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Lassie

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NEWS
September 3, 2009
NOW THAT the Michael Vick controversy has died down, I want to know where in our Constitution or Bill of Rights it says that dogs are included. I don't think the Founding Fathers were thinking about Lassie in the big scheme of things. How is it possible that someone can serve more time in prison for abusing a poop machine than for murdering a fellow human being? Do you know who put dogs above human beings? The world's favorite whipping boy, Adolf Hitler. What about the rat or the shark?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | By Colleen Hartry, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer wire services contributed to this report
Legend: A story from the past, believed by many, that is rich in marvelous deeds performed by a hero. In a word, Lassie. For more than 50 years, Lassie has made millions of people around the globe believe. This summer, Paramount Pictures is giving it another go with a new, big-screen Lassie. Director Daniel Petrie says he was pleasantly surprised by the "charm, sweetness and intelligence" of his wanting-to-please canine star. Not so Bob Weatherwax, Lassie's trainer. Weatherwax is son of the late Rudd Weatherwax, owner-trainer of the collie star of Lassie Come Home, the 1943 Elizabeth Taylor-Roddy McDowall film that started it all. He's come to expect the sensitivity and sweetness of collies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1986 | By BRUSE CHADWICK, New York Daily News
Lassie is coming home again. Yes, folks, it's true. The world's most beloved collie will return to television, probably in January, in a new syndicated series sponsored by a major pet food company. Tom McDermott, president of Southbrook Ltd., which owns the rights to "Lassie," says his company definitely will produce a new "Lassie" series. The new plots, he said, would involve a family, living in a rural setting, with a small boy and, of course, Lassie. (The current canine performer is trained by Bob Weatherwax, son of Rudd Weatherwax, the trainer of all the other Lassies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the latest saga involving America's favorite collie, Lassie herds sheep, kills a murderous coyote, practices family therapy without a license, gets Dad a new career and reconciles Stepson and Stepmom. Heck, this dog does everything but windows. Kids, who know too intimately the physical and mental limitations of grown- ups, will be entranced by these superhuman feats. But Lassie may be the first family film that's too intense for adults. Imagine the inadequacy most grown-ups will feel in the face of a family pet who's brainier than Al Gore, a wiser parent than Bill Cosby and who has better hair than Fabio.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 200 people got up early yesterday to have breakfast with a dog. Another 200 were expected to do the same thing today. Obviously, not with just any dog. This was breakfast with Lassie. Every kid's dream dog. Star of screen and television. A male collie who plays a Tootsie role by becoming a female in the movies. Lassie, who travels in regular seats in airplanes and rides in a limousine. Lassie, who had his own reserved elevator for appearances at Strawbridge & Clothier stores yesterday.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The door of the Rittenhouse Hotel opens and a collie pads onto the cool tan marble floor, past the polished brass and blond wood veneer, up the stairs, and onto an elevator that will take him up to his suite. The collie is Lassie, the star of a recent movie now on a 13-city tour plugging a line of OshKosh B'Gosh children's merchandise. Although Lassie may not come to Philadelphia every day, the Rittenhouse Hotel hosts dogs all the time. Some live in the Rittenhouse's condominiums, said Lucia Pernot, the front-office manager.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The enduring appeal of Lassie lies in the fact she's a shining ideal of what dogs should be, instead of what they are. For those of us who've known dogs that vomit on carpeting, roll in their own droppings, maul the paperboy, do rude things to house guests and bring dead animals into the living room, Lassie is an escapist fantasy. Lassie is having an off day if she does not contain a forest fire or pull a lost infant from the jaws of a ravenous bear. The versatile Lassie can also serve as lifeguard, paramedic, bodyguard, au pair and home security system.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
I'LL TAKE ROMANCE: Survey results in the gay-oriented magazine The Advocate provide more evidence that life and love are changing in the age of AIDS. According to the survey, released yesterday, gay men are more interested in romance and long-term relationships than in sex. In fact, 80 percent of the gay and bisexual men who responded to the survey said they'd rather live without sex than without love. ARE THESE THE DOG DAYS? Lassie is certainly the dog of the hour. You can read a tribute to her in Esquire's annual "Women We Love" issue, penned by William Wegman, noted photographer of Weimaraners.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
For those who like their ballet with three lumps of sugar and lots of cream, "Coppelia," which the Pennsylvania Ballet opened last night at the Shubert Theater, is just the cup of tea. This is a sweet bit of nonsense about a village lad and lassie whose love is tested by, of all things, a beautiful doll. The lad in question sees the doll, called Coppelia, in a toy shop window and mistakenly thinks she is the real thing. After numerous comic misunderstandings, the lad discovers his error and marries the lassie and the whole village celebrates.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | BY MICHAEL LACING
From Michael Lacing: Just a few of the things Manuel Noriega has accomplished while in federal prison in Miami Cried real tears for first time after viewing old Lassie episode on Family Channel. Became lead singer of prison rhythm and blues band, Manny and the Jets. Elected president of General Hospital Fan Club, Southern Florida chapter. Drew long lines outside his cell every morning for a cup of his strong Colombian coffee. Can now bench-press 350 pounds and confidently call himself a real Panamanian strongman.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
'I'll call him" was Comcast Corp. CEO Brian Roberts' response in April when told that DreamWorks head Jeffrey Katzenberg could be negotiating to take his animation movie studio private with the help of a Chinese investor. Thus began whirlwind negotiations on April 13 as Roberts in Philadelphia reached Katzenberg on his mobile phone while driving from a Hollywood lunch with director Steven Spielberg. "We know how to do this," Roberts recalled saying on the phone, adding that Comcast wanted to buy the studio.
FOOD
August 18, 2016
Makes 1 serving 3 small dill sprigs 2 slices peeled English (seedless) cucumber, plus 1 long strip of peel for garnish Ice cubes 1 ounce absinthe (may substitute pastis) 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice 1/2 ounce simple syrup (see note) Scant 1/4 cup plain whole-milk yogurt 1. Muddle 2 sprigs of the dill and the cucumber slices in a cocktail shaker. 2. Fill the shaker halfway with ice, then add the absinthe, lime juice, simple syrup, and yogurt; seal and shake vigorously for 30 seconds, then double-strain into a large coupe or tumbler.
FOOD
April 15, 2016
Makes 1 cocktail    1 ounce (30 ml) absinthe 1/2 ounce (15 ml) fresh lime juice 1/2 ounce (15 ml) simple syrup 2 ounces (60 ml) yogurt 3 small dill sprigs, separated 2 slices of English cucumber, peeled Cucumber peel, to garnish Cucumber blossom, to garnish (if possible) In a shaker, muddle 2 sprigs of dill and the cucumber. Add the remaining ingredients with ice, and shake, then double strain. To garnish, roll a long cucumber peel into a scroll and stick it with a sprig of dill.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
Every dog has his day. And even though Seamus the dog has been dead for several decades, his day is now. And that's not good news for Mitt Romney, who continues to be dogged by the true-life tale of how he crated and strapped Seamus to the car roof for a 12-hour family trip way back in the first term of Ronald Reagan's tenure. You probably know the rest of the story. Seamus made poopy, it ran down the window, the kids yelled "Dad, gross!" Dad detoured to a gas station, hosed everything down, reinstalled Seamus on the roof, and hit the road again.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Jill Lawless and Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
How do you sum up the work of songwriter Robert B. Sherman? Try one word: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The tongue-twisting term, sung by the magical nanny Mary Poppins, is like much of Sherman's work - both complex and instantly memorable for child and adult alike. Mr. Sherman, who died in London on Monday at 86, was half of a sibling partnership that put songs into the mouths of nannies and Cockney chimney sweeps, jungle animals and Parisian felines.
NEWS
June 17, 2011
SO letter-writer Karen Morrissey thinks there's a doggy heaven. I guess she also thinks there's a doggy hell. And I guess Cujo is burning for all eternity, while Lassie is spending the rest of her days in paradise. If what Morrissey thinks is correct, there must be a code of conduct for Scooby Doo and his cohorts, a Ten Commandments to abide by. For example: Thou shalt not lick thyself. Miss Morrissey, they were Michael Vick's dogs, and he can do what he wants with them. He shouldn't have served a day in jail, but thanks to our pathetic system, he did. Mike Franklin, Marlton, N.J.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | Inquirer
Here's a list of Elizabeth Taylor movies. Asterisks mark her 10 "essential" films, as selected by Inquirer film critic Carrie Rickey. There's One Born Every Minute (1942) Lassie Come Home (1943) Jane Eyre (1944) The White Cliffs of Dover (1944) National Velvet (1944) Courage of Lassie (1946) Cynthia (1947) Life With Father (1947) A Date With Judy (1948) Julia Misbehaves (1948)
NEWS
September 3, 2009
NOW THAT the Michael Vick controversy has died down, I want to know where in our Constitution or Bill of Rights it says that dogs are included. I don't think the Founding Fathers were thinking about Lassie in the big scheme of things. How is it possible that someone can serve more time in prison for abusing a poop machine than for murdering a fellow human being? Do you know who put dogs above human beings? The world's favorite whipping boy, Adolf Hitler. What about the rat or the shark?
NEWS
May 4, 2002 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony DeSanctis and Lynda Hurley Pritchard got married in 1991. Three years later, they adopted Barney, a 2-year-old, and brought him into their Chester County household. In 1996, the couple separated. The parting was acrimonious and the testiest issue was how the two would divide time spent with Barney. Barney, the golden retriever/golden Labrador dog adopted from the SPCA. For a while, they worked it out. But when Pritchard remarried and moved to Bucks County last year, DeSanctis did not see Barney anymore.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | By Dave Barry
TODAY'S TOPIC FOR HOMEOWNERS: How to install a tile floor. Any decorator will tell you that there is nothing quite like a tile floor for transforming an ordinary room into an ordinary room that has tile on the floor. But if you're like most homeowners, you think that laying tile is a job for the "pros. " But the truth is that anybody can do it! All it takes is a little planning, the right materials and a Fire Rescue unit. Consider the true story of a woman in Linthicum, Md., who decided to tile her kitchen floor, as reported in an excellent front-page article written by Eric Collins for the Sept.
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