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Latin America

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NEWS
November 20, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
With the exception of pre-Columbian artifacts and the Mexican muralists, the art of Central and South America hasn't made much of an impression on North Americans. They have traditionally looked across the Atlantic to the art of Europe, the fountainhead of high culture for the United States. The only time American artists looked south of the Rio Grande was in the 1920s and '30s, when the Mexican mural movement was ascendant. Many American artists were then turning away from European modernism toward a style that reflected homespun American values.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In 1983's Under Fire, Nick Nolte is a combat photographer in Nicaragua who accepts suicidal risks as part of the job and a man who is equally adamant about maintaining his objectivity. "I don't take sides," he explains. "I take pictures. " Oliver Stone's Salvador, a wild roller-coaster of a film currently playing at the Ritz Five, adds graphic pictures of the chaos and carnage in Latin America to the images already provided by a collection of 1980s movies. And just as Nolte is eventually forced to do in Under Fire, the movies do take sides - several miles to the left of Washington.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The U.S. surgeon general warned yesterday that Latin America may be headed for an epidemic of smoking-related diseases. Unless current trends are reversed, Surgeon General Antonia C. Novello said, in 10 years another generation of Latin American youth will be addicted to smoking. Ten years after that, she said, they run the risk of giving birth to deformed children and contracting fatal diseases. "Thirty years from now, and possibly thereafter, we will have to confront a social and economic health-care burden whose upward trajectory . . . will be difficult, if not impossible, to alter," said Novello as she released a report on smoking habits among residents of the Caribbean and Latin America.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | By Christopher Marquis, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After decades of suspicion and covert competition with the United States in Latin America, the Soviet Union is reshaping its policy under the premise that "world revolution" is dead. Top Soviet diplomats and experts on Latin America said yesterday that the Soviet Union was abandoning an admittedly "confrontational" effort challenging U.S. domination in the region and would use its influence to help reduce tensions there. In an unusually explicit account of evolving Soviet views toward Latin America, the officials said they were working to remove ideology from their policy concerns, encouraging discussion on a range of once-"taboo" subjects, seeking U.S. cooperation to defuse political conflicts and redirecting their attention from Central to South America.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | by Jorge G. Castaneda
In a country where, according to some estimates, up to 60 percent of the people are poor, and in a region with the world's most inequitable distribution of income, Pope John Paul II's trip to Mexico and Latin America this week will inevitably sharpen the debate on the role of the Roman Catholic Church in combating poverty and inequality. From Fray Bartolome de las Casas' defense of the indigenous peoples of New Spain in the 16th century through the emergence of liberation theology in the 1960s and 1970s, the Latin American coincidence of a powerful church and widespread destitution and inequity has led to unending acrimony.
NEWS
February 7, 1989
It would be nice to say that the violent coup that ousted Latin America's last old-time dictator, General Alfredo Stroessner of Paraguay, meant yet another victory for democracy in the hemisphere. Not only was Gen. Stroessner's 34 year reign brutal, but he provided safe haven for Nazi war criminals, ex-dictators, and assorted drug kingpins and criminals. He seemed increasingly out of place in Latin America, as military rule gave way to fragile new democracies. But most of those democracies are now struggling with economic problems and debt burdens that may bring them down.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | By Leonor Blum
Messianic populism is Latin America's latest answer to its problems. After six years of trying to grow out from under a $450 billion external debt, the region's democratically elected governments have only sunk deeper into their economic morass. Between 1988 and 1990 several Latin American nations will be holding elections. The candidates expected to win have a simple but powerful emotional message aimed at the poor - if Latin America stops servicing its debt for five to 10 years, the money saved could be used for higher wages and benefits for the poor.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
With the subject of New World migrations receiving fresh attention during the 500th anniversary of Columbus' historic voyage, the exhibit "Voyages to Freedom: 500 Years of Jewish Life in Latin America, 1492-1992" at Berman Museum seems most timely. The show, organized by the Jarkow Institute for Latin America of the Anti- Defamation League, New York, has a twofold aim: It highlights both Columbus' discovery and the fact that 1992 is the 500th anniversary of the expulsion of Jews from Spain.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
I was sitting in my hotel room, feeling fine after an evening of wine and tapas, when I turned on the television and joined the rest of the world in learning that glasnost might have been nothing but a sweet dream that lasted a couple of years. Looking back, the Kremlin coup attempt seemed inevitable. All that the Soviet far left (don't let anyone tell you that hard-line communists are far- rightists) held dear had come crashing down under Gorbachev. The empire in Eastern Europe had ceased to exist, and the traditional order that once forced Soviet citizens to toe the party line had become a national laughingstock.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
It was another presidential news conference. President Bush stood in a flowering garden fielding reporters' questions about the crisis in the Persian Gulf. The Rose Garden, alive in a deep and dark December? No, this news conference was taking place in Chile, where the seasons are reversed and December falls in the summer. But the way the American media covered it, you would hardly know it came in the middle of a presidential swing through Mexico and five South American nations.
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SPORTS
May 16, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The nadir of the Phillies' Latin American scouting and development program is easily identifiable. Look back at the 1989 season, and you'll find an opening-day roster that included as many players born in France as the Dominican Republic. When Juan Samuel was traded to the New York Mets later that season, the French population ruled over the Latin one inside the Phillies clubhouse. Vive la France never was a great slogan for a big-league baseball team, and since born-in-Paris shortstop Steve Jeltz was the only French representative, it really would have been a rotten one. Not surprisingly, the Phillies of that era were awful.
NEWS
February 24, 2016
By Amanda Schnetzer and William Inboden Seventy-five years ago, in his landmark "Four Freedoms" speech, President Franklin D. Roosevelt warned Congress that "at no previous time has American security been as seriously threatened from without as it is today. " The United States had not yet entered World War II, and Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor still loomed ahead. Yet Roosevelt's speech redefined America's role in the world by intertwining our national security with the fight against tyranny beyond our shores.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When President Obama and Raul Castro exchanged a historic handshake at a Summit of the Americas in Panama last weekend, Pamela Ann Martin watched on TV in Havana. "It was an exhilarating feeling," said the Ambler resident who has been arranging trips to Cuba for business people, academics, and Cuba aficionados for more than a decade and has made 66 trips to the island. "This is what I've devoted my entire life to for the past 16 years. " There is something about Cuba that gets people's juices flowing.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
A CHILD starving in South Sudan should matter to Americans. That was the message delivered last week by Nancy Lindborg, whose job at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is to lead a federal bureau spreading democracy and humanitarian assistance across the world. That world has reached a critical danger zone, with three high-level crises combining military conflict with humanitarian catastrophes affecting millions of innocents in Syria, the South Sudan and the Central African Republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Stephanie Merry, Washington Post
For all the talk about immigration, rarely does the conversation veer into why so many Latinos have come to the United States. Harvest of Empire attempts to fill in the gaps, and the reasons don't include some naive notion about streets being paved with gold. The documentary, based on the book by journalist Juan Gonzalez, makes a persuasive argument that immigration from Nicaragua, Mexico, Cuba, and other nations is the direct result of American maneuvering in Latin America. The film follows a pattern, looking at each country individually and hearing personal tales from immigrants before taking a deep dive into the history of that nation.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica - President Obama, concluding a three-day visit to Mexico and Costa Rica, is cheering Mexican economic advances and pressing other Central American leaders to deal with poverty and security while reaching out to a politically powerful Latino audience back home. Boosted by reassuring jobs numbers, Obama is calling for greater trade and economic cooperation with the U.S.'s southern neighbors, arguing that economic prosperity is the best antidote to drug and gang violence and, by extension, to the illegal immigration that the United States is seeking to control.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Juliana Barbassa, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - From the parishes of Poland to the churches of Chile, Roman Catholics around the world were stunned Monday at the first papal resignation in six centuries, even as many prayed for a new charismatic pontiff who could lead the church into a new era after decades of disaffection and mistrust. "We received the news with great regret and much surprise," said Honduran Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga, who was discussed as a possible successor to Pope John Paul II when he died in 2005.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every year, Mexican immigrants in the United States send tens of billions of dollars to relatives still south of the border, and for their largesse are hit with billions more in fees. Born in Mexico and now an American citizen living in South Philadelphia, Rosalba Meneses, 24, knows the bite of commissions and foreign-exchange charges when she sends money three times a year, totaling $1,000, to an aunt in Puebla state. "She uses it for groceries, clothing and spending," said Meneses, who pays commercial services - including Western Union, Sigue, and the online Xoom - to make the transfers, known as remittances.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Juan Blanco Prada
Latin American countries are rightfully fed up with fighting Washington's war on drugs. In the four decades since President Richard Nixon declared the war on drugs, its battles have been fought predominantly in Latin American nations, leaving behind a trail of death and corruption while failing to achieve any of its goals. After a bloody, decades-long war in Colombia, the epicenter of drug trafficking simply moved north, to Mexico. Upon taking office five years ago, Mexican President Felipe Calderón fully embraced the war on drugs, and the country quickly entered a downward spiral of violence that has left tens of thousands dead, even as the cartels remain as strong as ever.
SPORTS
May 4, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
Handing out huge signing bonuses is no more a guarantee of landing future stars in Latin America than in the domestic draft. Consider the case of first baseman Angel Villalona, who received a $2.1 million signing bonus from the Giants in 2006 and was subsequently rated the team's No. 1 prospect by several baseball websites. Three years later, it was reported that he was the main suspect in the murder of a 25-year-old man in the Dominican Republic. There has been no further news about a trial or pending charges, but he's not currently listed in the Giants' media guide.
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