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NEWS
July 8, 2004
YOU CAN always expect a good laugh from Milton Street, the mayor's brother - the latest being trying to use another firm's ramp to launch his own tour boat. I guess Milton forgot that fair competition means using your own equipment. One laugh after another, but one person who is not laughing is Mayor Street. Frank Conforti Philadelphia
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1987 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
Some people laugh at religion. Others laugh religiously. Freelance cantor Charles Smolover finds that his religious work helps his improvisational comedy - and vice versa. As a cantor, whose primary responsiblity is to conduct a congregation in prayer, "you have to project an air of confidence and of peace. There's a little bit of performance involved in that," he said. "In improvisation, you have to establish a presence in front of an audience. " Smolover, 29, has been the cantor for a small congregation in the western Pennsylvania town of Indiana for seven years.
NEWS
December 31, 2010
YO, Iggle fans, keep celebrating "In-season, Meadowlands Miracles" while N.Y. Giant fans continue to celebrate Super Bowls. See you guys in the playoffs! J.R. Shiek Washington Crossing
NEWS
November 5, 2004
HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. HA. Brian Lockrey Collegevile
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
We can't claim a bayou or a delta, but there will be blues aplenty this weekend - seasoned with a dash of rock 'n' roll - when the Southern Comfort Rocks the Blues 1996 Tour hits the Great Plaza stage on SATURDAY from 1 to 10 p.m. The legendary Taj Mahal, along with guitar man Keb' Mo', the Phantom Blues Band, the subdudes, G. Love and Special Sauce, and Gingham Shmuz headline this day-long event. In addition, local blues brothers will perform, and the usual (and unusual) vendors of food and novelty items will be on hand.
SPORTS
April 19, 2012
THE GRITTY TABLOID that has served Philadelphia so well over the past 87 years was placed in the lap of Penguins center Sidney Crosby on Wednesday morning. Crosby, 24, said he had not seen Wednesday's Daily News - which featured him dressed as the Cowardly Lion with the headline "The Cowardly Penguin: Time to Finish Off Sniveling Sidney. " Crosby picked up the paper and laughed. "That's probably one of the nicer things they've said about me here," Crosby said.
SPORTS
May 13, 1986 | By BILL CONLIN, Daily News Sports Writer
Mike Schmidt says not to bother asking him how his left rib cage feels anymore. "The answer will be the same for at least the next six weeks," he said last night. "It hurts. I've got to steel myself for a jolt of pain when I sneeze, cough or laugh. I won't be doing much laughing and I hope I don't catch a cold. The only way for this kind of injury to heal is for me to not play for a couple of months and this team is not in a position for me to do that. Hopefully, one day I'll be out there and say, 'Hey, I can't hardly feel it today.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | BY MUBARAK S. DAHIR
The movie "The Birdcage" is a hysterical, occasionally moving, adaptation of the French film, La Cage aux Folles, in which a gay man's son comes home from college to announce he is engaged to the daughter of an ultra- conservative senator who would make Pat Buchanan look warm and fuzzy. When the future in-laws plan a visit, the son asks his father to get rid of a few obvious gay artifacts around the house - including Dad's swishy lover, who has been like a mother to the boy. In this hilarious film, Robin Williams (as Armand, the gay father)
NEWS
February 15, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
James is a fun-loving 14-year-old with a bright smile that draws people to him. He is known for his great sense of humor and delights in making others laugh. Although he may appear to be shy when first meeting you, he soon warms up and is talkative once he becomes comfortable with you. This teenager has many interests, including karate, football, basketball, baseball, video games and biking. When not engaged in athletic pursuits, he enjoys writing in his journal and listening to rap music.
SPORTS
September 4, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Dallas Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith, back home yesterday after a scary injury the night before in Chicago, was able to joke about it after tests found no serious damage. Smith was injured Monday night with less than four minutes to go in a 22-6 loss to the Chicago Bears when he dived over the line of scrimmage as a decoy and landed on his helmet and shoulder pads. "I did it to myself, no one else did it to me," Smith said with a laugh after tests proved negative for brain or spine damage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | Reprinted from earlier editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Almost certainly, the brains behind Victor Frankenstein - set first in 1860s London, then in a jagged castle on the rocky Scottish coast - were out to mimic the steampunk vibe of Robert Downey Jr.'s hit Sherlock Holmes pics. The cogs and gears and smokestacks of the Industrial Revolution grind and clang and hiss, a Scotland Yard inspector furrows his brow in forensic disdain, and an eccentric genius dashes to and fro, occasionally resorting to gunplay and pyrotechnics to elude his pursuers.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
In "The Night Before," Seth Rogen attempts the first bros before ho, ho, hos comedy. He plays Isaac, who tries, along with high-school buddies Chris (Anthony Mackie) and Ethan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), to maintain a fraying tradition of spending Christmas Eve together, though Isaac now has a family and Chris is a famous pro athlete. The odd dude out is Ethan, who has a botched music career and works on the fringes of the catering business, when he's not alone in his apartment moping about his breakup with Diana (Lizzy Kaplan)
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than three years have passed since Archbishop Charles J. Chaput held a little press briefing in the rectory of the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul to tell a few reporters - me among them - that Pope Benedict XVI had chosen Philadelphia to host the 2015 World Meeting of Families. I sometimes liken that moment to a soccer ball kicked at me from across a whole soccer field. It just got bigger and bigger and finally, this week, has thumped me in the head. In July, I had learned that I'd be among the journalists traveling with Pope Francis on his trip to Cuba and the United States that ends next weekend in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 9, 2015 | Molly Eichel, The Philadelphia Inquirer
Winter is coming, so instead of sulking about impending hibernation, perhaps time is best spent going for the laugh. The Oddball Festival will kick off the fall season with its murderer's row of comedians who would usually play anything from a large theater or a club like Helium, Philly's go-to venue for on-the-road funny folk. The big guns will still hit Atlantic City, but there are hidden gems to be found at smaller, non-traditional venues like Underground Arts. PHIT's Super Free Sundays Every Sunday, Adrienne Theater Looking for some local comedy?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The exit referred to in the title of Exit the King is the Big Exit, and this play by Eugène Ionesco is a 90-minute meditation on dying. The central metaphor is that the King's death is echoed by the crumbling of his kingdom, and given recent news of buildings falling into sinkholes, Alaska melting, uncontrolled wildfires, and general ecological mayhem, Exit the King seems to be what is called "ripped from the headlines. " Berenger (Robb Hutter) is the 400-year-old king, but unlike Rhinoceros , Ionesco's earlier play about Berenger, where the controlling metaphor was political, this one is existential.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
THIS IS ABOUT YOU, even though it appears to be about me and the Stu Bykofsky Candidates' Comedy Night. Tuesday's finale took in more than ever - $40,000, for a 25-year total in excess of $550,000. The show benefits Variety, the Children's Charity. That we broke the $33,000 previous high was due in large part to the title sponsorship of Comcast and a substantial gift from ThermOmegaTech in Warminster. This suggests that corporations are not always, nor all, villains. The show flew for 25 years on the wings of the charitable spirit of the politicians who participated, leaving their comfort zone for charity, and I'll get back to that in a minute.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | Will Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
TO STEAL a line from Carnac the Magnificent, a/k/a Johnny Carson, I have here in my hand the story of the last Stu Bykofsky Candidates' Comedy Night. Thunderous applause! OK, maybe that's a little unfair, even here in Santa-Claus-Snowball City. After all, in its rarely glorious 25-year run, the amateur stand-up event accomplished two remarkable things. It showed that Philadelphia's politicos can (occasionally) be intentionally funny, in the tough-crowd arena of stand-up comedy.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten years ago last week, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia served notice it was going to be a very funny show about very terrible people. The audience was not yet large when the show established that premise, in the first episode, "The Gang Gets Racist," which premiered on Aug. 4, 2005, on FX. Last year, however, with a two-season renewal, It's Always Sunny became the longest-running live-action comedy on cable. It's tied for second of all time with My Three Sons . ( Sunny 's 11th season will premiere next year on FX's sister channel, FXX.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHILE "Trainwreck" and "Ted" spark debate this summer as to who's funnier, men or women, the correct answer turns out to be "sheep. " For wall-to-wool laughs, you can't top "Shaun the Sheep," a consistently and sometimes prodigiously amusing claymation cartoon from Aardman studios, in England. The story: Farm animals grow tired of their rustic routine, so they put the farmer to sleep (the sight of sheep jumping sequentially over a fence hits humans like a massive dose of Tylenol PM)
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