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NEWS
May 10, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services Daily News staff writer Renee Lucas Wayne contributed to this report
The latest solution to chronic snoring that doesn't respond to other treatments is surgery. But laser-assisted uvulo-palatoplasty isn't as drastic as its name sounds. The laser operation "is like a facelift for the back of the throat," said Dr. Marvin Fried of Boston, chairman of the laser committee for the American Academy of Otolaryngology. In Philadelphia, doctors at Pennsylvania Hospital and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, among others, are using the procedure. Of the 50 patients treated at Pennsylvania Hospital, according to otolaryngologist Dr. Marc Rosen, 85 percent have been cured by this surgery.
SPORTS
March 29, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Greg Maddux has told the Atlanta Braves he would like to undergo corrective laser eye surgery so he would no longer have to wear contact lenses. "He's been talking about it since he got down here," manager Bobby Cox said yesterday. "I don't know if he'll have it. " Maddux, who wears contact lenses when pitching and small, wire-rimmed glasses off the field, has said if he had the surgery he probably wouldn't even miss a start. "It's no big deal," Maddux told the Orlando Sentinel.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | by Dr. Ralph Cash, Special to the Daily News
Q: My son has warts on the bottom of his foot. He has been treated with chemicals and freezing without success. The doctor wants to use a laser to cut them out. Is it safe? A: Warts on the sole of the foot are called plantar warts and are often difficult to cure. Warts caused by a virus can appear anywhere on the body but are especially painful on the sole of the foot. They can be differentiated from a simple callus by the pain elicited by squeezing them. Slow growing, warts usually disappear without any treatment over a period of six months to two years, but can often spread if picked at. They can be treated by local application of acids (most commonly made from aspirin)
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon is designing a portable laser that will enable U.S. troops to temporarily blind enemy soldiers and their growing arsenal of light-sensitive weapons, according to congressional testimony. The first-of-its-kind program, dubbed "Dazer" by Army officials, is designed to "flash-blind" enemy troops and render the growing number of light-intensifying battlefield sensors temporarily inoperative, an Army spokesman said. "It's not a lethal weapon - it's not going to blind a person permanently," said the spokesman, Maj. Richard Bridges.
NEWS
March 7, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Levis is a bandleader of sorts. His instruments are lasers. And his goal is to make molecules dance. At Temple University, Levis shoots high-energy, ultra-fast lasers to break apart molecules and sometimes recombine them into new forms not found in nature. Among the possibilities: new drugs, ultra-small computer circuitry, and movies that can actually show the movement of subatomic particles. Levis, 42, head of Temple's chemistry department, is one of a handful of scientists using finely tuned lasers to tweak the very building blocks of matter.
NEWS
December 12, 1986 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
It's light-up time on the Parkway at 8 tonight as developer Willard Rouse 3rd salutes the almost-completion of One Liberty Place with a laser and fireworks show. The 13-minute show, staged from Eakins Oval at the base of the Art Museum steps, will be choreographed to George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue. " Laser beams will bounce off reflecting plates on the 58th floor of the city's tallest skyscraper, under construction at 17th and Market streets. The city has decided the show will be a traffic-stopper.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SOMETHING'S amiss, something's awry. Elton John's specs are no longer, thanks to his eyes. John, who has used part of his performance earnings to accumulate eyewear, says he plans to have laser surgery in February so that he won't need to use his 4,000 eyepieces. "I'm so fed up with 'Where are they?' I can't see anything, so why wait?" he said yesterday in a televised interview. How could he miss eyeglasses with flashing lights? Or mini-wipers and sun visors? How, we ask!
NEWS
May 13, 2011
A former Edison High School student with no previous criminal record has been ordered to spend a year and a half in federal prison for pointing a green laser light into the cockpit of a city police helicopter in October 2008. It was unclear whether Lenny Tavarez, 22, of Philadelphia, knew that it was a police helicopter or that the laser could cause a crash. Police Lt. Anthony Ginaldi said he was temporarily blinded and lost control of the aircraft until colleague Chris Clemens took control as they flew over a city neighborhood.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Zulli's 1987 bypass surgery cleared up the pain that shot through his left leg whenever he walked - but not before it knocked him out of action for a while. He spent 14 days in the hospital and another three weeks recuperating at home before resuming normal activities, and he had to put himself through the strain of a three-hour operation, general anesthesia and post-operative pain. But on Tuesday, just four days after having the same sort of artery blockage corrected in his right leg, Zulli was headed home to Fox Chase from Metropolitan Hospital-Parkview.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1988 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
CEP Industries Inc., a Gloucester Township company that develops and markets video laser-technology products, has filed for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. In its petition filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Camden, the company listed assets of $295,000 and liabilities of $6 million. CEP's largest creditors are Momentum Manufacturing of Herkimer, N.Y., which is owed $3.12 million, and Vidmar Inc. of Blackwood, which is owed $1.4 million.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rubber bands snapping really hard - painfully hard - against the skin. That's what laser treatment feels like to Marianne Morrison, who is getting three of her tattoos removed, including a large iris on the right side of her neck. It hurts more than getting a tattoo done in the first place, said Morrison, 40, of Germantown. If only she'd listened to her husband, local tattoo artist Eric Eaton, who grudgingly did the ink she's trying to erase. But the bartender wants to take the edge off her appearance and look more professional before starting nursing school.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AIMING TO crack down on losers who point lasers at aircraft, the FBI announced yesterday they'll give rewards of up to $10,000 for tips leading to the arrest of illegal laser pointers. Such incidents have skyrocketed 1,100 percent since 2005, when the FBI and Federal Aviation Administration began tracking the deliberate targeting of aircraft by people with handheld lasers. In 2013, 3,960 laser strikes were reported, averaging almost 11 incidents a day, according to the FBI. The FBI's regional reward program will run for 60 days in 12 FBI field offices, including Philadelphia's.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
DJS Associates Inc., a 25-employee Abington firm that laser-scans accident scenes and building collapses for insurers and plaintiffs' lawyers, is stepping up its game. A four-person DJS crew will begin Monday the giant task of laser-scanning the Lincoln Memorial. The eventual three-dimensional digital image - the merging of 400 individual scans - will be accurate to within a quarter-inch of the physical monument in Washington, the firm says. The pro bono project is being done in conjunction with the National Park Service and the nonprofit organization CyArk, based in Oakland, Calif.
SPORTS
July 11, 2013
Wednesday at 7 p.m., Villanova Pavilion In their home opener, the Freedoms will host Springfield, featuring former world No. 1 Andy Roddick, now retired from the ATP tour. The Freedoms' Samuel Groth hit the fastest serve on record, 163.4 m.p.h., in the 2012 ATP Challenger in Busan, South Korea. Lasers: Roddick, Rik De Voest, Vania King, Alisa Kleybanova, Jean-Julien Rojer. Freedoms: Groth, Liezel Huber, Jordan Kerr, Maria Sanchez. Tickets: $15 to $75. Call 866-988-8497 or go to freedomstix.ticketfly.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Martha Waggoner, Associated Press
DURHAM, N.C. - A Duke University professor who developed a laser to study melanoma has discovered a new use for the system: uncovering what's underneath artwork without damaging the pieces. Warren S. Warren was at the National Gallery in London, looking at an exhibit on art forgeries, when he realized that the art world used imaging technologies that were 30 or 40 years old. So he began investigating whether lasers could be used to uncover the mysteries underneath layers of paint without damaging the art. So far, the answer is a qualified yes. Warren and others in Duke's Center for Molecular and Biomedical Imaging, which he heads, have discovered they can use Warren's pump-probe laser to create three-dimensional cross-sections of art that let researchers see colors and layers and maybe, at some point, discover the source of materials.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
By Jayson Dupre Though cosmetic laser procedures are widely practiced in today's medical spas, there are significant safety concerns that require more attention and oversight of these techniques at the regulatory level. With the exception of minimal training offered by laser manufacturers, the laser industry generally operates without government regulation or oversight. As a result, incorrect use of cosmetic lasers has resulted in patient injury, including severe scarring and burning - and has demonstrated the need for standardized, industry-wide regulations to address patient safety concerns, increase consumer confidence, and facilitate the continued growth of the $8 billion medical-aesthetics industry.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
WHAT MAY have appeared to be fun and games to Daniel F. Dangler on July 18 - shining a green laser beam at a news helicopter - was a federal crime, which has landed the Philadelphia man in jail. Dangler, 30, of Torresdale Avenue near Robbins Street, was sentenced this week to three months in jail followed by seven months of home confinement. Dangler, an unemployed high-school dropout with convictions for burglary, driving under the influence and marijuana possession, pleaded guilty Oct. 27. The Federal Aviation Administration also has a civil case pending against Dangler in which he could be fined up to $11,000.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
A Philadelphia man was sentenced Wednesday to three months in jail for aiming a laser beam at a news helicopter last summer, prosecutors said. Daniel F. Dangler, 30, initially denied the charge but then confessed to FBI agents that he flashed a green beam toward the Fox29 helicopter on July 18, according to the office of U.S. Attorney Zane D. Memeger. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova also ordered Dangler to serve three years of supervised release. He also faces up to $11,000 in fines from the Federal Aviation Administration, prosecutors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Tiësto comes to town, it's not just a concert: it's an event. On Saturday night, nearly 5,000 electronic dance music enthusiasts and casual fans descended on the Liacouras Center at Temple University to see the world-famous Dutch artist. The highest-paid DJ in the world (an estimated $22 million in 2012) with a less-impressive presence on the charts, Tiësto proved once again that the live component is essential to his sound. Smoke and a thumping bass greeted concert-goers in the lobby, along with a thorough frisk from security checking for a laundry list of prohibited items that included laser pointers and glow sticks.
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