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NEWS
August 27, 1999 | By Christian Esch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosa Santiago is a loquacious, vibrant person, but she scrambles for words when it comes to the award she will receive in Philadelphia on Sunday for her work in the Latino community. She'd rather stay behind the scenes, she said. But, she added with a laugh, "I just happened to have the biggest mouth. " Santiago is one of 13 women to be honored at the first Latinas march, a celebration dedicated to the achievements of Latinas in this country. Organizers expect several thousand women from across the country to attend the event, which begins at noon at Fifth and Spring Garden Streets and ends at Huntingdon and American Streets.
NEWS
October 12, 2004 | Daily News staff report
Though many aspects of the American breast cancer picture continue to improve, some news for Hispanic women remains daunting. According to the American Cancer Society, Latinas utilize mammography and other breast cancer screening tests less than any other ethnic group. Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among Latinas and five-year survival rates for Latinas are less than for any other ethnic group. Experts believe a gap in communication is a primary cause.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of poor Latinas dropped in on the "Senor" governor yesterday - without an appointment - to have a chat about the endangered funding for three Hispanic women's centers that serve the low-income Latinas from North and South Jersey. There they were crammed inside Gov. Florio's waiting room - great- grandmothers who have learned to read and write in English or Spanish, welfare mothers who want "to be somebody," professional women from other countries who came to the land of bills and money only to end up working in lamp factories or as maids because they did not speak English.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cuca Jimenez has had more than her share of fracasos de la vida, life's crashes. At age 13, she got married. And at 14, she had her first child. There were five more children - almost back to back - and then divorce. After that, Cuca went back to high school in Puerto Rico. At age 26, she earned a high school diploma and went on to study nursing in college. Then, two years later, in 1981, Cuca's sick mother, who lived in Millville, Cumberland County, needed Cuca to care for her, so the dutiful daughter left Puerto Rico with her six children.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The dialogue was Spanish-accented and carefully pronounced as Luz Cintron and Maria Morales recited lines yesterday in an English-as-second- language class exercise. The topic was one most Philadelphians are ignoring: Voting in next Tuesday's primary election. "I am just a little worried about voting. This is my first time voting. If I can't find out how to operate the voting machine, I could make a terrible mistake. I don't want my vote to go to waste," read Morales, 36, who moved back to Philadelphia from Puerto Rico (for the second time)
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Alba 's dad, Mark , is Mexican American. (Her ma, Catherine , is of Danish and French Canadian descent.) Yet the Dark Angel star has never played a Latina. That is, until her smokin' turn as a Mexican American federal agent in Machete , Robert Rodriguez 's blood-soaked, politically charged homage to grindhouse flicks. Alba, 29, tells USA Today she took the role because unlike many Latinas in the flicks, her character, Sartana, is "an intelligent, fierce, independent woman.
NEWS
May 14, 1993
Latinas make up only 4-5 percent of family planning clients in the Philadelphia area. Providers are looking for ways to increase services in those communities. Iris Caballero, director of health promotions for the Asociacion Puertorriquenos en Marcha, has been conducting focus groups in the community, asking individuals what they need and want. Q. Do Hispanic women have difficulty gaining access to the services which already are out there? A. Yes, for a long time, we've been saying that if we want women to utilize these services, there needs to be a different outreach approach.
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | By Monica Rhor INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marisol Adames, shaken by the unexpected death of three close friends four years ago and encouraged by a boyfriend to skip school, dropped out of Edison High just three months shy of graduating. Vanessa Roman struggled through morning sickness and other pregnancy-related ailments before she left school last year, as a senior. Sarah Sanchez simply drifted out of school, after never really finding a focus within herself or through her teachers. A year ago, Adames, Roman and Sanchez were among the 30 percent of Latinas in this country who leave high school without a diploma largely because of cultural barriers and expectations and socioeconomics.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They envision a throng of women, 10,000-strong, led by an array of 21 flags and costumed marchers each representing a Latin American country. They envision madres, hijas, abuelas - mothers, daughters, grandmothers - walking side by side down Market Street, past City Hall to LOVE Park. They envision a gathering of Latinas that shatters stereotypes and showcases the unsung heroines of the community, such as the mothers who work long hours in low-paid jobs, the women who hold families together.
NEWS
December 2, 2002 | By Marina Walker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nancy Santiago, 44, of Kensington, a native of Puerto Rico and the mother of five children and grandmother of six, learned last year she had contracted the AIDS virus from her boyfriend. Juana Rodriguez, 51, also from Puerto Rico, took care of her boyfriend until 1993, when he died of AIDS in her apartment in North Philadelphia. A few months later she learned she was HIV-positive, too. Maria Nieves, 47, was infected by her last partner, a man from El Salvador, whom she met in Philadelphia and dated for five years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's first Latina legislator is returning to Trenton five years after she left the state Assembly. Nilsa Cruz-Perez, who represented the Fifth Legislative District for 14 years in the Assembly, was officially appointed Saturday morning to the state Senate seat for that district. South Jersey Democrats last week had announced the selection of Cruz-Perez to fill the vacancy left by Donald Norcross when he was elected last month to the U.S. House of Representatives. She will take the oath of office at 1 p.m. Monday in the New Jersey Senate chamber.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
JOANNA OTERO-CRUZ was 16 years old when she got pregnant with her daughter Raychal. She still remembers the judgmental stares. No one had to say a word for her to know what they were thinking: Another baby with a baby. Another disgraceful example of youthful irresponsibility. Another drain on taxpayers. What did it matter to them that Cruz, now the executive director of Concilio, the oldest Latino social-service organization in the city, was raising her daughter with the baby's father?
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
THROW TWO more names into what Temple athletic director Bill Bradshaw has said is a lengthy list of people interested in the Owls' football coaching vacancy. A source familiar with the situation has told the Daily News that John Latina, who was on Temple's staff in the 1980s under Bruce Arians and just completed his first season as the offensive-line coach at Duke, is expected to reach out to Bradshaw on Friday. Latina was a candidate 7 years ago when Temple and Bradshaw hired Al Golden.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
It amounted to another slap in the face to the woman sucker-punched by a Philadelphia cop, you know, the boys in blue who took vows to serve and protect. Yet the only citizens the officers were serving and protecting Sunday were themselves, as they flocked into Fraternal Order of Police headquarters for a $30-a-head fund-raiser for Lt. Jonathan Josey, the recently fired "protector" who delivered a knockdown blow to Chester mom Aida Guzman at the Puerto Rican Day parade last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
It was an unfortunate incident, but one that propelled artist Michelle Ortiz into a career as a muralist dedicated to social change: Ortiz was a teenager, one of the few Latinas in her private high school. Fresh from art class, she went to the school store to look for a gift for her sister. The teacher in charge told her to stop handling the goods. "She told me, 'Don't touch that because your hands are dirty,' " Ortiz recalled of the conversation in 1996. Ortiz looked at her hands, puzzled.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Alba 's dad, Mark , is Mexican American. (Her ma, Catherine , is of Danish and French Canadian descent.) Yet the Dark Angel star has never played a Latina. That is, until her smokin' turn as a Mexican American federal agent in Machete , Robert Rodriguez 's blood-soaked, politically charged homage to grindhouse flicks. Alba, 29, tells USA Today she took the role because unlike many Latinas in the flicks, her character, Sartana, is "an intelligent, fierce, independent woman.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
In a quivering but determined voice, Heidi Ramirez, the most vocal member of the School Reform Commission, announced her resignation yesterday. She'll keep her post until she's replaced. But while reading from a statement during a meeting and while talking to reporters afterward, Ramirez said that differing opinions had influenced her decision. "We have different expectations for accountability and our role in public trust," she said, declining to say to whom she was referring.
NEWS
March 11, 2008 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four months after Gov. Rendell nominated her for a spot on the Philadelphia School Reform Commission, Heidi A. Ramirez yesterday was confirmed by the state Senate. Ramirez, 33, who directs the Urban Education Collaborative in Temple University's College of Education, is the first Latina to serve on the five-person board that oversees the district. "I am more anxious than ever to get started," said Ramirez, who spent the day in Harrisburg on standby, in case the senators had questions.
NEWS
November 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University education specialist Heidi A. Ramirez stands to become the School Reform Commission's youngest member at 33, its first Latina, and what Gov. Rendell calls its "most-qualified" member in terms of education background. Rendell, at a news conference in Philadelphia yesterday, said he would nominate Ramirez, a Center City resident who specializes in urban education, to become the fifth member of the body that oversees the city's schools. Her appointment is subject to confirmation by the state Senate, which could take until some time in January to act, although Rendell said he hoped it would move sooner.
NEWS
November 4, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Rendell is expected to name Heidi A. Ramirez, an education specialist who heads an urban education program at Temple University, to the Philadelphia School Reform Commission tomorrow. Ramirez, who has a doctorate in the sociology of education from Stanford University and directs the urban education collaborative at Temple, would be the first Latina on the five-member commission, which was created in 2001 when the state took over the 172,000-student district. She would replace James Nevels, who resigned in August.
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