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NEWS
September 26, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Crowds lined Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Chestnut Street yesterday to watch the Puerto Rican Week Festival parade. The parade, which started at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and proceeded to Independence Hall, wrapped up the festival.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
DEAR GOV. CORBETT, Aren't you getting tired of that smell? First you step in it when you suggest that the jobless are unemployed because they can't pass a drug test. And now, you're talking about Latinos as if they're as elusive as the chupacabra. (It's like a Latino Jersey Devil.) In case you missed it, Corbett stepped in it - again - Friday during a roundtable discussion at the Union League hosted by the Hispanic newspaper Al Dia . (Apparently the big guy didn't get the memo about knowing your audience.)
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | By Roberto Rodriguez and Patrisia Gonzales
For the year 2000 Census, here's a radical idea: U.S. residents of Mexican or Central American-origin, as well as most other Latinos, should declare themselves "Native American" on the Census questionnaire. The way it is now, most Latinos are virtually obliged to put themselves in the "white" racial category, even though they are the descendants of indigenous people who have lived in the Americas for thousands of years. In Mexico and Central America, the people there do not consider themselves white, but rather indigenous or indigenous mestizos, people of mixed Indian, African and European lineage.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Testimony describing the low percentage of Latino employees in the Health, Recreation and Human Services Departments was heard yesterday at a hearing of the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations, along with statements by city department heads that they were doing everything they could to hire Latinos. Depending on the estimate, Latinos make up 6 to 10 percent of the city's population. Just 1.5 percent of the city Health Department's 1,749 employees are Puerto Rican or Latino, said Health Commissioner Maurice Clifford.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years ago, after waiting for a newspaper job that never materialized, Colombian émigré Hernan Guaracao, a trained journalist, created Al Día, an eight-page newsletter published from his home in North Philadelphia. It began as a "hobby," Guaracao said in a recent interview, but it had a serious purpose: to present news of interest to Spanish-speaking readers in a format that challenged media stereotypes about Latinos. Today Al Día flourishes as the leading Spanish-English weekly of Southeastern Pennsylvania, South Jersey, and Delaware, a region of a half-million foreign-born Hispanics and their descendants.
NEWS
May 6, 2003
The headlines about the selection of the next member of the state Supreme Court may be fading, but the repercussions of that decision are just beginning. It's essential we move forward and create a working foundation using the hard lessons learned in recent weeks. But to ensure this occurs, we must recognize that the issue surrounding Zulima Farber, one of the most respected people in this state, was not a fight between Latinos and African Americans seeking the same piece of the pie. That categorization simply serves to deflect attention from the issues and obstacles both groups face in New Jersey.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
ONE person's Great American Success Story is another's irrelevant footnote. All depends on who's telling the tale. Example: Child of Latino immigrants overcomes adversity, works hard, makes it to the Ivy League, then the law review and rises to the highest echelons of the legal profession. Child-turned-accomplished adult gets tapped for a prestigious federal judgeship. And Democrats wage a bitter battle against the nomination, up to and including the rarely used filibuster.
NEWS
May 28, 2011 | By Ivey Dejesus, HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS
LANCASTER, Pa. - Lancaster's rolling hills are steeped in the traditions of the Amish, whose plain dress and humility are as much a tourist lure as their quilts and pies. But, as an iconic symbol, this Lancaster image could need a revision. Instead of Zerbe's potato chips, think chicharrones. Egg casserole? How about chilaquiles ? Pulled pork? Did someone say lechón asado ? Increasingly, the flavors of this south-central Pennsylvania region - famous for its mud sales and outlets - bear a marked Latin accent that goes beyond language and cuisine.
NEWS
April 25, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angel Perez says it's important his children know that jail is a dreadful and dangerous place, not one he wants them to see - not even on a visit. Perez, 42, was separated from his five children for a year while he served time for drug possession. "I don't think kids should go to see their fathers in jail," said Perez, a custodian at a private school in North Philadelphia. "They might think, 'It's OK for me to go to jail.' " A resident of the city's Kensington section, Perez, who has a son in jail, said he wanted to keep his four other children out of the grips of the criminal justice system and prison.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | By Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Paul Maryniak and Darryl Lynette Figueroa contributed to this report
Nereida Silva, a cousin of James "Bebe" Martinez, was of two emotions when a Common Pleas jury returned a sentence of life in prison for her cousin and four other defendants convicted of first-degree murder in the death of Sean Daily. (Two other defendants were found guilty of third-degree murder.) "I am relieved because they gave them life, but I'm not happy," said Silva, 24. "It's racist and we're getting tired of being treated like we're nobody. " If Latinos had sat on the jury of seven men and five women - six whites and six African-Americans - the six defendants who were Latino might have been treated differently, she said.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 2016
4.9% National unemployment rate, for June. 4.4% For whites. 5.8% For Latinos. 3.5% For Asians. 8.6% For African Americans, over age 20 8.2% For African American men, over 20. 31.2% For African American youth, 16-19. SOURCE: U.S. Labor Department
NEWS
June 25, 2016
By Taylor Hosking As members of Galaei approached the microphone at Philadelphia's City Hall vigil for Orlando, they asked Latino members of the audience to step toward the front and for non-Latinos to make room. Hesitant at first, the crowd started moving. Speaker Nikki Lopez read a passage by Latina scholar Gloria Anzaldúa's "To Live in the Border Lands" connecting queerness to Hispanic heritage. She introduced the passage, using the gender-neutral term Latinx , saying, "oftentimes, because so many of our lives are erased as queer Latinx people, we forget the legacies of those who have fought before us. Queer Latinx people live on the borderlands of many different identities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Latino Film Festival (PHLAFF) returns this weekend for its fifth year with a selection of 21 films (with a focus on shorts and documentaries), a panel discussion, and a youth workshop. Selections this year include films from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Peru, and, of course, the United States. Festival director Marangeli Mejia-Rabell said she hoped that PHLAFF not only raised the profile of minority filmmakers, but also inspired community activism.
NEWS
December 28, 2015
Black and Latino patients are less likely than whites to believe their doctors care about them, a University of Pennsylvania researcher has found in a new study. That means they may be less likely to seek medical help, adhere to physicians' instructions, or follow up with difficult treatments, wrote Abigail Sewell, a postdoctoral research fellow at Penn's Population Studies Center. Her study, published in the journal Social Science Research, relied on an analysis of surveys of 2,800 adults.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maria Farias has been without health insurance since 2011, when her husband lost his job. The Port Richmond resident, who is from Paraguay, relies on a public health center, where she pays $10 to see a doctor, because she doesn't think she can afford nearly $300 a month for insurance. "I'm still thinking about how I can get health insurance," Farias, 45, said Sunday at a festival celebrating the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a major event for Latino Catholics. "I'm just afraid it's not going to be as affordable as they say," Farias said.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fund-raiser rallying Latinos to donate to the World Meeting of Families was announced Monday to help meet the $45 million goal for the event that is bringing Pope Francis, the first Latino pope, to Philadelphia in September. Varsovia Fernandez, president of the Greater Philadelphia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, said a meeting with Latino leaders and business owners inspired creation of an online site and a mobile app for donations. The objective is to encourage at least 100,000 Latino donors to contribute at least $5 each.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
THE CLAWS are out in the mayor's race. About 40 minutes after former City Councilman Jim Kenney's campaign announced yesterday that he'd won the backing of Latino political and community leaders, fellow Democratic mayoral candidate Nelson Diaz blew a gasket. In an emailed statement, Diaz, a former Common Pleas judge, claimed that Kenney had landed the support of Latinos United for Political Empowerment only by agreeing to "fund and participate in a joint campaign" with controversial Council candidate Manny Morales.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a January campaign kickoff, a group of Latino Democratic ward leaders enthusiastically endorsed Nelson A. Diaz, seeking to become Philadelphia's first Latino mayor. On Monday, with 30 days until the May 19 Democratic primary, many of those same individuals recanted and instead endorsed former City Councilman James F. Kenney. One even took to name-calling - "charlatan" and "disgrace" - and said Diaz should pull out of the race. Diaz says it's all because he refused to support a City Council candidate, Manny Morales, who has faced controversy over racist and antigay remarks that turned up on his Facebook page.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
When nonprofit executive Will Gonzalez heard about the special enrollment period allowing people to buy health insurance when they file their income tax returns, he knew what he had to do. "We're planning for more health and taxes days," said Gonzalez, executive director of Ceiba, a Latino community group that offers free tax preparation. On Feb. 20, the Department of Health and Human Services announced that from March 15 to April 30, uninsured people can buy a plan on the Affordable Care Act marketplace - www.healthcare.gov - when they file their tax returns.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A mother and daughter stood before a Christmas tree in Norristown last week, smiling and hugging. But it was no ordinary family Christmas. The 10-year-old girl and her mother had just been reunited after seven years apart. Hours after their reunion, they visited the ACLAMO Family Center in Norristown to thank the social service organization for help with the final leg of the young girl's journey from Honduras. The organization - ACLAMO stands for Accion Comunal Latino Americano de Montgomery County - serves Latino and low-income residents in Montgomery County.
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