms of service" that could be interpreted to mean that any content stored in Google Drive would automatically become Google Inc.'s intellectual property.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2012 | By Gabriele Steinhauser, Associated Press
BRUSSELS - The European Union's data protection authorities have asked Google to delay the rollout of its new privacy policy until they have verified that it doesn't break the bloc's laws. Google publicized its new privacy rules - which regulate how the Web giant uses the enormous amounts of personal data it collects through its search engine, e-mail and other services - with much fanfare last week. Since then, it has launched a huge publicity campaign informing its users around the globe of the new policy, which is set to come into force on March 1. But that launch date may now be under threat.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Energy Plus Holdings L.L.C. , the University City-based energy retailer founded four years ago by Center City ex-credit-card-marketeer Richard W. Vague , has accepted a $190 million cash offer from NRG Energy Inc. , of Princeton. Energy Plus employs more than 150, including Penn and Drexel student telemarketers, at its headquarters on the top floor of the University City Science Center's new 3711 Market St. office building. NRG chief executive David Crane said Vague and chief operating officer Kevin Kleinschmidt were the rare energy executives who could turn the "boring" business of power sales into "a hotbed of entrepreneurial activity.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google already makes the Android software that powers the country's most commonly owned type of smartphone. The announcement that it plans to buy Motorola Mobility, a leading U.S. handset developer, sets the stage for a head-to-head contest with Apple, which makes the Android's more profitable and highly touted competitor, the iPhone. The $12.5 billion deal, approved by both companies' boards, still must clear an antitrust review. But industry analysts and other observers of the exploding smartphone market quickly portrayed the purchase as a potential game-changer.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google Inc.'s $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility Inc. would make the online search and advertising giant the owner, not just of Illinois-based Motorola's money-losing mobile-phone factories, but also of Motorola's vast phone-patent portfolio - and its profitable, Horsham-based video-equipment arm, which counts Comcast and other TV giants among its clients. This "defensive" deal, which follows Google's failure to win Nortel Corp.'s smartphone patents in bidding against Microsoft and Apple last month, is "entirely driven by the patent portfolio," Jordan Rohan , analyst at Stifel Nicolaus & Co. , told clients in a report.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - Amid the free food and other goodies that come with a job at Google Inc., there's a benefit a lot of employees don't qualify for: a cluster of high-tech workshops that have become a tinkerer's paradise. Workers escape from their computer screens and office chairs to weld, drill, and saw on expensive machinery they won't find at Home Depot. Besides building contraptions with a clear business purpose, Google employees use the shops for fun: They create elaborate holiday decorations, build cabinets for their homes, and sometimes dream big - such as the engineers working on a pedal-powered airplane with a 100-foot wingspan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2011
THE GIZMO: Digging "In the Plex," Steven Levy's new book on "How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives" (Simon & Schuster, $26). MAGIC MAKERS: The wizards of Silicon Valley often hype their hardware/software breakthroughs as "magical" for the products' ability to pull off dazzling stunts in the blink of an eye. And true to the magicians' code, these tech talents rarely let mere mortals peer behind the curtains. That's what makes Levy's just-out tome so valuable.
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